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  • didascaly (literature)

    Didascaly, the instruction or training of the chorus in ancient Greek drama. The word is from the Greek didaskalía, “teaching or instruction.” The Greek plural noun didaskaliai (“instructions”) came to refer to records of dramatic performances, containing names of authors and dates, in the form of

  • Didaskalia kai parainesis (work by Arsenius the Great)

    Arsenius The Great: His principal works include the Didaskalia kai parainesis (“Instruction and Exhortation”), which was written as a guideline for monks and is evidence, according to 6th-century historians, that he was an abbot or spiritual leader of a religious community. His commentary on the Gospel According to Luke, Eis ton peirastēn nomikon…

  • didaskaloi (teacher)

    Christianity: The operations of the Holy Spirit: The charismatic teacher (didaskalos), on the other hand, still appears. Filled with the spirit of intelligence or knowledge of the Holy Spirit, he carries out his teaching office, which does not necessarily need to be attached to an academic position. Many Free Church and ecclesiastical reform movements owe…

  • Diddley, Bo (American musician)

    Bo Diddley, American singer, songwriter, and guitarist who was one of the most influential performers of rock music’s early period. He was raised mostly in Chicago by his adoptive family, from whom he took the surname McDaniel, and he recorded for the legendary blues record company Chess as Bo

  • Diddy (American rapper, record producer, and clothing designer)

    Sean Combs, American rapper, record producer, actor, and clothing designer who founded an entertainment empire in the 1990s. Combs was born and raised in Harlem in New York City, where his father was murdered when Combs was three. Nine years later the family moved to suburban Mount Vernon, New

  • Didelot, Charles (French dancer)

    Charles Didelot, Swedish-born French dancer, choreographer, and teacher whose innovative work anticipated the Romantic ballet. Following his debut in 1790 at the Paris Opera with the ballerina Madeleine Guimard, he later turned to choreography, creating several celebrated ballets, including La

  • Didelot, Charles-Louis (French dancer)

    Charles Didelot, Swedish-born French dancer, choreographer, and teacher whose innovative work anticipated the Romantic ballet. Following his debut in 1790 at the Paris Opera with the ballerina Madeleine Guimard, he later turned to choreography, creating several celebrated ballets, including La

  • Didelphidae (marsupial, Didelphidae family)

    marsupial: Classification: Family Didelphidae (American opossums) 70 or more species in 12 genera. Order Paucituberculata (shrew, or rat, opossums) 5 species in 1 family. Family Caenolestidae 5 species in 3 genera.

  • Didelphimorphia (marsupial order)

    opossum: Classification: Order Didelphimorphia (opossums) 103 or more species in 1 family. Family Didelphidae (American opossums) 103 or more species in 19 genera found in Central and South America, including the Virginia opossum, which ranges as far north as southern Canada. Many species with unusual adaptations. Subfamily Caluromyinae

  • Didelphis albiventris (marsupial)

    opossum: Opossums of Latin America: …three species of white-eared opossums: D. albiventris in eastern Brazil and south through eastern Bolivia, Paraguay, Uruguay, and northern Argentina; D. imperfecta in Venezuela and the Guianas; and D. pernigra, found in the Andes from western Venezuela south into Bolivia.

  • Didelphis aurita (marsupial)

    opossum: Opossums of Latin America: The big-eared opossum (D. aurita) is similar to the common opossum and occurs from eastern and southern Brazil to northern Argentina. Other close relatives include three species of white-eared opossums: D. albiventris in eastern Brazil and south through eastern Bolivia, Paraguay, Uruguay, and northern Argentina; D.…

  • Didelphis imperfecta (marsupial)

    opossum: Opossums of Latin America: …Paraguay, Uruguay, and northern Argentina; D. imperfecta in Venezuela and the Guianas; and D. pernigra, found in the Andes from western Venezuela south into Bolivia.

  • Didelphis marsupialis (marsupial)

    opossum: Opossums of Latin America: The common opossum (Didelphis marsupialis) occurs from Mexico through Central America and into South America as far as the central Amazon basin. The big-eared opossum (D. aurita) is similar to the common opossum and occurs from eastern and southern Brazil to northern Argentina. Other close relatives…

  • Didelphis pernigra (marsupial)

    opossum: Opossums of Latin America: …Venezuela and the Guianas; and D. pernigra, found in the Andes from western Venezuela south into Bolivia.

