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  • Virgo, Aqua (Roman aqueduct)

    Rome: Piazza di Spagna: …(“Scow”), is fed by the Acqua Vergine, an aqueduct of 19 bce, which escaped Gothic destruction because it was mainly underground and which was repaired in 1447. When the fountain was planned in the early 1600s by Bernini (believed to be Pietro, though some have attributed the work to his…

  • virgule (punctuation)

    punctuation: Punctuation in Greek and Latin to 1600: …elevatus are joined by the virgule (/) as an alternative form of light stop. Vernacular literature followed the less formal types of Latin literature; and the printers, as usual, followed the scribes. The first printed texts of the Bible and the liturgy are, as a rule, carefully punctuated on the…

  • viri novi (religious sect)

    mystery religion: Literature: …mystery community known as the viri novi (“the new men”). Arnobius seems to have lived among them in North Africa for a time before his conversion to Christianity. They had a religious doctrine of the soul, with marked affinities to the teachings of the Neoplatonic thinkers Plotinus and Porphyry.

  • virial coefficient (physics)

    gas: Equation of state: virial coefficients and depend only on the temperature and the particular gas. The virtue of this equation is that there is a rigorous connection between the virial coefficients and intermolecular forces, and experimental values of B(T) were an early source (and still a useful one)…

  • virial equation of state (physics)

    gas: Equation of state: …of 1/v, known as the virial equation of state:

  • Viriathus (Lusitani leader)

    Portugal: Pre-Roman, Roman, Germanic, and Muslim periods: …under the brilliant leadership of Viriathus; however, after Viriathus was assassinated about 140 bce, Decius Junius Brutus led a Roman force northward through central Portugal, crossed the Douro River, and subdued the Gallaeci. Julius Caesar governed the territory for a time. In 25 bce Caesar Augustus founded Augusta Emerita (Mérida

  • Viridiana (film by Bu?uel [1961])

    Viridiana, Spanish dramatic film, released in 1961, that is widely considered one of director Luis Bu?uel’s finest and most controversial works. Sharply critical of the Roman Catholic Church, it was banned in Spain and condemned by the Vatican. The story follows the tumultuous life of a young

  • virilist (Hungarian history)

    Budapest: The modern city: …the capital (the so-called “virilists”), while the other half of the council’s membership was elected from the rest of the electorate, based on a rather narrow franchise. Property owners thus played an important role in the government of the city: aristocrats, grain and wine merchants, German burghers, a few…

  • virilization (medical condition)

    anabolic steroid: It also leads to virilization—the development of masculine traits, including increased libido and deepening of the voice.

  • virilocal residence (anthropology)

    South American nomad: Composite bands: …in the male line) and patrilocal (a wife resided with her husband’s lineage and band).

  • virion (viral structure)

    Virion, an entire virus particle, consisting of an outer protein shell called a capsid and an inner core of nucleic acid (either ribonucleic or deoxyribonucleic acid—RNA or DNA). The core confers infectivity, and the capsid provides specificity to the virus. In some virions the capsid is further

  • viroid (infectious particle)

    Viroid, an infectious particle smaller than any of the known viruses, an agent of certain plant diseases. The particle consists only of an extremely small circular RNA (ribonucleic acid) molecule, lacking the protein coat of a virus. Viroids appear to be transmitted mechanically from one cell to

  • Virola guatemalense (plant)

    Myristicaceae: …Central American tree known as Virola guatemalense produces seeds used in flavouring and in the manufacture of candles; the whorled young branches are utilized as eggbeaters. Many of the approximately 38 species of the genus Virola provide lumber for local use.

