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  • Dempsey, Martin (United States army general)

    Martin Dempsey, U.S. Army general who served as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (2011–15). Dempsey graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1974 and received his army commission that same year as an armor officer with the 2nd Armored Cavalry Regiment. He subsequently

  • Dempsey, Martin Edward (United States army general)

    Martin Dempsey, U.S. Army general who served as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (2011–15). Dempsey graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1974 and received his army commission that same year as an armor officer with the 2nd Armored Cavalry Regiment. He subsequently

  • Dempsey, Miles Christopher (British general)

    Miles Christopher Dempsey, British army officer who commanded the Second Army, the main British force in the Allied drive across western Europe (1944–45) during World War II. Dempsey was commissioned in the British Army in 1915 and fought in France during World War I. He was a lieutenant colonel

  • Dempsey, Nonpareil Jack (American boxer)

    Nonpareil Jack Dempsey, Irish-born American bare-knuckle fighter who was the world middleweight champion from 1884 to 1891. Dempsey, who moved to the United States as a young child, was a proficient wrestler before he began his career as a boxer. For his first fight he gave his name as Jack

  • Dempsey, Patrick (American actor)

    Grey's Anatomy: …characters included Derek Shepherd (Patrick Dempsey), Miranda Bailey (Chandra Wilson), Richard Webber (James Pickens, Jr.), Cristina Yang (Sandra Oh), and Izzie Stevens (Katherine Heigl). Most of the action takes place in Seattle Grace Hospital, where Meredith and her peers face obstacles, first as interns striving to become residents and…

  • Dempsey, Sir Miles (British general)

    Miles Christopher Dempsey, British army officer who commanded the Second Army, the main British force in the Allied drive across western Europe (1944–45) during World War II. Dempsey was commissioned in the British Army in 1915 and fought in France during World War I. He was a lieutenant colonel

  • Dempsey, Sister Mary Joseph (American nurse)

    Sister Mary Joseph Dempsey, American nurse and hospital administrator, remembered for her exceptional medical and administrative abilities and for her contributions to nursing education. Julia Dempsey in August 1878 entered the Third Order Regular of St. Francis of the Congregation of Our Lady of

  • Dempsey, Tom (American football player)

    New Orleans Saints: …through the 1982 season, and Tom Dempsey, who kicked an NFL-record (tied in 1998) 63-yard game-winning field goal in 1970. In 1983 the team’s fans adopted a long-standing chant used at local high school and collegiate football games. The chant (“Who dat? Who dat? Who dat say dey gonna beat…

  • Dempsey, William Harrison (American boxer)

    Jack Dempsey, American world heavyweight boxing champion, regarded by many as the apotheosis of the professional fighter. He held the title from July 4, 1919, when he knocked out Jess Willard in three rounds in Toledo, Ohio, until September 23, 1926, when he lost a 10-round decision to Gene Tunney

  • Dempster Highway (highway, North America)

    Arctic: Land transport: …branch off this road, the Dempster Highway, reaches Inuvik, Northwest Territories, in the Mackenzie River delta.

  • Dempster, Arthur Jeffrey (American physicist)

    Arthur Jeffrey Dempster, American physicist who built the first mass spectrometer, a device used to separate and measure the quantities of different charged particles, such as atomic nuclei or molecular fragments. Dempster was educated at the University of Toronto (A.B., 1909; M.A., 1910) and then

  • Dempster, Nigel (British columnist)

    Nigel Dempster, (Nigel Richard Patton Dempster), British gossip columnist (born Nov. 1, 1941, British India—died July 12, 2007, Ham, Surrey, Eng.), wrote (1973–2003) an avidly read column for the Daily Mail in which he chronicled the personal lives, peccadilloes, and misfortunes of celebrities and

  • Dempster, Nigel Richard Patton (British columnist)

