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  • Volta Blanche (river, Africa)

    White Volta River, headstream of the Volta River in West Africa. It rises north of Ouagadougou, in Burkina Faso, in a lowland between two massifs, and flows generally southward for about 400 miles (640 km) to empty into Lake Volta in Ghana, a large artificial reservoir created by the Volta River

  • Volta Bridge (bridge, Adome, Ghana)

    Ho: …importance was ensured by the Volta Bridge (1957) at Adome, which connects Ho with Ghana’s southern ports. A market centre, Ho also produces palm oil, cotton, and cocoa. It lies on a main road from the coast leading northeastward to Togo. The Ho Polytechnic was founded in 1968. Pop. (2000)…

  • Volta Laboratory (research centre, Washington, District of Columbia, United States)

    Alexander Graham Bell: …money to set up his Volta Laboratory, an institution devoted to studying deafness and improving the lives of the deaf, in Washington, D.C. There he also devoted himself to improving the phonograph. By 1885 Bell and his colleagues (his cousin Chichester A. Bell and the inventor Charles Sumner Tainter) had…

  • Volta Noire (river, Africa)

    Black Volta River, river in Burkina Faso (formerly Upper Volta), Ghana, and C?te d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast), headstream of the Volta River in western Africa. It rises as the Baoulé in low hills in southwestern Burkina Faso near Bobo Dioulasso, and at the end of its course it empties into Lake Volta (in

  • Volta Redonda (Brazil)

    Volta Redonda, city, western Rio de Janeiro estado (state), Brazil. It lies along the Paraíba do Sul River, at 1,500 feet (460 metres) above sea level. The city is known for its steel manufacturing. Volta Redonda was founded in 1941 on a site chosen for its access to power, water, and basic raw

  • Volta River (river, Africa)

    Volta River, chief river system of Ghana, formed from the confluence of the Black Volta and White Volta (qq.v.) headstreams. The Volta flows generally southward through Ghana, discharging into the Gulf of Guinea. Its major tributaries are the Afram and the Oti (Pandjari). The river system has a

  • Volta River Dam (dam, Ghana)

    Akosombo Dam, rock-fill dam on the Volta River, near Akosombo, Ghana, completed in 1965 as part of the Volta River Project. Its construction was jointly financed by the government of Ghana, the World Bank, the United States, and the United Kingdom. The dam rises 440 feet (134 m) above ground level

  • Volta Rouge (river, Africa)

    Red Volta River, river in West Africa, rising in Burkina Faso (formerly Upper Volta) northwest of Ouagadougou. It flows about 200 mi (320 km) south-southeast to join the White Volta (Volta Blanche) near the Gambaga scarp in the Upper Region of Ghana. The combined rivers then turn southwestward as t

  • Volta, Alessandro (Italian scientist)

    Alessandro Volta, Italian physicist whose invention of the electric battery provided the first source of continuous current. Volta became professor of physics at the Royal School of Como in 1774. In 1775 his interest in electricity led him to improve the electrophorus, a device used to generate

  • Volta, Conte Alessandro Giuseppe Antonio Anastasio (Italian scientist)

    Alessandro Volta, Italian physicist whose invention of the electric battery provided the first source of continuous current. Volta became professor of physics at the Royal School of Como in 1774. In 1775 his interest in electricity led him to improve the electrophorus, a device used to generate

  • Volta, Ingo della (Genoese noble and financier)

    Ingo della Volta, wealthy Genoese noble and financier who led a faction that dominated the government and commerce of Genoa in the 12th century during the period of the aristocratic so-called consular commune. The della Volta, descended from officials of the margraves of Liguria who ruled Genoa in

  • volta, la (dance)

    La volta, (Italian: “the turn,” or “turning”) 16th-century leaping and turning dance for couples, originating in Italy and popular at French and German court balls until about 1750. Performed with a notoriously intimate embrace, it became respectable, but never completely dignified, after Queen

  • Volta, Lake (lake, Ghana)

    Lake Volta, artificial lake in Ghana. The lake is formed by the Akosombo Dam (q.v.), which, begun in 1961 and completed in 1965, dammed the Volta River just south of Ajena and created a lake extending upstream from the Akosombo Dam to Yapei, beyond the former confluence of the Black Volta and White

  • Volta-Congo languages (language)

    Niger-Congo languages: Classification of Niger-Congo languages: Subsequently the remaining group, labeled Volta-Congo, divided into five main branches: Kru, Kwa, Benue-Congo, Gur, and Adamawa-Ubangi. Dogon is included at this level because scholars have never been able to establish it as a member of any of the other branches.