  • Virola surinamensis (plant)

    Suriname: Plant and animal life: The baboen (Virola surinamensis), which grows in the coastal area, is used to make plywood. The kapok (Ceiba pentandra) reaches a height of more than 150 feet (45 metres). The Central Suriname Nature Reserve, covering nearly 3,950,000 acres (1,600,000 hectares), was established in June 1998 in…

  • virology (biology)

    Virology, branch of microbiology that deals with the study of viruses. Although diseases caused by viruses have been known since the 1700s and cures for many were (somewhat later) effected, the causative agent was not closely examined until 1892, when a Russian bacteriologist, D. Ivanovski,

  • Virreinato de Peru (historical area, South America)

    Viceroyalty of Peru, the second of the four viceroyalties that Spain created to govern its domains in the Americas. Established in 1543, the viceroyalty initially included all of South America under Spanish control except for the coast of what is now Venezuela. It later lost jurisdiction (with the

  • Virreinato del Río de la Plata (historical area, South America)

    Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata, the final of the four viceroyalties that Spain created during its colonization of Central and South America. Including the territory now comprising Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, and Bolivia, the new viceroyalty (established in 1776) controlled an area previously

  • Virtanen, Artturi Ilmari (Finnish biochemist)

    Artturi Ilmari Virtanen, Finnish biochemist whose investigations directed toward improving the production and storage of protein-rich green fodder, vitally important to regions characterized by long, severe winters, brought him the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1945. As a chemistry instructor at the

  • Virteburch (Germany)

    Würzburg, city, northwestern Bavaria Land (state), south-central Germany. It lies along and is an inland port of the canalized Main River, about 60 miles (100 km) southeast of Frankfurt am Main. The site of a Celtic settlement, it was first mentioned as Virteburch in 704. A bishopric was

  • Virtsj?rv (lake, Estonia)

    V?rtsj?rv, lake (j?rv) in south-central Estonia, with an area of about 110 square miles (280 square km). V?rtsj?rv forms part of the 124-mile (200-km) course of the Ema River (German: Embach), which enters the lake from the south and drains it toward the north and east into Lake Peipus on the

  • virtù (political philosophy)

    Italian literature: Political, historical, biographical, and moral literature: …principles as the concepts of virtù (“individual initiative”) and fortuna (“chance”). A man’s ability to control his destiny through the exercise of virtù is contested by forces beyond his control, summed up in the concept of fortuna. His famous treatise Il principe (The Prince), composed in 1513, in which he…

  • Virtua Fighter (electronic game)

    electronic fighting game: Three-dimensional fighting games: …goes to Sega’s arcade console Virtua Fighter (1993). Virtua Fighter was noteworthy for its realistic depiction of combat, with various playable characters that specialized in different schools of martial arts. Although Namco Limited’s Tekken (1994– ) came later, it has lasted through numerous sequels and been ported to most home…

  • Virtual Address eXtension (computer line)

    Digital Equipment Corporation: In 1978 Digital introduced the VAX (Virtual Address eXtension) computer, arguably the most successful minicomputer in history. The VAX line of systems ranged from low-cost desktop workstations to high-end computers that challenged IBM’s most powerful mainframes. Its operating system, known as VMS (Virtual Memory System), became popular among software developers,…

  • virtual baseball game (game)

    baseball: Fantasy baseball: The term fantasy baseball was introduced to describe the Internet-based virtual baseball game. But it also can be loosely construed to mean a number of games that permit the fan to play either a virtual game or a virtual season of baseball. In…

  • virtual community

    Virtual community, a group of people, who may or may not meet one another face to face, who exchange words and ideas through the mediation of digital networks. The first use of the term virtual community appeared in a article by Gene Youngblood written in 1984 but published in 1986 about Electronic

  • virtual displacement (physics)

    mechanics: The principle of virtual work: …of virtual work, any infinitesimal virtual displacement in configuration space, consistent with the constraints, requires no work. A virtual displacement means an instantaneous change in coordinates (a real displacement would require finite time during which particles might move and forces might change). To express the principle, label the generalized coordinates…

  • virtual displacements, principle of (physics)

    mechanics: The principle of virtual work: A special class of problems in mechanics involves systems in equilibrium. The problem is to find the configuration of the system, subject to whatever constraints there may be, when all forces are balanced. The body or system will be at rest (in the…

  • virtual economy (economics)

    online gaming: Birth of virtual economies: law? Another issue that game publishers have had to face is the rise of secondary economies outside their game worlds. Ultima Online designers were the first to observe this phenomenon at work when a castle in their game world sold for several thousand dollars…

  • Virtual Environment Workstation project (computer science)

    virtual reality: Entertainment: …as founding director of the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) project. The VIEW project put together a package of objectives that summarized previous work on artificial environments, ranging from creation of multisensory and immersive “virtual environment workstations” to telepresence and teleoperation applications. Influenced by a range of prior projects that included…

