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  • Dobry voják ?vejk a jiné podivné historky (work by Ha?ek)

    Jaroslav Ha?ek: …of short stories, of which Dobry voják ?vejk a jiné podivné historky (1912; “Good Soldier Schweik and Other Strange Stories”) is among the best known. From 1904–07 he was an editor of anarchist publications. Drafted into the Austro-Hungarian army, Ha?ek was captured on the Russian front during World War I…

  • Dobrynin, Anatoly Fyodorovich (Soviet diplomat)

    Anatoly Fyodorovich Dobrynin, Soviet diplomat, ambassador to the United States (1962–86), and dean of the Washington, D.C., diplomatic corps (1979–86). The son of a worker, Dobrynin graduated from the Sergo Ordzhonikidze Moscow Aviation Institute during the war year of 1942 and worked as an

  • Dobrzhansky, Feodosy Grigorevich (American scientist)

    Theodosius Dobzhansky, Ukrainian-American geneticist and evolutionist whose work had a major influence on 20th-century thought and research on genetics and evolutionary theory. The son of a mathematics teacher, Dobzhansky attended the University of Kiev (1917–21), where he remained to teach. In

  • Dob?iná (Slovakia)

    Dob?iná, town, Ko?icky kraj (region), eastern Slovakia. It lies in the Slovak Ore Mountains, on the Slaná River northwest of Ko?ice. The settlement was founded in 1326 by immigrant German miners and has retained the character of its lumbering and iron-mining past. A few miles northwest is Dob?inká

  • Dob?inká Ice Cave (cave, Slovakia)

    Dob?iná: A few miles northwest is Dob?inká Ice Cave, set in massive limestone rocks. The cave’s largest room, called “Big Hall,” is 396 by 148 by 39 feet (120 by 45 by 12 metres); there is also a “Little Hall.” The cave floor is an ice sheet 66 feet (20 metres)…

  • Dobson, Austin (British author)

    Austin Dobson, English poet, critic, and biographer whose love and knowledge of the 18th century lent a graceful elegance to his poetry and inspired his critical studies. Educated in Strasbourg, France, Dobson became in 1856 a civil servant at the British Board of Trade, where he remained until his

  • Dobson, Frank (British sculptor)

    Frank Dobson, English sculptor who was influential in the promotion and development of modern sculpture in England. The son of a commercial artist, Dobson studied art in Arbroath, Scotland, from 1906 to 1910 and then at the City and Guilds of London Art School until 1912. In his early paintings he

  • Dobson, Henry Austin (British author)

    Austin Dobson, English poet, critic, and biographer whose love and knowledge of the 18th century lent a graceful elegance to his poetry and inspired his critical studies. Educated in Strasbourg, France, Dobson became in 1856 a civil servant at the British Board of Trade, where he remained until his

  • Dobson, James (American religious leader)

    Focus on the Family: …American evangelical Christian and psychologist James Dobson. The organization grew to include daily and weekly radio broadcasts and launched a print magazine (1983), a syndicated newspaper column authored by Dobson (1992), a Web site (1997), and subsidiary ministries in countries throughout the world. Dobson retired as president of the group…

  • Dobson, John Lowry (American amateur astronomer)

    John Lowry Dobson , American amateur astronomer (born Sept. 14, 1915, Peking [now Beijing], China—died Jan. 15, 2014, Burbank, Calif.), fashioned large inexpensive portable reflecting telescopes that he made from common materials, including cardboard construction tubes, recycled porthole glass,

  • Dobson, Rosemary de Brissac (Australian poet)

    Rosemary de Brissac Dobson, Australian poet (born June 18, 1920, Sydney, Australia—died June 27, 2012, Canberra, Australia), garnered acclaim throughout her long career as one of the greats of mid-20th-century Australian literature, though her quiet, austere verse attested to her affinity for

  • Dobson, Thomas (American printer)

    Encyclop?dia Britannica: Third edition: Thomas Dobson, a printer in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, published a reprint titled simply Encyclop?dia (which he called the first American edition), with some parts rewritten to correct British bias. James Moore’s Dublin reprint (1791–97) was an exact reproduction of the third edition, with the addition of…

  • Dobson, William (English painter)

    William Dobson, English portrait painter, one of the first distinguished native English painters. While an apprentice to a stationer and picture dealer, the young Dobson began to copy the pictures of Titian and Anthony Van Dyck and also to draw pictures from life. Van Dyck, happening to pass a shop