  • Didelphis virginiana (marsupial)

    Virginia opossum, (Didelphis virginiana), the only marsupial (family Didelphidae, subfamily Didelphinae) found north of Mexico. The Virginia opossum occurs from southern Canada to northern Costa Rica. Populations in western Canada and along the Pacific coast south to northern Baja California,

  • dideoxy method (DNA sequencing)

    recombinant DNA: Methods: and Walter Gilbert, and the Sanger method, discovered by English biochemist Frederick Sanger. In the most commonly used method, the Sanger method, DNA chains are synthesized on a template strand, but chain growth is stopped when one of four possible dideoxy nucleotides, which lack a 3′ hydroxyl group, is incorporated,…

  • Didermocerus sumatrensis (mammal)

    Sumatran rhinoceros, (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis), one of three Asian species of rhinoceroses and the smallest living rhinoceros. Both females and males typically weigh less than 850 kg (1,870 pounds); they are 2.5 metres (8 feet) long and 1.5 metres (5 feet) high at the shoulder. Sumatran

  • Diderot, Angélique (French writer)

    Denis Diderot: Youth and marriage: …common affection for their daughter, Angélique, sole survivor of three children, who was born in 1753 and whom Diderot eventually married to Albert de Vandeul, a man of some standing at Langres. Diderot lavished care over her education, and she eventually wrote a short account of his life and classified…

  • Diderot, Denis (French philosopher)

    Denis Diderot, French man of letters and philosopher who, from 1745 to 1772, served as chief editor of the Encyclopédie, one of the principal works of the Age of Enlightenment. Diderot was the son of a widely respected master cutler. He was tonsured in 1726, though he did not in fact enter the

  • didgeridoo (musical instrument)

    Didjeridu, wind instrument in the form of a straight wooden trumpet. The instrument is made from a hollow tree branch, traditionally eucalyptus wood or ironwood, and is about 1.5 metres (5 feet) long. Decorated ceremonial varieties, however, may be two or three times longer. Modern instruments may

  • Didi (Brazilian athlete)

    Didi , (Waldir Pereira), Brazilian association football (soccer) player (born Oct. 8, 1928/29, Campos, Braz.—died May 12, 2001, Rio de Janeiro, Braz.), was a key inside-right midfielder on the Brazilian national team from 1952 until 1962, scoring 31 goals in 85 international matches. On the field D

  • Didi-Abuli (peak, Georgia)

    Georgia: Relief, drainage, and soils: …feet in the peak of Didi-Abuli.

  • Didian law (Roman law)

    ancient Rome: Culture and religion: …the Orchian provisions, and the Didian law (143) extended the limits to all Italy. A similar sense of the dangers of wealth may also have prompted the lex Voconia (169), which prohibited Romans of the wealthiest class from naming women as heirs in their wills.

  • Didinga-Murle languages

    Surmic languages, group of languages that are spoken in southwestern Ethiopia and neighbouring zones of South Sudan and that form part of the Nilo-Saharan language family. The three branches of Surmic languages are the Northern, represented by the Majang language; the Southwestern, including Baale,

  • Didinium (protozoan genus)

    gymnostome: The genus Didinium, a predator of the protozoan ciliate Paramecium, divides asexually for extended periods. In time of famine it forms a resistant stage (cyst) and undergoes nuclear reorganization.

  • Didion, Joan (American author)

    Joan Didion, American novelist and essayist known for her lucid prose style and incisive depictions of social unrest and psychological fragmentation. Didion graduated from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1956 and then worked for Vogue magazine from 1956 to 1963, first as a copywriter and

  • Didius Severus Julianus, Marcus (Roman emperor)

    Marcus Didius Severus Julianus, wealthy Roman senator who became emperor (March 28–June 1, 193) by being the highest bidder in an auction for the support of the Praetorian Guard. A member of one of the most prominent families of Mediolanum (now Milan), Didius Severus Julianus had a long and

  • didjeridoo (musical instrument)

    Didjeridu, wind instrument in the form of a straight wooden trumpet. The instrument is made from a hollow tree branch, traditionally eucalyptus wood or ironwood, and is about 1.5 metres (5 feet) long. Decorated ceremonial varieties, however, may be two or three times longer. Modern instruments may

  • didjeridu (musical instrument)

    Didjeridu, wind instrument in the form of a straight wooden trumpet. The instrument is made from a hollow tree branch, traditionally eucalyptus wood or ironwood, and is about 1.5 metres (5 feet) long. Decorated ceremonial varieties, however, may be two or three times longer. Modern instruments may

  • Didn’t it Rain (album by Laurie)

    Hugh Laurie: …Let Them Talk (2011) and Didn’t It Rain (2013), which were inspired by New Orleans-style blues. He also wrote the novels The Gun Seller (1996) and The Paper Soldier (2007). Laurie was made an Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in 2007.