  • voltage multiplier

    particle accelerator: Voltage multipliers (cascade generators): The source of the high voltage for Cockcroft and Walton’s pioneering experiments was a four-stage voltage multiplier assembled from four large rectifiers and high-voltage capacitors. Their circuit in effect combined four rectifier-type

  • voltage rating (physics)

    electric generator: Generator rating: The voltage rating of the generator is normally stated as the operating voltage between two of its three terminals—i.e., the phase-to-phase voltage. For a winding connected in delta, this is equal to the phase-winding voltage. For a winding connected in wye, it is equal to 3…

  • voltage regulator (electronics)

    Voltage regulator, any electrical or electronic device that maintains the voltage of a power source within acceptable limits. The voltage regulator is needed to keep voltages within the prescribed range that can be tolerated by the electrical equipment using that voltage. Such a device is widely

  • voltage transformer (electronics)

    Transformer, device that transfers electric energy from one alternating-current circuit to one or more other circuits, either increasing (stepping up) or reducing (stepping down) the voltage. Transformers are employed for widely varying purposes; e.g., to reduce the voltage of conventional power

  • Voltaian Basin (geographical region, Ghana)

    Ghana: Relief and drainage: …a large area called the Voltaian Basin in the north-central part of the country where the elevation rarely exceeds 500 feet (150 metres). The basin is dominated by Lake Volta, an artificial lake that extends far into the central part of the country behind the Akosombo Dam and covers about…

  • Voltaic (African people)

    western Africa: The wider influence of the Sudanic kingdoms: …autochthonous Gur-speaking inhabitants of the Volta basin. Their success in conquering and organizing the Gur villages into kingdoms seems to have been due to their possession of cavalry, which subsequently remained a badge of royalty and of aristocracy.

  • voltaic cell (electronics)

    materials testing: Corrosion: …is the principle of the galvanic cell or battery. Though useful in a battery, this reaction causes problems in a structure; for example, steel bolts in an aluminum framework may, in the presence of rain or fog, form multiple galvanic cells at the point of contact between the two metals,…

  • voltaic column (electronics)

    J?ns Jacob Berzelius: Electrochemical dualism: …Volta and known as the voltaic pile, provided the first experimental source of current electricity. In 1803 Berzelius demonstrated, as did the English chemist Humphry Davy at a slightly later date, the power of the voltaic pile to decompose chemicals into pairs of electrically opposite constituents. For example, water decomposed…

  • Voltaic languages

    Gur languages, a branch of the Niger-Congo language family comprising some 85 languages that are spoken by approximately 20 million people in the savanna lands north of the forest belt that runs from southeastern Mali across northern C?te d’Ivoire, through much of Burkina Faso, to all of northern

  • voltaic pile (electronics)

    J?ns Jacob Berzelius: Electrochemical dualism: …Volta and known as the voltaic pile, provided the first experimental source of current electricity. In 1803 Berzelius demonstrated, as did the English chemist Humphry Davy at a slightly later date, the power of the voltaic pile to decompose chemicals into pairs of electrically opposite constituents. For example, water decomposed…

  • Voltaire (French philosopher and author)

    Voltaire, one of the greatest of all French writers. Although only a few of his works are still read, he continues to be held in worldwide repute as a courageous crusader against tyranny, bigotry, and cruelty. Through its critical capacity, wit, and satire, Voltaire’s work vigorously propagates an

  • voltammetry (chemistry)

    chemical analysis: Voltammetry: Voltammetry can be used for both qualitative and quantitative analysis of a wide variety of molecular and ionic materials. In this method, a set of two or three electrodes is dipped into the analyte solution, and a regularly varying potential is applied to the…

  • voltammogram (instrument)

    chemical analysis: Classic polarography: A voltammogram is a plot of the current as a function of the applied potential. The shape of a voltammogram depends on the type of indicator electrode and the potential ramp that are used. In nearly all cases, the voltammogram has a current wave as shown…

  • Volterra (Italy)