  • dobsonfly (insect)

    Dobsonfly, any of a group of insects in the subfamily Corydalinae (order Megaloptera) that are usually large and have four net-veined wings of similar size and shape. Dobsonflies are found in North and South America, Asia, Australia, and Africa. Nine genera of dobsonflies, containing several dozen

  • Dobuni (ancient tribe of Britain)

    Dobuni, an ancient British tribe centred on the confluence of the Severn and Avon rivers. The Dobuni, who were ruled by a Belgic aristocracy, apparently made peace with the Roman emperor Claudius (reigned ad 41–54). Later, Corinium (Cirencester) was made the capital, and it soon became the second l

  • Dobunni (ancient tribe of Britain)

    Dobuni, an ancient British tribe centred on the confluence of the Severn and Avon rivers. The Dobuni, who were ruled by a Belgic aristocracy, apparently made peace with the Roman emperor Claudius (reigned ad 41–54). Later, Corinium (Cirencester) was made the capital, and it soon became the second l

  • dobutamine (drug)

    myocardial perfusion imaging: …intravenous injection of the drug dobutamine while monitoring the effects via echocardiography. By using dobutamine echocardiography, the heart condition of frail patients and those who have heart disease or physical limitations that preclude exercise can be evaluated. Dobutamine induces the same changes in the heart that would occur during a…

  • doby mouth (animal disease)

    Sore mouth, viral disease of sheep and goats. Blisters, pustules, ulcers, and scabs form on the lips especially but also on the face and ears. In severe cases sores form inside the mouth. Infections occur in the spring and summer and heal in about a month. Humans who work around the sheep sometimes

  • Doby, Larry (American baseball player)

    Larry Doby, American baseball player, the second African American player in the major leagues and the first in the American League when he joined the Cleveland Indians in 1947. The son of a semipro baseball player, Doby excelled at baseball, basketball, and football, earning an athletic scholarship

  • Doby, Lawrence Eugene (American baseball player)

    Larry Doby, American baseball player, the second African American player in the major leagues and the first in the American League when he joined the Cleveland Indians in 1947. The son of a semipro baseball player, Doby excelled at baseball, basketball, and football, earning an athletic scholarship

  • Dobyns, Henry (American anthropologist)

    Native American: The population of Native America: In 1966 ethnohistorian Henry Dobyns estimated that there were between 9,800,000 and 12,200,000 people north of the Rio Grande before contact; in 1983 he revised that number upward to 18,000,000 people.

  • Dobyns, Stephen (American poet)

    Stephen Dobyns, American poet and novelist whose works are characterized by a cool realism laced with pungent wit. Dobyns attended Shimer College, Mount Carroll, Illinois, and graduated from Wayne State University (B.A., 1964), Detroit, Michigan, and the University of Iowa (M.F.A., 1967), Iowa

  • Dobzhansky, Theodosius (American scientist)

    Theodosius Dobzhansky, Ukrainian-American geneticist and evolutionist whose work had a major influence on 20th-century thought and research on genetics and evolutionary theory. The son of a mathematics teacher, Dobzhansky attended the University of Kiev (1917–21), where he remained to teach. In

  • DOC (United States government)

    U.S. Department of Commerce, executive division of the U.S. federal government responsible for programs and policies relating to international trade, national economic growth, and technological advancement. Established in 1913, it administers the Bureau of the Census, the National Oceanic and

  • Doc (film by Perry [1971])

    Frank Perry: Perry next directed “Doc” (1971), a debunking of the Wyatt Earp–Doc Holliday legend. The western, which was written by Pete Hamill, starred Stacy Keach, Harris Yulin, and Faye Dunaway. Next was Play It As It Lays (1972), an adaptation of a novel by Joan Didion, who cowrote the

  • Doc Savage (fictional character)

    Doc Savage, American pulp magazine character created by Lester Dent for Street & Smith Publications in 1933. He is considered by many to be the first superhero. Following on the heels of the Shadow—Street & Smith’s first ongoing pulp character—Dr. Clark Savage, Jr., was meant to be the ideal hero.