    Nigel Dempster, (Nigel Richard Patton Dempster), British gossip columnist (born Nov. 1, 1941, British India—died July 12, 2007, Ham, Surrey, Eng.), wrote (1973–2003) an avidly read column for the Daily Mail in which he chronicled the personal lives, peccadilloes, and misfortunes of celebrities and

  • Dempwolff, Otto (German linguist)

    Austronesian languages: The work of Otto Dempwolff: The modern study of the Austronesian languages is generally traced to the German medical doctor and linguist Otto Dempwolff, whose three-volume Comparative Phonology of Austronesian Word Lists, published between 1934 and 1938, established a more complete sound system than that of Brandstetter and…

  • Demskey, Izzy (American actor and producer)

    Kirk Douglas, American film actor and producer best known for his portrayals of resolute, emotionally charged heroes and antiheroes. The son of Russian Jewish immigrants, he was born Issur Danielovitch and later became known as Izzy Demsky before taking the stage name Kirk Douglas. He worked as an

  • demurrer (law)

    Demurrer, in law, a process whereby a party hypothetically admits as true certain facts alleged by the opposition but asserts that they are not sufficient grounds for relief, or redress. A ruling on a demurrer can result in the quick disposition of a case resting on the point of law challenged in

  • Demus, Otto (Austrian scholar)

    mosaic: Middle Byzantine mosaics: The 20th-century Austrian scholar Otto Demus, in studies on the aesthetics of middle Byzantine mosaic art, coined the term space icons for this kind of imagery, in which the forms of architecture collaborate to make the solemnly stylized figures appear with unexpected tactility. As shown by Demus, the spatial…

  • Demuth, Charles (American painter)

    Charles Demuth, painter who helped channel modern European movements into American art and who was also a leading exponent of Precisionism. Demuth’s early training was under Thomas Anshutz and William Merritt Chase at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Between 1907 and 1913 Demuth made

  • Demy, Jacques (French director)

    Jacques Demy, French director best known for his romantic musical-comedy films. Demy studied for two years at France’s Technical School of Photography and Cinematography and then was an assistant to animator Paul Grimault (1952–54) and to director Georges Roquier (1954–57). Demy’s early films

  • demyelinating encephalitis (pathology)

    encephalitis: Demyelinating encephalitis: A large number of acute encephalitides are of the type known as demyelinating encephalitis, which may develop in children as a complication of viral diseases such as measles or chickenpox or as a result of vaccination against such viral diseases as smallpox. Damage…

  • demyelinating neuropathy (pathology)

    muscle disease: Lower motor neuron disease: These are known as demyelinating neuropathies. Symptoms are similar to neuropathies with axonal degeneration, but since the axons remain intact, the muscles rarely atrophy. Recovery from demyelinating neuropathies can be rapid. Diphtheria and autoimmune diseases such as Guillain-Barré syndrome cause demyelinating neuropathies. Other causes of peripheral neuropathy include diabetes…

  • demyelination (pathology)

    brainstem: …trauma, tumours, strokes, infections, and demyelination (multiple sclerosis). Complete loss of brainstem function is regarded by some experts as equivalent to brain death.

  • demyelinization (pathology)

    brainstem: …trauma, tumours, strokes, infections, and demyelination (multiple sclerosis). Complete loss of brainstem function is regarded by some experts as equivalent to brain death.

  • demythologization (theology)

    myth: Demythologization of major religious traditions: Demythologization should be distinguished from secularization. Every living mythology must come to terms with the world in which it is transmitted and to that extent inevitably goes through processes of secularization. Demythologization, however, refers to the conscious efforts people make…

  • Den Bosch (Netherlands)

    ’s-Hertogenbosch, gemeente (municipality), south-central Netherlands. It is situated where the Dommel and Aa rivers join to form the Dieze and lies along the Zuidwillemsvaart (canal). Chartered in 1185 by Henry I, duke of Brabant, who had a hunting lodge nearby (hence the name, meaning “the duke’s

  • Den of Thieves (film by Gudegast [2018])

    Gerard Butler: …included a cavalier cop in Den of Thieves, a submarine commander in Hunter Killer, and one of three lighthouse keepers who mysteriously vanish off a remote Scottish island in The Vanishing (original title Keepers).