    Volterra, town and episcopal see, Toscana (Tuscany) regione, central Italy, northwest of Siena. As the ancient Velathri it was one of the 12 cities of the Etruscan confederation. It supported Rome during the Second Punic War in 205 bc, acquired Roman citizenship after the civil wars between Gaius

  • Volterra, Vito (Italian mathematician)

    Vito Volterra, Italian mathematician who strongly influenced the modern development of calculus. Volterra’s later work in analysis and mathematical physics was influenced by Enrico Betti while the former attended the University of Pisa (1878–82). Volterra was appointed professor of rational

  • Volterrano, Il (Italian painter)

    Baldassare Franceschini, Italian painter of the Baroque era. At a very early age Franceschini started as an assistant to his father, a sculptor. From 1652 to 1660 he worked on paintings in the cupola of the Niccolini Chapel in Santa Croce, Florence. His work during these years was his most notable.

  • voltige (equestrian act)

    circus: Equestrian acts: …divided into three main groups: voltige, in which a rider vaults onto and off a horse’s back; trick riding, in which the standing rider performs somersaults and pirouettes or forms human pyramids with other riders on one or more horses; and high school, a spectacular form of dressage in which…

  • voltmeter (measurement)

    Voltmeter, instrument that measures voltages of either direct or alternating electric current on a scale usually graduated in volts, millivolts (0.001 volt), or kilovolts (1,000 volts). The typical commercial or laboratory standard voltmeter in use today is likely to employ an electromechanical

  • Voltolini, Friedrich (Italian physician)

    otolaryngology: One of Czermak’s assistants, Friedrich Voltolini, improved laryngoscopic illumination and also adapted the instrument for use with the otoscope.

  • Volturno River (river, Italy)

    Volturno River, river, south-central Italy. It rises in the Abruzzese Apennines near Alfedena and flows southeast as far as its junction with the Calore River near Caiazzo. It then turns southwest, past Capua, to enter the Tyrrhenian Sea at Castel Volturno, northwest of Naples. The river is 109

  • Volturnus (river, Italy)

    Volturno River, river, south-central Italy. It rises in the Abruzzese Apennines near Alfedena and flows southeast as far as its junction with the Calore River near Caiazzo. It then turns southwest, past Capua, to enter the Tyrrhenian Sea at Castel Volturno, northwest of Naples. The river is 109

  • Voltzia (fossil plant genus)

    Voltzia, a genus of fossil cone-bearing plants dating to the Early Triassic epoch (beginning 251 million years ago). It belongs to the family Voltziaceae, order Coniferales (sometimes Voltziales). The genus showed interesting modifications of the seed-cone complex of earlier forms. The

  • Voltziaceae (fossil plant family)

    conifer: Annotated classification: ?Families Walchiaceae and Voltziaceae Paleozoic and Mesozoic; show many stages in the transformation of the seed-bearing dwarf shoots of cordaiteans into the unified, flattened seed scales of modern conifers; foliage resembled that of araucarians; include Walchia, Voltzia, and Voltziopsis. ?Family Cheirolepidiaceae

  • Volubilis (ancient city, Morocco)

    Volubilis, North African archaeological site, located near Fès in the Jebel Zerhoun Plain of Morocco. Under the Mauretanian king Juba II in the 1st century bc and the 1st century ad, Volubilis became a flourishing centre of late Hellenistic culture. Annexed to Rome about ad 44, it was made a

  • volume (acoustics)

    Loudness, in acoustics, attribute of sound that determines the intensity of auditory sensation produced. The loudness of sound as perceived by human ears is roughly proportional to the logarithm of sound intensity: when the intensity is very small, the sound is not audible; when it is too great, it

  • volume (measurement)

    length, area, and volume: …region in a plane, and volume is the size of a solid. Formulas for area and volume are based on lengths. For example, the area of a circle equals π times the square of the length of its radius, and the volume of a rectangular box is the product of…

  • volume charge density (physics)

    electricity: Deriving electric field from potential: …problems in regions where the volume charge density is ρ. Laplace’s equation states that the divergence of the gradient of the potential is zero in regions of space with no charge. In the example of Figure 7, the potential on the conductors remains constant. Arbitrary values of potential are initially…

  • volume elasticity, modulus of (physics)

    Bulk modulus, numerical constant that describes the elastic properties of a solid or fluid when it is under pressure on all surfaces. The applied pressure reduces the volume of a material, which returns to its original volume when the pressure is removed. Sometimes referred to as the