  • Doccia porcelain (art)

    Doccia porcelain, porcelain produced at a factory near Florence founded by Marchese Carlo Ginori in 1735; until 1896 the enterprise operated under the name Doccia, since then under the name Richard-Ginori. After an initial experimental period, during which he imported Chinese porcelain samples,

  • Doce River (river, Brazil)

    Doce River, river, eastern Brazil, formed by the junction of the Carmo and Piranga rivers in southeastern Minas Gerais state. Flowing northeastward to Governador Valadares, southeastward to Colatina, and thence eastward across the coastal plain of Espírito Santo state, it empties into the Atlantic

  • docetaxel (biochemistry)

    prostate cancer: Treatment: …metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer is docetaxel, which inhibits the growth of cancer cells. When used in combination with an immunosuppressant drug called prednisone, docetaxel can prolong patient survival.

  • Docetism (religion)

    Docetism, (from Greek dokein, “to seem”), Christian heresy and one of the earliest Christian sectarian doctrines, affirming that Christ did not have a real or natural body during his life on earth but only an apparent or phantom one. Though its incipient forms are alluded to in the New Testament,

  • Docile Puerto Rican, The (work by Marqués)

    René Marqués: …in El puertorrique?o dócil [1967; The Docile Puerto Rican]), is also concerned with the problem of national identity in relation to the language, literature, and prevailing social conditions of Puerto Rico.

  • dock (sea works)

    Dock, artificially enclosed basin into which vessels are brought for inspection and repair. A brief treatment of docks follows. For full treatment, see harbours and sea works. Originally, docks were used for many purposes: as dry basins, isolated from the water by dikes or other means, they served

  • Dock, Christopher (American educator)

    Christopher Dock, Mennonite schoolmaster in colonial Pennsylvania whose teaching methods gave rise to publication of the first known book dealing with education in America. Drawn from Germany to Pennsylvania by the religious freedom accorded Mennonites, Dock opened a school at Skippack about the

  • Docker noir, Le (work by Sembène)

    Ousmane Sembène: …novel, Le Docker noir (Black Docker), based on his experiences in Marseille. After a spinal disorder forced him to give up physical labour, he made literature his livelihood. Among the works that followed were ? pays, mon beau peuple! (1957; “O My Country, My Good People”), Les Bouts de…

  • Dockers (garment)

    Levi Strauss & Co.: …line of casual pants called Dockers; the brand was released in Europe in 1994.

  • docking (spaceflight)

    spaceflight: Rendezvous and docking: Rendezvous is the process of bringing two spacecraft together, whereas docking is their subsequent meeting and physical joining. The essential elements of a rendezvous are the matching of orbital trajectories and the movement of one spacecraft within close proximity of the other, typically within…

  • Docklands (area, Melbourne, Australia)

    Melbourne: Industry and trade: …project was launched to develop Docklands, a 500-acre (200-hectare) site of crumbling industrial and port facilities, into a multiuse complex featuring high-technology businesses, parks and public spaces, restaurants, a theme park, and apartment buildings and other housing. Docklands was expected to become home for 15,000 people and a workplace for…

  • Dockwra, William (English merchant)

    Penny Post: …created by the London merchant William Dockwra in 1680. All letters and packets up to one pound in weight were delivered for one penny (1 d). The packets were also insured up to £10. Dockwra’s system consisted of several hundred receiving offices from which an hourly collection was made; the…

  • Docodon (fossil mammal genus)

    Docodon, extinct genus of mammals originally known only from fossilized teeth. The dentition patterns of the cusps and other molar structures are complex and distinct, resembling those of modern mammals; however, Docodon and its close relatives, the docodonts, are only distantly related to living

  • Docoglossa (gastropod superfamily)

    gastropod: Classification: Superfamily Patellacea (Docoglossa) Conical-shelled limpets, without slits or holes, found in rocky shallow waters (Acmaeidae and Patellidae). Superfamily Trochacea Small to large spiral shells in shallow to deep ocean waters, often brightly coloured, with or without heavy shell ornamentation; Trochidae

  • docosahexaenoic acid (chemical compound)

    nutritional disease: Dietary fat: …acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are derived from alpha-linolenic acid, a shorter-chain member of the same family. Fatty fish such as salmon, herring, sardines, mackerel, and tuna are high in both EPA and DHA. Flaxseed is an excellent source of alpha-linolenic acid, which the body

  • Docter, Pete (American film director)
  • Docter, Peter (American film director)
  • Docteur amoureux, Le (play by Molière)

    Molière: Early life and beginnings in theatre: …was Le Docteur amoureux (“The Amorous Doctor”); whether it was in the form still extant is doubtful. It apparently was a success and secured the favour of the king’s brother Philippe, duc d’Orléans. It is difficult to know the extent of Philippe’s patronage, which lasted seven years, until the…