  • Denakil Plain (region, Ethiopia-Eritrea)

    Denakil Plain, arid lowland of northern Ethiopia and southeastern Eritrea, bordering Djibouti. It lies at the northern extreme of the Great Rift Valley and the Awash River. Live volcanoes (often called the Denakil Alps) separate it from the Red Sea. Any water that comes into the plain evaporates

  • Denali (mountain, Alaska, United States)

    Denali, highest peak in North America. It is located near the centre of the Alaska Range, with two summits rising above the Denali Fault, in south-central Alaska, U.S. Denali’s official elevation figure of 20,310 feet (6,190 metres), established by the United States Geological Survey in September

  • Denali National Park and Preserve (national park, Alaska, United States)

    Denali National Park and Preserve, vast region with an unspoiled natural environment of alpine tundra and boreal forest (taiga) in south-central Alaska, U.S. It lies roughly equidistant from Fairbanks to the northeast and Anchorage to the south-southeast and is some 200 miles (320 km) south of the

  • denar (currency)

    North Macedonia: Finance: …Macedonia’s national currency is the denar. The National Bank of the Republic of North Macedonia is the bank of issue, authorizes bank licensing, and oversees a system composed of banks (some of which are permitted to conduct only domestic business) and “savings houses.” A large portion of capital in the…

  • Denard, Robert (French soldier)

    Bob Denard, (Gilbert Bourgeaud), French mercenary (born April 7, 1929, Bordeaux, France—died Oct. 13, 2007, Paris, France), participated in approximately 20 coups (or attempted coups) and civil wars across postcolonial Africa in Angola, Benin, Congo, Gabon, Nigeria, Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), and

  • Denard, Robert Heath (American engineer)

    Robert Dennard, American engineer credited with the invention of the one-transistor cell for dynamic random-access memory (DRAM) and with pioneering the set of consistent scaling principles that underlie the improved performance of increasingly miniaturized integrated circuits, two pivotal

  • denarius (ancient Roman unit of weight and coin)

    coin: Introduction of the denarius: Adjustment of the previously fluctuating relationship between bronze and silver was first secured by the issue about 211 bc of the silver denarius (marked X—i.e., 10 bronze asses), together with fractional coins, also of silver (marked V—i.e., five; and IIS—i.e., 2 12 asses—a sesterce,…

  • denarius aureus (ancient Roman money)

    Aureus, basic gold monetary unit of ancient Rome and the Roman world. It was first named nummus aureus (“gold money”), or denarius aureus, and was equal to 25 silver denarii; a denarius equaled 10 bronze asses. (In 89 bc, the sestertius, equal to one-quarter of a denarius, replaced the bronze ass

  • Denationalization of Money, The (work by Hayek)

    F.A. Hayek: Life and major works: …in the 1970s Hayek’s monograph The Denationalization of Money was published by the Institute of Economic Affairs in London, one of the many classical liberal think tanks that Hayek, directly or indirectly, had a hand in establishing.

  • denaturation (biology)

    Denaturation, in biology, process modifying the molecular structure of a protein. Denaturation involves the breaking of many of the weak linkages, or bonds (e.g., hydrogen bonds), within a protein molecule that are responsible for the highly ordered structure of the protein in its natural (native)

  • Denbigh (Wales, United Kingdom)

    Denbigh, market town, historic and present county of Denbighshire (Sir Ddinbych), northern Wales. It is situated just west of the River Clwyd, about 10 miles (16 km) south of Rhyl. After the English king Edward I conquered Wales, Henry de Lacy, 3rd earl of Lincoln, founded a borough there in 1283

  • Denbigh Castle (castle, Wales, United Kingdom)

    Denbighshire: …the county in 1645, and Denbigh Castle was one of the last Welsh strongholds to surrender to the Parliamentary forces, who razed it. The spread of Nonconformism (non-Anglican Protestantism) during the 18th century and the development of coastal resorts during the 19th century mark the later history of Denbighshire. During…