  • virtual image (optics)

    optical image: …kinds of images, real and virtual. In a real image the light rays actually are brought to a focus at the image position, and the real image may be made visible on a screen—e.g., a sheet of paper—whereas a virtual image cannot. Examples of real images are those made by…

  • virtual library

    library: The changing role of libraries: Although the development of digital libraries means that people do not have to go to a building for some kinds of information, users still need help to locate the information they want. In a traditional library building, a user has access to a catalog that will help locate a…

  • virtual memory (computer science)

    computer memory: Memory hierarchy: …systems spans these levels with virtual memory, a system that provides programs with large address spaces (addressable memory), which may exceed the actual RAM in the computer. Virtual memory gives each program a portion of main memory and stores the rest of its code and data on a hard disk,…

  • virtual museum (museum)

    Virtual museum, a collection of digitally recorded images, sound files, text documents, and other data of historical, scientific, or cultural interest that are accessed through electronic media. A virtual museum does not house actual objects and therefore lacks the permanence and unique qualities

  • virtual particle (physics)

    quantum electrodynamics: These photons are “virtual”; that is, they cannot be seen or detected in any way because their existence violates the conservation of energy and momentum. The photon exchange is merely the “force” of the interaction, because interacting particles change their speed and direction of travel as they release…

  • virtual photon (physics)

    quantum electrodynamics: These photons are “virtual”; that is, they cannot be seen or detected in any way because their existence violates the conservation of energy and momentum. The photon exchange is merely the “force” of the interaction, because interacting particles change their speed and direction of travel as they release…

  • virtual private network (computer network)

    Virtual private network (VPN), a private computer network deployed over a public telecommunications network, such as the Internet. A VPN typically includes one or more connected corporate intranets, or local area networks (LANs), which users at remote locations can access using a password

  • Virtual Reality

    In 2016 it seemed apparent that virtual reality (VR)—interaction between humans and Computer-generated sensory environments—had finally made the transition at the consumer level from the theoretical to the practical. A raft of new products made their debut during the year, ranging from low-end

  • virtual reality (computer science)

    Virtual reality (VR), the use of computer modeling and simulation that enables a person to interact with an artificial three-dimensional (3-D) visual or other sensory environment. VR applications immerse the user in a computer-generated environment that simulates reality through the use of

  • virtual reality modeling language (computer science)

    computer graphics: Processors and programs: VRML (virtual reality modeling language) is a graphics description language for World Wide Web applications. Several commercial and free packages provide extensive three-dimensional modeling capabilities for realistic graphics. More modest tools, offering only elementary two-dimensional graphics, are the “paint” programs commonly installed on home computers.

  • virtual sit-in (activism)

    Virtual sit-in, a tactic used by Internet activists to strongly inhibit or halt a Web site’s traffic. Conducted entirely online, the name virtual sit-in is drawn from the sit-ins that occurred during the civil rights movement in the United States, whose purpose was nonviolent civil disobedience.

  • virtual state (political system)

    cultural globalization: Challenges to national sovereignty and identity: …in theories of the “virtual state,” a new system of world politics that is said to reflect the essential chaos of 21st-century capitalism. In Out of Control (1994), author Kevin Kelly predicted that the Internet would gradually erode the power of governments to control citizens; advances in digital technology…

  • virtual storage (computer science)

    computer memory: Memory hierarchy: …systems spans these levels with virtual memory, a system that provides programs with large address spaces (addressable memory), which may exceed the actual RAM in the computer. Virtual memory gives each program a portion of main memory and stores the rest of its code and data on a hard disk,…

  • virtual velocities, principle of (physics)

    mechanics: The principle of virtual work: A special class of problems in mechanics involves systems in equilibrium. The problem is to find the configuration of the system, subject to whatever constraints there may be, when all forces are balanced. The body or system will be at rest (in the…

  • virtual work (physics)

    mechanics: The principle of virtual work: A special class of problems in mechanics involves systems in equilibrium. The problem is to find the configuration of the system, subject to whatever constraints there may be, when all forces are balanced. The body or system will be at rest (in the…