  • Docteur Miracle, Le (operetta by Lecoq)

    Charles Lecocq: His first operetta, Le Docteur Miracle (1857), written for a competition organized by Offenbach, shared the prize with a setting of the same libretto by Bizet. He produced six one-act operettas, but his first real success was the three-act Fleur de thé (1868). Eleven operettas followed, including Les…

  • Docteur miracle, Le (work by Bizet)

    Georges Bizet: …stage work, the one-act operetta Le Docteur miracle, performed in Paris in 1857, is marked simply by high spirits and an easy mastery of the operetta idiom of the day. His Symphony in C Major, however, written in 1855 but subsequently lost and not discovered and performed until 1935, will…

  • Docteur Pascal, Le (work by Zola)

    émile Zola: Les Rougon-Macquart: Finally, in Le Docteur Pascal (1893) he uses the main character, the doctor Pascal Rougon, armed with a genealogical tree of the Rougon-Macquart family published with the novel, to expound the theories of heredity underlying the entire series.

  • doctor (academic degree)

    Doctor, title conferred by the highest university degree, taken from the Latin word for “teacher.” Originally there were three university degrees in European education: bachelor, licentiate (licence to teach), and master or doctor (admission into the teachers’ guild). The doctor’s degree was first

  • doctor (medicine)

    bioethics: The health care context: …category concerns the relationship between doctor and patient, including issues that arise from conflicts between a doctor’s duty to promote the health of his patient and the patient’s right to self-determination or autonomy, a right that in the medical context is usually taken to encompass a right to be fully…

  • Doctor and the Devils, The (work by Thomas)

    motion picture: The script: …the instance of Dylan Thomas’s The Doctor and the Devils (1953), a script became a literary work without ever having been made into a motion picture.

  • Doctor Angelicus (Italian Christian theologian and philosopher)

    St. Thomas Aquinas, ; canonized July 18, 1323; feast day January 28, formerly March 7), Italian Dominican theologian, the foremost medieval Scholastic. He developed his own conclusions from Aristotelian premises, notably in the metaphysics of personality, creation, and Providence. As a theologian,

  • Doctor Atomic (opera by Adams)

    Peter Sellars: …operas Nixon in China (1987), Doctor Atomic (2005), and A Flowering Tree (2006).

  • doctor blade (printing)

    printing: Rotogravure: …blade of soft steel, the scraper, or doctor blade, which moves slowly to and fro lengthwise. By rubbing against the cylinder with a precisely regulated degree of pressure, it causes the excess ink to drop off before the cylinder moves over the paper.

  • doctor blading (materials processing)

    advanced ceramics: Tape casting: …common tape-casting method is called doctor blading. In this process a ceramic powder slurry, containing an organic solvent such as ethanol and various other additives (e.g., polymer binder), is continuously cast onto a moving carrier surface made of a smooth, “no-stick” material such as Teflon. A smooth knife edge spreads…

  • Doctor Brodie’s Report (work by Borges)

    Jorge Luis Borges: Life: …El informe de Brodie (1970; Doctor Brodie’s Report), which deals with revenge, murder, and horror, and El libro de arena (1975; The Book of Sand), both of which are allegories combining the simplicity of a folk storyteller with the complex vision of a man who has explored the labyrinths of…

  • Doctor Club (philosophical society)

    Karl Marx: Early years: …joined a society called the Doctor Club, whose members were intensely involved in the new literary and philosophical movement. Their chief figure was Bruno Bauer, a young lecturer in theology, who was developing the idea that the Christian Gospels were a record not of history but of human fantasies arising…

  • Doctor Copernicus (fictional biography by Banville)

    John Banville: Doctor Copernicus (1976), Kepler (1981), and The Newton Letter: An Interlude (1982) are fictional biographies based on the lives of noted scientists. These three works use scientific exploration as a metaphor to question perceptions of fiction and reality. Mefisto (1986) is written from the point…

  • Doctor Dolittle (film by Fleischer [1967])

    Richard Fleischer: Middle years: …next directed Rex Harrison in Doctor Dolittle (1967). A critical and commercial disappointment, the film endured numerous production problems, including difficulties handling some 1,500 animals. The director rebounded with the gruesome but popular true-crime tale The Boston Strangler (1968), a suspenseful account of the serial killer who murdered more than…

  • Doctor Doom (comic-book character)

    Fantastic Four: Origins: …menace was more persistent than Doctor Doom, whose hideously scarred face was hidden behind an ominous iron mask. This despotic mastermind—originally Richards’s scientific colleague Victor von Doom—habitually returned to plague the group and to engage Richards in intellectual battles, always with dire consequences.