  • volume fraction (solutions)

    liquid: Volume fraction: ) The composition of a nonelectrolyte solution containing very large molecules, known as polymers, is most conveniently expressed by the volume fraction (Φ)—i.e., the volume of polymer used to prepare the solution divided by the sum of that volume of polymer and the volume…

  • volume, collision (physics)

    gas: Molecular sizes: …molecules present in this so-called collision volume. If molecules are located by their centres and each molecule has a diameter d, then the collision volume will be a long cylinder of cross-sectional area πd2. The cylinder must be sufficiently long to include enough molecules so that good statistics on the…

  • volumetric analysis (chemistry)

    Volumetric analysis, any method of quantitative chemical analysis in which the amount of a substance is determined by measuring the volume that it occupies or, in broader usage, the volume of a second substance that combines with the first in known proportions, more correctly called titrimetric

  • volumetric method (baking)

    baking: Dividing: In the volumetric method, the dough is forced into pockets of a known volume. The pocket contents are cut off from the main dough mass and then ejected onto a conveyor leading to the rounder. When density is kept constant, weight and volume of the dough pieces…

  • Volumina Legum (work by Konarski)

    Stanis?aw Konarski: …a collection of Polish laws, Volumina Legum (vol. 1–6, 1732–39; vol. 7–8, 1782), that is still a basic source. O skutecznym rad sposobie, 4 vol. (1760–63; “On the Means of Effective Counsels”), was aimed against the principle of the liberum veto, which, by empowering any single deputy to break up…

  • Volumnia (fictional character)

    Coriolanus: …ultimately persuaded by his mother, Volumnia—who brings with her Coriolanus’s wife, Virgilia, and his son—to make peace with Rome, and in the end he is killed at the instigation of his Volscian ally.

  • voluntad, La (work by Azorín)

    Azorín: …wrote a trilogy of novels, La voluntad (1902; “Volition”), Antonio Azorín (1903), and Las confesiones de un peque?o filósofo (1904; “The Confessions of a Minor Philosopher”), which are actually little more than impressionistic essays written in dialogue. This trilogy operated with unifying force on the Generation of ’98, however. Animated…

  • Voluntairies (work by Tetley)

    Glen Tetley: Voluntaries (1973), staged for the Stuttgart Ballet in Germany to honour its deceased director, John Cranko, led to Tetley’s next position. From 1974 to 1976 he served as director of the company.

  • voluntarism (labour)

    Samuel Gompers: …developed the principles of “voluntarism,” which called for unions to exert coercion by economic actions—that is, through strikes and boycotts. In 1886 Gompers fostered the separation of the cigar makers and other craft unions from the Knights of Labor to form the AFL, of which he was president from…

  • voluntarism (philosophy)

    Voluntarism, any metaphysical or psychological system that assigns to the will (Latin: voluntas) a more predominant role than that attributed to the intellect. Christian philosophers have sometimes described as voluntarist: the non-Aristotelian thought of St. Augustine because of its emphasis on

  • voluntary chain store (business)

    marketing: Voluntary chains and retailer cooperatives: These are associations of independent retailers, unlike corporate chains. Wholesaler-sponsored voluntary chains of retailers who engage in bulk buying and collective merchandising are prevalent in many countries. True Value hardware stores represent this type of arrangement in the United States.…

  • Voluntary Euthanasia Legalization Society (British organization)

    euthanasia: …Legalisation Society (later called the Euthanasia Society). The society’s bill was defeated in the House of Lords in 1936, as was a motion on the same subject in the House of Lords in 1950. In the United States the Euthanasia Society of America was founded in 1938.

  • voluntary export restraint (economics)

    international trade: Nontariff barriers: Another barrier is the voluntary export restraint (VER), noted for having a less-damaging effect on the political relations between countries. It is also relatively easy to remove. This approach was applied in the early 1980s when Japanese automakers, under pressure from U.S. competitors, “voluntarily” limited their exports of automobiles…

  • Voluntary Fascist Militia for National Security (Italian organization)

    Italy: The rise of Mussolini: …were incorporated into an official Voluntary Militia for National Security. Ordinary middle-class job seekers flooded into the Fascist Party, making it more respectable and amenable; the nationalists also merged their organization into it, bringing with them much respectable backing in the south. In 1923 the electoral law was changed once…