  • virtual work, principle of (physics)

    mechanics: The principle of virtual work: A special class of problems in mechanics involves systems in equilibrium. The problem is to find the configuration of the system, subject to whatever constraints there may be, when all forces are balanced. The body or system will be at rest (in the…

  • virtual world (computer science)

    Virtual reality (VR), the use of computer modeling and simulation that enables a person to interact with an artificial three-dimensional (3-D) visual or other sensory environment. VR applications immerse the user in a computer-generated environment that simulates reality through the use of

  • Virtual World Entertainment (American company)

    virtual reality: Entertainment: In 1990, Virtual World Entertainment opened the first BattleTech emporium in Chicago. Modeled loosely on the U.S. military’s SIMNET system of networked training simulators, BattleTech centres put players in individual “pods,” essentially cockpits that served as immersive, interactive consoles for both narrative and competitive game experiences. All…

  • Virtual World of Online Gaming, The

    Virtual worlds generated billions of real dollars in 2006 as millions of players around the world fought, bought, crafted, and sold in a variety of online environments. The most populous, Blizzard Entertainment’s World of Warcraft, drew seven million subscribers (with more than five million in

  • virtual-reality headset

    goggles: …of goggles: the virtual reality headset. These goggles do not protect the eyes but rather block out light and provide a stereoscopic display that gives the impression of being three-dimensional.

  • virtue (in ethics)

    ethics: …at happiness or at knowledge, virtue, or the creation of beautiful objects? If we choose happiness, will it be our own or the happiness of all? And what of the more particular questions that face us: is it right to be dishonest in a good cause? Can we justify living…

  • Virtue (film by Buzzell [1932])

    Edward Buzzell: …Big Timer, Hollywood Speaks, and Virtue, the last with Carole Lombard as a prostitute reformed by a taxicab driver (played by Pat O’Brien). Child of Manhattan and Ann Carver’s Profession (both 1933) were melodramas, while The Girl Friend (1935) was a musical starring Ann Sothern and Jack Haley. Buzzell then…

  • virtue (in Christianity)

    Virtue, in Christianity, any of the seven virtues selected as being fundamental to Christian ethics. They consist of the four “natural” virtues, those inculcated in the old pagan world that spring from the common endowment of humanity, and the three “theological” virtues, those specifically

  • virtue ethics (moral philosophy)

    Virtue ethics, Approach to ethics that takes the notion of virtue (often conceived as excellence) as fundamental. Virtue ethics is primarily concerned with traits of character that are essential to human flourishing, not with the enumeration of duties. It falls somewhat outside the traditional

  • Virtue of Selfishness, The (work by Rand)

    ethics: Ethical egoism: …Atlas Shrugged (1957) and in The Virtue of Selfishness (1965), a collection of essays, was a rather confusing mixture of appeals to self-interest and suggestions of the great benefits to society that would result from unfettered self-interested behaviour. Underlying this account was the tacit assumption that genuine self-interest cannot be…

  • Virtue, Tessa (Canadian ice dancer)

    Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir: Virtue and Moir began skating together when they were aged seven and nine, respectively. Moir’s aunt, who was also his skating coach at the time, thought that the two similarly small, athletic children would make a good match on the ice, and the pair started…

  • Virtue, Tessa; and Moir, Scott (Canadian ice dancers)

    Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir, Canadian ice dancers who became the first North Americans to win the Olympic gold medal in ice dancing when they triumphed at the 2010 Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver. The pair subsequently won a second Olympic gold medal at the 2018 Winter Games. Virtue and Moir

  • virtuoso (music)

    concerto: …forcing the soloist into a virtuoso’s role so that he can compete on an equal footing with his adversary, the orchestra. The dialogue, furthermore, influences not only the construction of individual musical phrases but also the musical textures chosen. In addition, it affects the ways of developing musical material (e.g.,…

  • Virū?haka (Hindu and Buddhist mythology)

    lokapāla: …Buddhist lokapālas are Dh?tarā??ra (east), Virū?haka (south), and Virūpāk?a (west).