  • Dido (Classical mythology)

    Dido, in Greek legend, the reputed founder of Carthage, daughter of the Tyrian king Mutto (or Belus), and wife of Sychaeus (or Acerbas). Her husband having been slain by her brother Pygmalion, Dido fled to the coast of Africa where she purchased from a local chieftain, Iarbas, a piece of land on

  • Dido (work by Stein)

    Charlotte von Stein: …court, and the prose tragedy Dido (1792; published 1867), a work containing many allusions to her break with him.

  • Dido and Aeneas (opera by Purcell)

    Henry Purcell: Music for theatre: …until 1689, when he wrote Dido and Aeneas (libretto by Nahum Tate) for performance at a girls’ school in Chelsea; this work achieves a high degree of dramatic intensity within a narrow framework. From that time until his death, he was constantly employed in writing music for the public theatres.…

  • Dido language

    Caucasian languages: The Avar-Andi-Dido languages: …and the Dido subgroup, including Dido (Tsez), Khvarshi, Hinukh, Bezhta, and Hunzib.

  • Dido languages (Caucasian language subgroup)

    Caucasian languages: The Avar-Andi-Dido languages: …Karata, and Akhvakh; and the Dido subgroup, including Dido (Tsez), Khvarshi, Hinukh, Bezhta, and Hunzib.

  • Dido, Queen of Carthage (play by Marlowe and Nashe)

    Dido, Queen of Carthage, play in five acts by Christopher Marlowe and Thomas Nashe, published in 1594. The play is based on the story of Dido and Aeneas as told in the fourth book of Virgil’s Aeneid. In the play, Dido, the queen of Carthage, is in love with Aeneas, who has taken refuge in Carthage

  • Didot family (French family)

    Didot Family, family of French printers, publishers, and typefounders who had a profound influence on the history of typography in France. The founder of the family business was Fran?ois Didot (1689–1757), who began business as a printer and bookseller in Paris in 1713. He was best known for

  • Didot, Ambroise-Firmin (French printer and typesetter)

    Didot Family: …and the third son, called Didot le jeune, followed Henri as a typemaker.

  • Didot, Firmin (French printer and typesetter)

    Didot Family: …his father’s printing office, and Firmin (c. 1765–1836), who assumed responsibility for his father’s typefoundry. Pierre published acclaimed editions of Virgil, Horace, La Fontaine, and Racine. Firmin designed the Didot typeface. He also invented stereotypes (plates cast from printing surfaces) and was thus able to publish low-priced editions of French,…

  • Didot, Fran?ois (French printer and bookseller)

    Didot Family: …of the family business was Fran?ois Didot (1689–1757), who began business as a printer and bookseller in Paris in 1713. He was best known for publishing a 20-volume collection of the works of the Abbé Prévost. Didot’s eldest son, Fran?ois-Ambroise (1730–1804), altered the standard of type design by allowing greater…

  • Didot, Fran?ois-Ambroise (French printer and typesetter)

    Didot Family: Didot’s eldest son, Fran?ois-Ambroise (1730–1804), altered the standard of type design by allowing greater contrast between thick and thin letters. He improved upon the Fournier standard of measurement for punch cutting and mold making; the Didot point system of 72 points to the French inch…

  • Didot, Henri (French printer and typesetter)

    Didot Family: …also joined the family businesses: Henri (1765–1852) is remembered for his microscopic types. For producing type he invented the Polymatype, which consisted of a long bar of matrices into which hot metal was poured. As many as 200 pieces of type could be cast in one operation. Léger (1767–1829) invented…

  • Didot, Hyacinthe-Firmin (French printer and typesetter)

    Didot Family: …Didot’s sons, Ambroise-Firmin (1790–1876) and Hyacinthe-Firmin (1794–1880), took over his business when he retired. Their most important publishing venture was an edition of the Thesaurus graecae linguae compiled by Henri Estienne (9 vol., 1855–59). Among the many other important works they published were the 200 volumes comprising the Bibliothèque des…

  • Didot, Léger (French printer and typesetter)

    Didot Family: Léger (1767–1829) invented a papermaking machine, and the third son, called Didot le jeune, followed Henri as a typemaker.