  • voluntary health insurance (insurance)

    health insurance: …a contract, is known as private, or voluntary, health insurance. Private health insurance is usually financed on a group basis, but most plans also provide for individual policies. Private group plans are usually financed by groups of employees whose payments may be subsidized by their employer, with the money going…

  • voluntary loan (war economics)

    war finance: Voluntary loans, in which money is raised by selling government bonds, are of two types: those financed by the public from its savings and those financed by bankers and others from credit created by expansion of the monetary supply. The first type of loan is…

  • Voluntary Militia for National Security (Italian organization)

    Italy: The rise of Mussolini: …were incorporated into an official Voluntary Militia for National Security. Ordinary middle-class job seekers flooded into the Fascist Party, making it more respectable and amenable; the nationalists also merged their organization into it, bringing with them much respectable backing in the south. In 1923 the electoral law was changed once…

  • voluntary muscle (anatomy)

    Skeletal muscle, in vertebrates, most common of the three types of muscle in the body. Skeletal muscles are attached to bones by tendons, and they produce all the movements of body parts in relation to each other. Unlike smooth muscle and cardiac muscle, skeletal muscle is under voluntary control.

  • voluntary nervous system (anatomy)

    renal system: The bladder: (3) The somatic nerves cause contraction of the external sphincter; their sensory fibres relay information as to the state of distension of the posterior urethra.

  • voluntary proxenos (Greek official)

    ancient Greek civilization: Formal relationships: …hears of “voluntary proxenoi” (etheloproxenoi). The antiquity of the basic institution is not in doubt, however much the 5th-century Athenian empire may have exploited and reshaped it for its own political convenience; a 7th-century inscription from the island of Corcyra mentioning a proxenos from Locris is the earliest attestation…

  • Voluntary Restraint Agreement (Japan-United States [1981])

    automotive industry: The industry in the United States: Called the Voluntary Restraint Agreement (VRA), it spelled out how many cars each Japanese producer could ship to the United States in a single year. The VRA took effect in 1981 and was renewed annually through the early 1990s. A similar agreement was in effect in Canada…

  • voluntary seppuku (ritual suicide)

    seppuku: …were two forms of seppuku: voluntary and obligatory. Voluntary seppuku evolved during the wars of the 12th century as a method of suicide used frequently by warriors who, defeated in battle, chose to avoid the dishonour of falling into the hands of the enemy. Occasionally, a samurai performed seppuku to…

  • volunteer army (military)

    defense economics: Conscript or volunteer: Volunteer armies cost more per head because their wages must be comparable in some degree to civilian wages. While a national emergency can induce people to volunteer, a peacetime recruit is influenced by the alternative incomes that can be earned as a civilian. Some people…

  • Volunteer Army (Russian history)

    Soviet Union: The Civil War and the creation of the U.S.S.R.: …White force, known as the Volunteer Army, formed in the winter of 1917–18 in the southern areas inhabited by the Cossacks. Organized by Generals Mikhail Alekseyev and Kornilov, after their death it was taken over by General Anton Denikin. Another army was created in western Siberia; in November 1918 Admiral…

  • Volunteer Island (island, Kiribati)

    Starbuck Island, coral atoll in the Central and Southern Line Islands, part of Kiribati, southwestern Pacific Ocean. It lies 2,000 miles (3,200 km) south of Hawaii. A barren formation rising only to 26 feet (8 metres), it has a land area of 8 square miles (21 square km) and a lagoon 5.5 miles by 2

  • Volunteer Island (island, Pacific Ocean)

    Jarvis Island, coral atoll, unincorporated territory of the United States in the Northern Line Islands, west-central Pacific Ocean, about 1,000 miles (1,600 km) southwest of Honolulu. The atoll has an area of 1.6 square miles (4.1 square km). It was sighted in 1821 by Capt. Brown of the British

  • Volunteer State (state, United States)

    Tennessee, constituent state of the United States of America. It is located in the upper South of the eastern United States and became the 16th state of the union in 1796. The geography of Tennessee is unique. Its extreme breadth of 432 miles (695 km) stretches from the Appalachian Mountain

  • Volunteers (album by Jefferson Airplane)

    the Jefferson Airplane: …releases in 1969; the other, Volunteers, was a call for youth revolt, a reaction to the police riots of the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago. In addition to its agitprop title song, the album included the postapocalyptic “Wooden Ships,” cowritten by Kantner, David Crosby, and Stephen Stills. Volunteers was…