  • Virúes, Cristóbal de (Spanish writer)

    Lope de Vega: Works: …particular of the Valencian playwright Cristóbal de Virués (1550–1609) was obviously profound. Toward the end of his life, in El laurel de Apolo, Vega credits Virués with having, in his “famous tragedies,” laid the very foundations of the comedia. Virués’ five tragedies, written between 1579 and 1590, do indeed display…

  • virulence (microbiology)

    bacteria: Bacteria in medicine: …continue to evolve, creating increasingly virulent strains and acquiring resistance to many antibiotics.

  • virulence factor (microbiology)

    necrotizing fasciitis: …produce a variety of so-called virulence factors that permit them to evade the defense mechanisms of the host and thus cause disease. These factors include polysaccharide capsules and M proteins that impede phagocytosis, enzymes that degrade host tissues, and toxins that overstimulate the immune system, causing fever and shock.

  • virulent phage (virus)

    bacteriophage: Life cycles of bacteriophages: …one of two life cycles, lytic (virulent) or lysogenic (temperate). Lytic phages take over the machinery of the cell to make phage components. They then destroy, or lyse, the cell, releasing new phage particles. Lysogenic phages incorporate their nucleic acid into the chromosome of the host cell and replicate with…

  • Virulent Viruses: Ebola, Chikungunya, and MERS

    Virtually every place in the world is within a single day’s journey—a fact chillingly evinced in 2014 by Outbreaks of Ebola virus disease (EVD), chikungunya fever, and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). As people at the epicentres of the outbreaks faced illness or even death, others outside

  • Virunga Mountains (mountains, Africa)

    Virunga Mountains, volcanic range north of Lake Kivu in east-central Africa, extending about 50 miles (80 km) along the borders of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, and Uganda. The range runs east-west, perpendicular to the rift valley in which lie Lakes Kivu and Edward. Of its eight

  • Virunga National Park (national park, Democratic Republic of the Congo)

    Virunga National Park, park in northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (Kinshasa). Created in 1925, it has an area of some 3,050 square miles (7,900 square km) and contains a vast diversity of habitats. The park’s southern tip rests on the northern shore of Lake Kivu, a short distance from

  • Virūpāk?a (Hindu and Buddhist mythology)

    lokapāla: Virūpāk?a (west).

  • Virūpāk?a (temple, Pattadkal, India)

    South Asian arts: Medieval temple architecture: South Indian style of Karnataka: The Virūpāk?a at Pattadkal (c. 733–746) is the most imposing and elaborate temple in the South Indian manner. It is placed within an enclosure, to which access is through a gopura; and the superstructure, consisting of four stories, has a projection in the front, a feature…

  • Virupaksha (Vijayanagar ruler)

    India: Decentralization and loss of territory: The new ruler, Virupaksha (reigned 1465–85), had been a provincial governor. His usurpation was not accepted by many of the provincial governors on the east and west coasts or by the direct descendants of Mallikarjuna, who retired to the banks of the Kaveri and ruled much of the…

  • virus (biology)

    Virus, infectious agent of small size and simple composition that can multiply only in living cells of animals, plants, or bacteria. The name is from a Latin word meaning “slimy liquid” or “poison.” The earliest indications of the biological nature of viruses came from studies in 1892 by the

  • virus crystal (virology)

    virology: In 1935 tobacco mosaic virus became the first virus to be crystallized; in 1955 the poliomyelitis virus was crystallized. (A virus “crystal” consists of several thousand viruses and, because of its purity, is well suited for chemical studies.) Virology is a discipline of immediate interest because many human diseases,…

  • virus genome (biology)

    nucleic acid: Viral genomes: Many viruses use RNA for their genetic material. This is most prevalent among eukaryotic viruses, but a few prokaryotic RNA viruses are also known. Some common examples include poliovirus, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and influenza virus, all of which affect humans, and tobacco…

  • virus, computer

    Computer virus, a portion of a program code that has been designed to furtively copy itself into other such codes or computer files. It is usually created by a prankster or vandal to effect a nonutilitarian result or to destroy data and program code. A virus consists of a set of instructions that

  • Viry-Chatillon (town, France)

    Viry-Chatillon, town, a southern suburb of Paris, Essonne département, ?le-de-France région, north-central France, on the Seine River. It is a river port, with diversified manufactures, and has a 12th-century church and a chateau (now a seminary) with 17th-century gardens designed by André Le

  • Virza, Edvarts (Latvian writer)