  • Didot, Pierre (French printer and typesetter)

    Didot Family: Fran?ois-Ambroise had two sons, Pierre (called Pierre l’a?né; 1761–1853), who took over his father’s printing office, and Firmin (c. 1765–1836), who assumed responsibility for his father’s typefoundry. Pierre published acclaimed editions of Virgil, Horace, La Fontaine, and Racine. Firmin designed the Didot typeface. He also invented stereotypes (plates cast…

  • Didot, Pierre Fran?ois (French publisher and printer)

    Didot Family: Fran?ois Didot’s younger son, Pierre-Fran?ois (c. 1731–93), was a typefounder, publisher, and papermaker. His three sons also joined the family businesses: Henri (1765–1852) is remembered for his microscopic types. For producing type he invented the Polymatype, which consisted of a long bar of matrices into which…

  • Didot, Pierre l’a?né (French printer and typesetter)

    Didot Family: Fran?ois-Ambroise had two sons, Pierre (called Pierre l’a?né; 1761–1853), who took over his father’s printing office, and Firmin (c. 1765–1836), who assumed responsibility for his father’s typefoundry. Pierre published acclaimed editions of Virgil, Horace, La Fontaine, and Racine. Firmin designed the Didot typeface. He also invented stereotypes (plates cast…

  • Didriksen, Babe (American athlete)

    Babe Didrikson Zaharias, American sportswoman who was one of the greatest athletes of the 20th century, achieving particular success in basketball and track and field, though she is perhaps best known for her achievements in golf. Although Didrikson claimed to have been born in 1914, various

  • Didriksen, Mildred Elaa (American athlete)

    Babe Didrikson Zaharias, American sportswoman who was one of the greatest athletes of the 20th century, achieving particular success in basketball and track and field, though she is perhaps best known for her achievements in golf. Although Didrikson claimed to have been born in 1914, various

  • Didrikson, Babe (American athlete)

    Babe Didrikson Zaharias, American sportswoman who was one of the greatest athletes of the 20th century, achieving particular success in basketball and track and field, though she is perhaps best known for her achievements in golf. Although Didrikson claimed to have been born in 1914, various

  • Didron, Adolphe-Napoléon (French journalist)

    Western architecture: France: Adolphe-Napoléon Didron, editor of the Annales archéologiques and propagandist for the Gothic Revival, tactlessly accused the Council of Civil Buildings, which was charged with the approval of all building plans in France, of irresponsibility. Its members, mainly academicians, retaliated by arbitrarily stopping the construction of…

  • Didunculinae (bird subfamily)

    pigeon: The Didunculinae consists of a single species, the tooth-billed pigeon (Didunculus strigirostris), which is native to Samoa. This fruit-eating, terrestrial pigeon has adopted arboreal ways in response to near extermination by introduced predators. Unlike most pigeons, it uses its feet to hold down its food while…

  • Didunculus strigirostris (bird)

    pigeon: …of a single species, the tooth-billed pigeon (Didunculus strigirostris), which is native to Samoa. This fruit-eating, terrestrial pigeon has adopted arboreal ways in response to near extermination by introduced predators. Unlike most pigeons, it uses its feet to hold down its food while pecking off pieces.

  • Didwana (archaeological site, India)

    India: The Indian Paleolithic: Hand axes found at Didwana, Rajasthan, similar to those from the Shiwalik Range, yield slightly younger dates of about 400,000 years ago. Examination of the desert soil strata and other evidence has revealed a correlation between prevailing climates and the successive levels of technology that constitute the Paleolithic. For…

  • Didyma (ancient site, Greece)

    Didyma, ancient sanctuary and seat of an oracle of Apollo, located south of Miletus in modern Turkey. Before being plundered and burned by the Persians (c. 494 bc), the sanctuary was in the charge of the Branchids, a priestly caste named after Branchus, a favourite youth of Apollo. After Alexander

  • Didyme Insula (island, Italy)

    Salina Island, second largest of the Eolie Islands (Lipari Islands), in the Tyrrhenian Sea (of the Mediterranean) off northeastern Sicily. It has an area of 10 square miles (26 square km). Salina, the highest of the Eolie Islands, consists of two extinct volcanoes and rises to 3,156 feet (962 m).