  • Volunteers in Blue and Gray: Why They Fought (work by McPherson)
  • Volunteers in Service to America (American organization)

    Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA), American governmental organization (created 1964) that placed volunteers throughout the United States to help fight poverty through work on community projects with various organizations, communities, and individuals. Among the related issues addressed by

  • Volunteers of America (American religious organization)

    Volunteers of America, religious social-welfare organization in the United States that offers spiritual and material aid to those in need. It was founded in New York City in 1896 by Ballington and Maud Booth as a result of a schism in the Salvation Army and is organized along quasi-military lines.

  • Volupté (novel by Sainte-Beuve)

    Charles Augustin Sainte-Beuve: Early critical and historical writings: …publication of Sainte-Beuve’s autobiographical novel Volupté in 1834. In this book the hero Amaury’s hopeless love for the saintly and unapproachable Madame de Coua?n reflects its author’s passion for Adèle Hugo. Volupté is an intensely introspective and troubling study of Amaury’s frustration, guilt, religious striving, and final renunciation of the…

  • Voluptés de Paris (work by Brassa?)

    Brassa?: His next book, Voluptés de Paris (1935; “Pleasures of Paris”), made him internationally famous.

  • V?luspá (Icelandic poem)

    V?luspá, (Old Norse: “Sibyl’s Prophecy”) poem consisting of about 65 short stanzas on Norse cosmogony, the history of the world of gods, men, and monsters from its beginning until the Ragnar?k (“Doom of the Gods”). In spite of its clearly pagan theme, the poem reveals Christian influence in its

  • Volutacea (gastropod superfamily)

    gastropod: Classification: Superfamily Volutacea Harp shells (Harpidae), olive shells (Olividae), mitre shells (Mitridae), volute shells (Volutidae), nutmeg shells (Cancellariidae), and marginellas (Marginellidae) generally have operculum reduced or lacking; most are tropical ocean dwellers, active

  • volute (marine snail)

    Volute, any marine snail of the family Volutidae (subclass Prosobranchia of the class Gastropoda). Most species have large, colourful shells, typically with an elongated aperture in the first whorl of the shell and a number of deep folds on the inner lip. Volutes are most common in warm, shallow

  • volute capital (architecture)

    capital: Volute capitals were known in Hittite architecture in Anatolia and in Mesopotamia as early as 870 bc. Very elaborate capitals were created in Achaemenian Persia.

  • volute centrifugal pump (engineering)

    pump: Kinetic pumps.: Volute centrifugal pumps are robust and relatively inexpensive, quiet, and dependable, and their performance is relatively unaffected by corrosion and erosion. They are compact, simple in construction, and do not require inlet and outlet check valves.

  • volute krater (pottery)

    krater: …and a disk foot; the volute krater, with an egg-shaped body and handles that rise from the shoulder and curl in a volute (scroll-shaped form) well above the rim; the calyx krater, the shape of which spreads out like the cup or calyx of a flower; and the column krater,…

  • Volutidae (marine snail)

    Volute, any marine snail of the family Volutidae (subclass Prosobranchia of the class Gastropoda). Most species have large, colourful shells, typically with an elongated aperture in the first whorl of the shell and a number of deep folds on the inner lip. Volutes are most common in warm, shallow

  • volutin (biology)

    bacteria: Cytoplasmic structures: Volutin, or metachromatic granules, contains polymerized phosphate and represents a storage form for inorganic phosphate and energy. Many bacteria possess lipid droplets that contain polymeric esters of poly-β-hydroxybutyric acid or related compounds. This is in contrast to eukaryotes, which use lipid droplets to store triglycerides.…

  • Volver (film by Almodóvar [2006])

    Pedro Almodóvar: …Catholic Church; the family drama Volver (2006; “To Return”); and Los abrazos rotos (2009; Broken Embraces), a stylish exercise in film noir. The latter two films starred Cruz.