  • Doctor Faustus (novel by Mann)

    Doctor Faustus, novel by German writer Thomas Mann, published in 1947. It is a reworking of the Faust legend in the form of a biography of a fictional 20th-century composer. Doctor Faustus is the story of the rise and fall of Adrian Leverkühn, and it is told through the eyes of his friend, Serenus

  • Doctor Faustus (literary character)

    Faust, hero of one of the most durable legends in Western folklore and literature, the story of a German necromancer or astrologer who sells his soul to the devil in exchange for knowledge and power. There was a historical Faust, indeed perhaps two, one of whom more than once alluded to the devil

  • Doctor Faustus (play by Marlowe)

    Doctor Faustus, tragedy in five acts by Christopher Marlowe, published in 1604 but first performed a decade or so earlier. Marlowe’s play followed by only a few years the first translation into English of the medieval legend on which the play is based. In Doctor Faustus Marlowe retells the story of

  • Doctor Faustus: The Life of the German Composer, Adrian Leverkühn, as Told by a Friend (novel by Mann)

    Doctor Faustus, novel by German writer Thomas Mann, published in 1947. It is a reworking of the Faust legend in the form of a biography of a fictional 20th-century composer. Doctor Faustus is the story of the rise and fall of Adrian Leverkühn, and it is told through the eyes of his friend, Serenus

  • Doctor Heidegger’s Experiment (story by Hawthorne)

    Doctor Heidegger’s Experiment, story by Nathaniel Hawthorne, published in Twice-Told Tales (1837). Elderly Dr. Heidegger and four of his contemporaries participate in his scientific experiment on aging. Dr. Heidegger applies water from the Fountain of Youth to a faded rose; the flower regains its

  • Doctor in Spite of Himself, The (play by Molière)

    comedy of intrigue: …Le Médecin malgré lui (1666; The Doctor in Spite of Himself), which begins as a farce based on the simple joke of mistaking the ne’er-do-well woodcutter Sganarelle for a doctor, gradually becomes a satire on learned pretension and bourgeois credulity as Sganarelle fulfills his role as a doctor with great…

  • Doctor Invincibilis (English philosopher)

    William of Ockham, Franciscan philosopher, theologian, and political writer, a late scholastic thinker regarded as the founder of a form of nominalism—the school of thought that denies that universal concepts such as “father” have any reality apart from the individual things signified by the

  • Doctor J (American basketball player)

    Julius Erving, American collegiate and professional basketball player who was one of the most colourful and exciting figures in the game during the 1970s and ’80s. At 6 feet 6 inches (1.98 metres), Erving played forward and was noted for his fast breaks, balletic leaps toward the basket, and

  • Doctor Jekyll and Mister Hyde (novella by Stevenson)

    The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, novella by Scottish writer Robert Louis Stevenson, published in 1886. The names of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, the two alter egos of the main character, have become shorthand for the exhibition of wildly contradictory behaviour, especially between private

  • Doctor Kildare (American television program)

    Raymond Massey: …in the popular television series Doctor Kildare.

  • Doctor Mirabilis (English philosopher and scientist)

    Roger Bacon, English Franciscan philosopher and educational reformer who was a major medieval proponent of experimental science. Bacon studied mathematics, astronomy, optics, alchemy, and languages. He was the first European to describe in detail the process of making gunpowder, and he proposed

  • Doctor Mirabilis (novel by Blish)

    James Blish: …novels in the series included Doctor Mirabilis (1964), a historical novel about the 13th-century English philosopher and scientist Roger Bacon, and two novels that Blish considered as one work: Black Easter; or, Faust Aleph-Null (1968) and The Day After Judgement (1971), a fantasy in which Satan and his demons conquer…

  • Doctor My Eyes (song by Browne)

    Jackson Browne: …the Top Ten hit “Doctor My Eyes”). Part of a coterie of musicians that established Los Angeles as the home of country rock, Browne cowrote several songs for the Eagles (most notably “Take It Easy”).