  • Didymelales (plant order)

    Didymelales, order of dicotyledonous flowering plants comprising the family Didymelaceae, with one genus (Didymeles) and two species, both of which are trees of Madagascar with very simple, primitive flowers. The plants are so distinctive that close relatives are nonexistent, as is reflected in

  • Didymi (ancient site, Greece)

    Didyma, ancient sanctuary and seat of an oracle of Apollo, located south of Miletus in modern Turkey. Before being plundered and burned by the Persians (c. 494 bc), the sanctuary was in the charge of the Branchids, a priestly caste named after Branchus, a favourite youth of Apollo. After Alexander

  • Didymograptus (graptolite genus)

    Didymograptus, genus of graptolites (an extinct group of colonial animals related to primitive chordates) found as fossils in Early and Middle Ordovician marine rocks (the Ordovician Period occurred from 505 to 478 million years ago). The several described species of Didymograptus, with their wide

  • Didymopanax (plant genus)

    Araliaceae: …several members of the genus Didymopanax, provides timber.

  • Didymus Chalcenterus (Greek scholar)

    Didymus Chalkenteros, Greek scholar and grammarian, one of the chief links between ancient and modern classical scholarship. His industry, as the reputed author of 3,500 books, earned him the nickname of Chalkenteros (“Brass Guts”). His output included work on the text of Homer, exegetical

  • Didymus Chalkenteros (Greek scholar)

    Didymus Chalkenteros, Greek scholar and grammarian, one of the chief links between ancient and modern classical scholarship. His industry, as the reputed author of 3,500 books, earned him the nickname of Chalkenteros (“Brass Guts”). His output included work on the text of Homer, exegetical

  • Didymus the Blind (Christian theologian)

    Didymus The Blind, Eastern church theologian who headed the influential catechetical school of Alexandria. According to Palladius, the 5th-century bishop and historian, Didymus, despite having been blind since childhood and remaining a layman all his life, became one of the most learned ascetics of

  • die (game pieces)

    Dice, small objects (polyhedrons) used as implements for gambling and the playing of social games. The most common form of die is the cube, with each side marked with from one to six small dots (spots). The spots are arranged in conventional patterns and placed so that spots on opposite sides

  • die (tool)

    Die, tool or device for imparting a desired shape, form, or finish to a material. Examples include a perforated block through which metal or plastic is drawn or extruded, the hardened steel forms for producing the patterns on coins and medals by pressure, and the hollow molds into which metal or

  • die clicker (manufacturing)

    clothing and footwear industry: Cutting processes: …knives, similar to band saws; die clickers, or beam presses; automatic computerized cutting systems with straight blades; and automated computerized laser-beam cutting machines.

  • die forming (technology)

    Mold, in manufacturing, a cavity or matrix in which a fluid or plastic substance is shaped into a desired finished product. A molten substance, such as metal, or a plastic substance is poured or forced into a mold and allowed to harden. Molds are made of a wide variety of materials, depending on t

  • Die Hard (film by McTiernan [1988])

    Bruce Willis: In the action thriller Die Hard (1988), Willis portrayed the cynical but good-natured New York City police detective John McClane, who finds himself embroiled in a terrorist attack on a Los Angeles office building. The film was a major box-office success and helped establish Willis as a leading action…

  • Die Hard 2 (film by Harlin [1990])

    Fred Thompson: …Hunt for Red October (1990), Die Hard 2 (1990), and Cape Fear (1991).

  • Die Hard with a Vengeance (film by McTiernan [1995])

    Samuel L. Jackson: …1990s included Jurassic Park (1993), Die Hard with a Vengeance (1995), A Time to Kill (1996), The Long Kiss Goodnight (1996), Tarantino’s Jackie Brown (1997), The Negotiator (1998), and Star Wars: Episode I—The Phantom Menace (1999), as Mace Windu. He reprised that role in Star Wars:

  • die press (manufacturing)

    clothing and footwear industry: Cutting processes: …knives, similar to band saws; die clickers, or beam presses; automatic computerized cutting systems with straight blades; and automated computerized laser-beam cutting machines.