  • Volver a empezar (film by Garci [1982])
  • Volverás a Región (novel by Benet Goitia)

    Juan Benet Goitia: …first novel—Volverás a Región (1967; Return to Región)—Benet recounts the attitudes of different characters living in an area he calls Región, somewhat resembling León. The novel caused considerable interest in Spain because of its tantalizing effects. There are frequent changes in viewpoint, and many of the passages are open to…

  • Volvo Aktiebolaget (Swedish automaker)

    Volvo Aktiebolaget, major Swedish manufacturer of buses, trucks, construction equipment, and related products. Headquarters are in Gothenburg. Volvo was created in 1926 as a wholly owned subsidiary of AB Svenska Kullagerfabriken and became an independent corporation in 1935. Its original business

  • volvocid (green algae)

    Volvocid, any of a group of green algae (division Chlorophyta) that are common in fresh water. Colonies vary from loosely associated flat disks of similar organisms (Gonium) to the complex spherical arrangement of Volvox. Each cell has a central nucleus and two or four flagella protruding from an

  • Volvox (genus of green algae)

    Volvox, genus of some 20 species of freshwater green algae (division Chlorophyta) found worldwide. Volvox form spherical or oval hollow colonies that contain some 500 to 60,000 cells embedded in a gelatinous wall and that are often just visible with the naked eye. Volvox colonies were first

  • Volvox aureus (green algae)

    Volvox: One of the most-common species, V. aureus, can form harmful algal blooms in warm waters with a high nitrogen content.

  • volvulus (pathology)

    Volvulus, twisting of a portion of the digestive tract on its mesentery (the fold of membrane that attaches the intestine to the posterior abdominal wall), resulting in intestinal obstruction, severe pain, distension of the involved segment, and interference with circulation to the affected area.

  • Volyn (historical principality, Ukraine)

    Volhynia, area of northwestern Ukraine that was a principality (10th–14th century) and then an autonomous component of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and was ruled largely by its own aristocracy (after the late 14th century). The region became prominent during the 12th century, when many emigrants

  • Volyn-Podilsk Upland (plateau, Ukraine)

    Volyn-Podilsk Upland, plateau extending between the Dniester and upper Bug river valleys in the west and the Dnieper River in the east in western Ukraine. In the north, where it is bordered by an escarpment, the plateau reaches to a line between the cities of Zhytomyr, Kremenets, and Lviv, while i

  • Volyn-Podolsk Upland (plateau, Ukraine)

    Volyn-Podilsk Upland, plateau extending between the Dniester and upper Bug river valleys in the west and the Dnieper River in the east in western Ukraine. In the north, where it is bordered by an escarpment, the plateau reaches to a line between the cities of Zhytomyr, Kremenets, and Lviv, while i

  • Volynia (historical principality, Ukraine)

    Volhynia, area of northwestern Ukraine that was a principality (10th–14th century) and then an autonomous component of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and was ruled largely by its own aristocracy (after the late 14th century). The region became prominent during the 12th century, when many emigrants

  • Volzhsky (Russia)

    Volzhsky, city, Volgograd oblast (region), southwestern Russia, on the Volga River. Volzhsky was founded in 1951 to house persons working on the large hydroelectric station on the Volga. On completion of the project in 1961, industry was brought in and the population increased rapidly. There is a

  • Vol?sky (Russia)

    Volzhsky, city, Volgograd oblast (region), southwestern Russia, on the Volga River. Volzhsky was founded in 1951 to house persons working on the large hydroelectric station on the Volga. On completion of the project in 1961, industry was brought in and the population increased rapidly. There is a

  • Vom (Nigeria)

    Vom, town, Plateau state, central Nigeria, situated on the Jos Plateau near the source of the Kaduna River, 18 miles (29 km) southwest of Jos town. It is the site of the National Veterinary Research Institute (1924) and of western Africa’s first veterinary school (1942). Vom also has a government

  • Vom Beruf unserer Zeit für Gesetzgebung und Rechtswissenschaft (work by Savigny)

    Friedrich Karl von Savigny: Legal philosophy: …Gesetzgebung und Rechtswissenschaft” (1814; “Of the Vocation of Our Age for Legislation and Jurisprudence”), that started juristic thought along a new path. To Savigny, a hasty legal codification was something to be avoided, since the one essential prerequisite for such a codification was a deep and far-reaching appreciation of…

  • Vom gastfreien Pastor (work by Hartleben)

    Otto Erich Hartleben: …as seen in the tales Vom gastfreien Pastor (1895; “From the Hospitable Pastor”). He also wrote graceful, though superficial, poetry in an impressionistic style, collected in Meine Verse (1905; “My Verses”).

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