    Latvian literature: Edvarts Virza (pseudonym of Edvarts Lieknis) created lyrics in strict classical forms; his prose poem Straumēni (1933) praised the patriarchal farmstead. Lyrical emotionalism was disciplined in Jānis Jaunsudrabi??, whose best novel was a trilogy, Aija, Atbalss, and Ziema. World War I provided many themes for…

  • Vis (island, Croatia)

    Vis, island of Croatia in the Adriatic Sea. It is the outermost major island of the Dalmatian archipelago. The highest point on Vis is Mount Hum, at 1,926 feet (587 metres). Its climate and vegetation are Mediterranean and subtropical, with palms, Mediterranean pines, citrus, eucalyptus, cacti, and

  • Vis River (river, Namibia)

    Fish River, stream in southern Namibia. It rises in Namaqualand and flows south across the Great Namaqualand plateau, where it cuts a spectacular gorge 1,000 to 2,300 feet (300 to 700 m) deep, to empty into the Orange River. It is about 375 miles (600 km) long and is

  • visa (document)

    passport: …their borders to obtain a visa—i.e., an endorsement made on a passport by the proper authorities denoting that it has been examined and that the bearer may proceed. The visa permits the traveler to remain in a country for a specified period of time. By the late 20th century the…

  • VISA (credit card)

    credit card fraud: Background: …universal merchant acceptance was the BankAmeriCard, originally issued in 1958 by Bank of America. The card started in California but grew from there. In 1966, Bank of America expanded its bank card program by forming the BankAmeriCard Service Corporation, which licensed banks outside of California and allowed them to issue…

  • Visages villages (film by Varda [2017])

    Agnès Varda: …Academy Award-nominated Visages villages (2017; Faces Places), in which Varda and artist JR travel throughout France, photographing various people they encounter.

  • Vi?ākhadatta (Sanskrit dramatist)

    South Asian arts: The theatre: Vi?ākhadatta, the author of a rare semi-historical play called Mudrārāk?asa (“Minister Rāk?asa and his Signet Ring”), apparently was a courtier at the Gupta court. His play is a dramatization of the Machiavellian political principles expounded in the book Artha-?āstra, by Kau?ilya, who appears as the…

  • Visakhapatnam (India)

    Visakhapatnam, city and port, northeastern Andhra Pradesh state, southern India. It lies on a small embayment of the Bay of Bengal, about 380 miles (610 km) northeast of Chennai in Tamil Nadu state. Visakhapatnam is a major commercial and administrative centre with road, rail, and air connections.

  • Visakhapatnam Special Economic Zone (free-trade zone, India)

    Visakhapatnam: The Visakhapatnam Special Economic Zone is a more than 500-acre (200-hectare) free-trade zone at Duvvada, about 15 miles (24 km) southwest of Visakhapatnam, and is connected to the city by train. Pop. (2001) city, 982,904; urban agglom., 1,345,938; (2011) city, 1,237,963; urban agglom., 1,728,128.

  • Visalia (California, United States)

    Visalia, city, seat (1853) of Tulare county, south-central California, U.S. It lies on the Kaweah River delta in the San Joaquin Valley, 42 miles (68 km) southeast of Fresno. Founded in 1852 by Nathaniel Vise, it developed as an agricultural (olives, grapes, cotton) and livestock-shipping centre,

  • Visayan (people)

    Visayan, any of three ethnolinguistic groups of the Philippines—Cebuano, Hiligaynon, and

  • Visayan Islands (island group, Philippines)

    Visayan Islands, island group, central Philippines. The Visayan group consists of seven large and several hundred smaller islands clustered around the Visayan, Samar, and Camotes seas. The seven main islands are Bohol, Cebu, Leyte, Masbate, Negros, Panay, and Samar. These islands and their smaller

  • Visayas (island group, Philippines)

    Visayan Islands, island group, central Philippines. The Visayan group consists of seven large and several hundred smaller islands clustered around the Visayan, Samar, and Camotes seas. The seven main islands are Bohol, Cebu, Leyte, Masbate, Negros, Panay, and Samar. These islands and their smaller