  • die sinking (metallurgy)

    Diesinking, process of machining a cavity in a steel block to be used for molding plastics, or for hot and cold forging, die-casting, and coining. The die block is mounted on a table while a vertical-spindle milling machine with end cutters is used to shape the die. In most simple machines the

  • die skin (brick and tile manufacturing)

    brick and tile: Texture: This surface is called the die skin; its removal and further treatment produce other textures. In wire cutting, for instance, a wire placed in front of the column of clay as it comes from the die removes the die skin, creating a semi-rough surface. In sand finishing, sand is applied…

  • die-casting (industrial process)

    Die-casting, forming metal objects by injecting molten metal under pressure into dies, or molds. An early and important use of the technique was in the Mergenthaler Linotype machine (1884) to give line-long combinations of letters, but the appearance of the mass-production automobile assembly line

  • dieback (plant pathology)

    Dieback, common symptom or name of disease, especially of woody plants, characterized by progressive death of twigs, branches, shoots, or roots, starting at the tips. Staghead is a slow dieback of the upper branches of a tree; the dead, leafless limbs superficially resemble a stag’s head. Dieback

  • Diebenkorn, Richard (American painter)

    Richard Diebenkorn, American Modernist painter credited with elevating the status of California art. He was often indifferent toward current trends and reflected in his work the influences of such diverse artists as Henri Matisse, Edward Hopper, Mark Rothko, Piet Mondrian, Willem de Kooning, and

  • Diebenkorn, Richard Clifford, Jr. (American painter)

    Richard Diebenkorn, American Modernist painter credited with elevating the status of California art. He was often indifferent toward current trends and reflected in his work the influences of such diverse artists as Henri Matisse, Edward Hopper, Mark Rothko, Piet Mondrian, Willem de Kooning, and

  • Diebitsch, Hans Karl Friedrich Anton, Graf (Russian military officer)

    Hans Karl von Diebitsch, military officer whose Balkan campaigns determined the Russian victory in the Russo-Turkish War of 1828–29. Although he was of German parentage and was educated at the Berlin cadet school, Diebitsch joined the Russian Army in 1801, and, after fighting against Napoleon in

  • Diebitsch, Hans Karl von (Russian military officer)

    Hans Karl von Diebitsch, military officer whose Balkan campaigns determined the Russian victory in the Russo-Turkish War of 1828–29. Although he was of German parentage and was educated at the Berlin cadet school, Diebitsch joined the Russian Army in 1801, and, after fighting against Napoleon in

  • Diebold, John (American business consultant)

    John Diebold, American business consultant (born June 8, 1926, Weehawken, N.J.—died Dec. 26, 2005, Bedford Hills, N.Y.), was an early promoter of the use of computer systems for business, and his visionary thinking concerning information technology helped usher in the computer age. When Diebold r

  • diecasting (industrial process)

    Die-casting, forming metal objects by injecting molten metal under pressure into dies, or molds. An early and important use of the technique was in the Mergenthaler Linotype machine (1884) to give line-long combinations of letters, but the appearance of the mass-production automobile assembly line

  • Dieci dell’Arbitrio (Italian council)

    Baglioni Family: …created the Ten Judges (Dieci dell’Arbitrio), a council of 10 family members, as a device through which they hoped to govern Perugia. The period was marked by excessive violence, especially within the Baglioni family. One episode was the so-called great betrayal of 1500, during which Carlo and Grifonetto Baglioni…

  • Dieci libri di pensieri diversi di Alessandro Tassoni (work by Tassoni)

    Alessandro Tassoni: …literary, scientific, and political thoughts, Dieci libri di pensieri diversi di Alessandro Tassoni (1620; “Ten Books of Diverse Thoughts of Alessandro Tassoni”).

  • Diedenhofen (France)

    Thionville, town, Moselle département, Grand Est région, northeastern France. It is on the canalized Moselle River, near the Luxembourg border. It has remains of a 13th-century castle, built by the counts of Luxembourg. Formerly a part of the Holy Roman Empire, Thionville was taken from the

  • Diederik van den Elzas (count of Flanders)

    Thierry, count of Flanders (1128–68), son of Thierry II, duke of Upper Lorraine, and Gertrude, daughter of Robert I the Frisian, count of Flanders. He contested the county of Flanders with William Clito on the death of Charles the Good in 1127. He was recognized by Ghent, Bruges, and Ypres and

  • Diefenbaker, John G. (prime minister of Canada)

    John G. Diefenbaker, leader of the Progressive Conservative Party who was prime minister of Canada in 1957–63, following 22 years of uninterrupted Liberal rule. After serving in World War I, Diefenbaker practiced law in Saskatchewan. He was made King’s Counsel in 1929. In 1936 he was chosen as