  • doctor of dental medicine (degree)

    dentistry: Dental school and training: ) or doctor of dental medicine (D.M.D.), both degrees being equivalent. The program of studies during the four-year course includes the following biological sciences: human anatomy, biochemistry, bacteriology, histology, pathology, pharmacology, microbiology, and

  • doctor of dental surgery (degree)

    dentistry: Dental school and training: …dentistry to qualify as a doctor of dental surgery (D.D.S.) or doctor of dental medicine (D.M.D.), both degrees being equivalent. The program of studies during the four-year course includes the following biological sciences: human anatomy, biochemistry, bacteriology, histology, pathology, pharmacology,

  • doctor of the church (Christianity)

    Doctor of the church, saint whose doctrinal writings have special authority. In early Christianity there were four Latin (or Western) doctors of the church—Ambrose, Augustine, Gregory the Great, and Jerome—and three Greek (or Eastern) doctors—John Chrysostom, Basil the Great, and Gregory of

  • Doctor Pascal (work by Zola)

    émile Zola: Les Rougon-Macquart: Finally, in Le Docteur Pascal (1893) he uses the main character, the doctor Pascal Rougon, armed with a genealogical tree of the Rougon-Macquart family published with the novel, to expound the theories of heredity underlying the entire series.

  • doctor process of oxidation (chemistry)

    petroleum refining: Sweetening: The doctor process employs sodium plumbite, a solution of lead oxide in caustic soda, as a catalyst. At one time this inexpensive process was widely practiced, but the necessity of adding elemental sulfur to make the reactions proceed caused an increase in total sulfur content in…

  • Doctor Resolutus (English theologian and philosopher)

    John Baconthorpe, English theologian and philosopher who, although he did not subscribe to the heterodox doctrine of the great Muslim philosopher Averro?s, was regarded by the Renaissance Averroists as Princeps Averroistarum (“the prince of the Averroists”), and who strongly influenced the

  • Doctor Satan (French serial killer)

    Marcel Petiot, French serial killer who preyed on Jewish refugees attempting to flee France during the Nazi occupation. His crimes were the inspiration for Henri Troyat’s novel La Tête sur les épaules (1951; “A Good Head on His Shoulders”) and the film Docteur Petiot (1990). Petiot was unusually

  • Doctor Sleep (novel by King)

    Stephen King: …TV miniseries 2016); Joyland (2013); Doctor Sleep (2013; film 2019), a sequel to The Shining; Revival (2014); The Outsider (2018; TV miniseries 2020); and The Institute (2019). King published several of those works, including The Dead Zone and The Running Man, under the pseudonym Richard Bachman. A collection of the…

  • Doctor Sleep (film by Flanagan [2019])

    Stephen King: …Joyland (2013); Doctor Sleep (2013; film 2019), a sequel to The Shining; Revival (2014); The Outsider (2018; TV miniseries 2020); and The Institute (2019). King published several of those works, including The Dead Zone and The Running Man, under the pseudonym Richard Bachman. A collection of the first four Bachman…

  • Doctor Solemnis (French philosopher)

    Henry of Ghent, Scholastic philosopher and theologian, one of the most illustrious teachers of his time, who was a great adversary of St. Thomas Aquinas and whose controversial writings influenced his contemporaries and followers, particularly postmedieval Platonists. After studying at Tournai, w

  • Doctor Strange (fictional character)

    Doctor Strange, American comic-book superhero created for Marvel Comics by writer Stan Lee and artist Steve Ditko. The character first appeared in a backup strip in Strange Tales no. 110 in July 1963 but soon blossomed into one of the cult characters of the decade and a staple in the Marvel

  • Doctor Subtilis (Scottish philosopher and theologian)

    Blessed John Duns Scotus, ; beatified March 20, 1993), influential Franciscan realist philosopher and scholastic theologian who pioneered the classical defense of the doctrine that Mary, the mother of Jesus, was conceived without original sin (the Immaculate Conception). He also argued that the

  • doctor test (chemistry)

    organosulfur compound: Reactions: …the basis for the so-called doctor test for the detection of thiols.

  • Doctor Thorne (novel by Trollope)

    Doctor Thorne, novel by Anthony Trollope, published in three volumes in 1858. The book was the third in the series of Barsetshire novels, in which Trollope explored the fictional English county of

  • Doctor Universalis (German theologian, scientist, and philosopher)

    St. Albertus Magnus, ; canonized December 16, 1931; feast day November 15), Dominican bishop and philosopher best known as a teacher of St. Thomas Aquinas and as a proponent of Aristotelianism at the University of Paris. He established the study of nature as a legitimate science within the

  • Doctor Who (British television program)

    Doctor Who, British science fiction television series produced by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The show’s original run lasted 26 years, from 1963 to 1989. Remembered for its primitive special effects and compelling story lines, Doctor Who became a landmark of British popular culture.