  • visbreaker (furnace)

    petroleum refining: Visbreaking, thermal cracking, and coking: …residue were being processed in visbreakers or thermal cracking units. These simple process units basically consist of a large furnace that heats the feedstock to the range of 450 to 500 °C (840 to 930 °F) at an operating pressure of about 10 bars (1 MPa), or about 150 psi.…

  • visbreaking

    petroleum refining: Visbreaking, thermal cracking, and coking: Since World War II the demand for light products (e.g., gasoline, jet, and diesel fuels) has grown, while the requirement for heavy industrial fuel oils has declined. Furthermore, many of the new sources of crude petroleum (California, Alaska, Venezuela, and…

  • Visby (Sweden)

    Visby, city and capital of the l?n (county) of Gotland, southeastern Sweden. It lies on the northwest coast of the island of Gotland, in the Baltic Sea. Because of its remarkably well-preserved medieval ramparts and buildings, Visby, “the city of roses and ruins,” was designated a protected

  • Viscaceae (plant family)

    Viscaceae, one of the mistletoe families of flowering plants of the sandalwood order (Santalales), including about 11 genera and more than 450 species of semiparasitic shrubs. This family is sometimes considered a subfamily of the sandalwood family (Santalaceae). Members of the Viscaceae are

  • viscacha (rodent)

    Viscacha, any of four species of slender yet fairly large South American rodents similar to chinchillas. They have short forelimbs, long hindlimbs, and a long, bushy tail. The soft fur is long and dense, and the soles of the feet have fleshy pads. The three species of mountain viscachas (genus

  • Viscardi, Henry, Jr. (American activist)

    Henry Viscardi, Jr., American activist (born May 10, 1912, New York, N.Y.—died April 13, 2004, Roslyn, N.Y.), campaigned for the inclusion of the physically handicapped in the workforce. Born with legs that terminated at mid-thigh, he used personal experience to help establish a rehabilitation p

  • Viscardo y Guzmán, Juan Pablo (Peruvian author)

    Latin American literature: Historiographies: …in 1791 by the Peruvian Juan Pablo Viscardo y Guzmán. It was published first in French (1799) and then in Spanish (1801). Viscardo claimed that rapacious adventurers had transformed a shining conquest of souls into the shame of the Spanish name and that Spanish rule was tyranny. His accusations went…

  • viscera (anatomy)

    poultry processing: Evisceration and inspection: …is opened so that the viscera (internal organs) can be removed. Evisceration can be done either by hand (with knives) or by using complex, fully automated mechanical devices. Automated evisceration lines can operate at a rate of about 70 birds per minute. The equipment is cleaned (with relatively high levels…

  • visceral afferent fibre, general (anatomy)

    human nervous system: Functional types of spinal nerves: ) General visceral afferent receptors are found in organs of the thorax, abdomen, and pelvis; their fibres convey, for example, pain information from the digestive tract. Both types of afferent fibre project centrally from cell bodies in dorsal-root ganglia.

  • visceral arch (anatomy)

    Branchial arch, one of the bony or cartilaginous curved bars on either side of the pharynx (throat) that support the gills of fishes and amphibians; also, a corresponding rudimentary ridge in the embryo of higher vertebrates, which in some species may form real but transitory gill slits. In the

  • visceral brain (anatomy)

    human nervous system: Emotion and behaviour: …parts that together constitute the limbic lobe, first considered as a unit and given its name in 1878 by the French anatomist Paul Broca. Together with related nuclei, it is usually called the limbic system, consisting of the cingulate and parahippocampal gyri, the hippocampus, the amygdala, the septal and preoptic…

  • visceral efferent fibre, general (anatomy)

    human nervous system: Functional types of spinal nerves: General visceral efferent fibres also arise from cell bodies located within the spinal cord, but they exit only at thoracic and upper lumbar levels or at sacral levels (more specifically, at levels T1–L2 and S2–S4). Fibres from T1–L2 enter the sympathetic trunk, where they either…

  • visceral hump (mollusk anatomy)

    gastropod: The visceral hump: The visceral hump, or visceral mass, of gastropods is always contained within the shell; it generally holds the bulk of the digestive, reproductive, excretory, and respiratory systems. A significant part of the visceral hump consists of the mantle, or pallial, cavity. In…

  • visceral leishmaniasis (pathology)

    Kala-azar, infectious disease that is a type of leishmaniasis

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