  • Diefenbaker, John George (prime minister of Canada)

    John G. Diefenbaker, leader of the Progressive Conservative Party who was prime minister of Canada in 1957–63, following 22 years of uninterrupted Liberal rule. After serving in World War I, Diefenbaker practiced law in Saskatchewan. He was made King’s Counsel in 1929. In 1936 he was chosen as

  • Diefenbaker, Lake (lake, Canada)

    lake: Bottom morphology: One fairly recent example is Lake Diefenbaker, in Saskatchewan. In this region of prairie farmland, the banks of the new lake are extremely vulnerable to erosion, and planners have had to contend with the consequences of bank cutting and infilling of the basin. There are many examples of lesser engineering…

  • Dieffenbachia (plant)

    Dumb cane, (genus Dieffenbachia), any of about 30 species of herbaceous plants valued as indoor foliage for their ability to tolerate low light intensities. The name mother-in-law’s tongue, sometimes used for these plants, is also applied to Sansevieria species. Dumb cane (especially D. seguine)

  • Dieffenbachia amoena (plant)

    dumb cane: D. amoena is a plant of large size, up to 6 feet (180 cm) or more, with 20-inch- (50-cm-) long leaves, having creamy markings along the larger veins. Flowers are borne on a long spadix, with male flowers on top and female flowers below. A…

  • Dieffenbachia maculata (plant)

    dumb cane: …less variegated leaves; they include D. maculata (formerly D. picta) and D. seguine (native to the West Indies), both of which have yielded colourful varieties of horticultural interest. D. amoena is a plant of large size, up to 6 feet (180 cm) or more, with 20-inch- (50-cm-) long leaves, having…

  • Dieffenbachia picta (plant)

    dumb cane: …less variegated leaves; they include D. maculata (formerly D. picta) and D. seguine (native to the West Indies), both of which have yielded colourful varieties of horticultural interest. D. amoena is a plant of large size, up to 6 feet (180 cm) or more, with 20-inch- (50-cm-) long leaves, having…

  • Dieffenbachia seguine (plant)

    dumb cane: picta) and D. seguine (native to the West Indies), both of which have yielded colourful varieties of horticultural interest. D. amoena is a plant of large size, up to 6 feet (180 cm) or more, with 20-inch- (50-cm-) long leaves, having creamy markings along the larger veins.…

  • Diego blood group system

    Diego blood group system, classification of human blood according to the properties conferred by the presence of an antigen designated Di. There are 21 known Diego antigens; however, the determination of an individual’s Diego blood type is based on the antigens denoted Dia (identified in 1955) and

  • Diego Cendoya, Gerardo (Spanish poet and musicologist)

    Gerardo Diego, Spanish musicologist and prolific, innovative poet. Diego received a doctorate from the University of Madrid in 1920. During the 1920s he wrote experimental poetry and joined the avant-garde Ultraísmo and Creacionismo movements. He taught for a time in the ancient town of Soria in

  • Diego de Acebes (Spanish bishop)

    St. Dominic: Early life and career: In 1203 Diego, bishop of Osma, was sent on a royal mission abroad and took Dominic with him.

  • Diego de Osma (Spanish bishop)

    St. Dominic: Early life and career: In 1203 Diego, bishop of Osma, was sent on a royal mission abroad and took Dominic with him.

  • Diego Garcia (island, Indian Ocean)

    Diego Garcia, coral atoll, largest and southernmost member of the Chagos Archipelago, in the central Indian Ocean, part of the British Indian Ocean Territory. Occupying an area of 17 square miles (44 square km), it consists of a V-shaped sand-fringed cay about 15 miles (24 km) in length with a

  • Diego Garcia: A Strategic Base

    When the U.S. and its allies launched their attack on Iraq in 2003, Diego Garcia—home to U.S. long-range bombers, patrol planes, and cargo ships as well as refueling and other support personnel—once again proved its logistic value as what many considered one of the top three U.S. military bases in

  • Diego, Gerardo (Spanish poet and musicologist)

    Gerardo Diego, Spanish musicologist and prolific, innovative poet. Diego received a doctorate from the University of Madrid in 1920. During the 1920s he wrote experimental poetry and joined the avant-garde Ultraísmo and Creacionismo movements. He taught for a time in the ancient town of Soria in

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