  • Doctor X (film by Curtiz [1932])

    Michael Curtiz: Early life and work: …most confer that distinction on Doctor X (1932). A creepy horror film with Lionel Atwill as the mad mastermind and Tracy and Fay Wray as his would-be victims, Doctor X had a look quite its own. Another 1932 release, The Cabin in the Cotton, starred Richard Barthelmess as a sharecropper…

  • Doctor Zhivago (film by Lean [1965])

    Doctor Zhivago, American dramatic film, released in 1965, that was a sprawling adaptation of Boris Pasternak’s acclaimed novel. Although the movie earned mixed reviews, it became one of the top box-office attractions of all time. World War I and the Russian Revolution of 1917 form the backdrop for

  • Doctor Zhivago (novel by Pasternak)

    Doctor Zhivago, novel by Boris Pasternak, published in Italy in 1957. This epic tale about the effects of the Russian Revolution of 1917 and its aftermath on a bourgeois family was not published in the Soviet Union until 1987. One of the results of its publication in the West was Pasternak’s

  • Doctor’s Boy (work by Anckarsvard)

    children's literature: National and modern literature: , Doctor’s Boy, 1965) is a quietly moving tale of small-town life in the horse-and-buggy days. The Sandbergs, Inger and Lasse, have advanced the Beskow tradition in a series of lovely picture books. Fantasy has been well served by Lindgren, Edith Unnerstad, Holmberg, Hellsing, and others.…

  • doctor’s degree (academic degree)

    Doctor, title conferred by the highest university degree, taken from the Latin word for “teacher.” Originally there were three university degrees in European education: bachelor, licentiate (licence to teach), and master or doctor (admission into the teachers’ guild). The doctor’s degree was first

  • Doctor’s Dilemma, The (play by Shaw)

    The Doctor’s Dilemma, drama in four acts and an epilogue by George Bernard Shaw, performed in 1906, in London, and published in 1911. The play satirizes the medical profession and comments wryly on the general public’s inability to distinguish between personal behaviour and achievement. A question

  • Doctor’s House, The (novel by Beattie)

    Ann Beattie: The Doctor’s House (2002) portrays the impact of a despicable father and an alcoholic mother on their adult children. In the unconventional novel Mrs. Nixon (2011), Beattie imagined the life of first lady Pat Nixon and also discussed the art of writing. A Wonderful Stroke…

  • Doctor’s Wife, The (work by Ariyoshi Sawako)

    Ariyoshi Sawako: Hanaoka Seishū no tsuma (1967; The Doctor’s Wife), perhaps her best-known work, concerns the brave wife and domineering mother of Hanaoka Seishū, a 19th-century surgeon who pioneered the surgical use of anesthesia. Ariyoshi’s novels examine social issues; for example, Hishoku (1964; “Without Color”) deals with racism, Kōkutso no hito (1972;…

  • Doctor, The (work by Southey)

    Robert Southey: …and in the anonymously published The Doctor, 7 vol. (1834–47), a rambling miscellany packed with comment, quotations, and anecdotes (including the well-known children’s classic “The Story of the Three Bears”). His less successful epic poems are verse romances having a mythological or legendary subject matter set in the past and…

  • doctorate (academic degree)

    Doctor, title conferred by the highest university degree, taken from the Latin word for “teacher.” Originally there were three university degrees in European education: bachelor, licentiate (licence to teach), and master or doctor (admission into the teachers’ guild). The doctor’s degree was first

  • Doctorow, Cory (Canadian author)

    piracy: E-books and promotional piracy: The Canadian science-fiction author Cory Doctorow long held this view and gave away electronic versions of all his writings, which, he asserted, only increased sales of his books. On the other hand, American science-fiction author Harlan Ellison probably represented the views of most writers when he threatened, “If you…

  • Doctorow, E. L. (American author)

    E.L. Doctorow, American novelist known for his skillful manipulation of traditional genres. Doctorow graduated from Kenyon College (B.A., 1952) and then studied drama and directing for a year at Columbia University. He worked for a time as a script reader for Columbia Pictures in New York City. In

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