  • Denbighshire (county, Wales, United Kingdom)

    Denbighshire, county of northern Wales extending inland from the Irish Sea coast. The present county of Denbighshire includes the Vale of Clwyd along the River Clwyd and an inland area between the Clwydian Range in the east and the Clocaenog Forest in the west that ascends to the Berwyn mountains

  • Denby, Edwin (American politician)

    Teapot Dome Scandal: …the secretary of the navy, Edwin Denby, had signed all the leases, he was cleared of all charges.

  • Denby, Edwin (American dancer and poet)

    dance criticism: The 20th century: The American dancer and poet Edwin Denby, who from 1936 to 1942 wrote criticism for the influential magazine Modern Music (published 1924–46), proclaimed Balanchine “the greatest choreographer of our time.” Through his nuanced analyses Denby taught several generations of thoughtful theatregoers to see much more on dance stages than was…

  • Dench, Dame Judith Olivia (British actress)

    Judi Dench, British actress known for her numerous and varied stage roles and for her work in television and in a variety of films. Dench studied at the Central School of Speech Training and Dramatic Art in London. In 1957 she gave her first important critically acclaimed performance, as Ophelia in

  • Dench, Judi (British actress)

    Judi Dench, British actress known for her numerous and varied stage roles and for her work in television and in a variety of films. Dench studied at the Central School of Speech Training and Dramatic Art in London. In 1957 she gave her first important critically acclaimed performance, as Ophelia in

  • Denck, Hans (German religious leader)

    Hans Denck, German theologian and Reformer who opposed Lutheranism in favour of Anabaptism, the Reformation movement that stressed the baptism of individuals upon reaching adulthood. Denck became rector of St. Sebaldus School in Nürnberg in 1523 but was expelled from the city as a heretic two years

  • Denden Kōsha (Japanese company)

    Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT), Japanese telecommunications company that almost monopolizes Japan’s domestic electronic communications industry. It is Japan’s largest company and one of the largest companies in the world. NTT was established in 1952 as a public corporation and the

  • Dendera (Egypt)

    Dandarah, agricultural town on the west bank of the Nile, in Qinā mu?āfa?ah (governorate), Upper Egypt. The modern town is built on the ancient site of Ta-ynt-netert (She of the Divine Pillar), or Tentyra. It was the capital of the sixth nome (province) of pharaonic Upper Egypt and was dedicated to

  • Dendragapus obscurus (bird)

    grouse: …of evergreen forests is the blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), a big, dark bird, plainer and longer-tailed than the spruce grouse and heavier than the ruffed grouse.

  • DENDRAL (expert system)

    DENDRAL, an early expert system, developed beginning in 1965 by the artificial intelligence (AI) researcher Edward Feigenbaum and the geneticist Joshua Lederberg, both of Stanford University in California. Heuristic DENDRAL (later shortened to DENDRAL) was a chemical-analysis expert system. The

  • Dendraspis (snake)

    Mamba, (genus Dendroaspis), any of four species of large, arboreal, venomous snakes that live throughout sub-Saharan Africa in tropical rainforests and savannas. Mambas are slender, agile, and quick and are active during the day. They have smooth scales, flat-sided (coffin-shaped) heads, long front

  • Dendrelaphis punctulatus (reptile)

    tree snake: …few colubrid snakes is the green tree snake Dendrelaphis punctulatus, found in the northern and eastern regions, which has a tiny head and thin foreparts and may reach a length of 1.8 metres (5.9 feet). Flying snakes, mangrove snakes, vine snakes, and whip snakes are sometimes called tree snakes.

  • dendrimer (molecule)

    nanotechnology: Drug delivery: …these applications is an organic dendrimer. A dendrimer is a special class of polymeric molecule that weaves in and out from a hollow central region. These spherical “fuzz balls” are about the size of a typical protein but cannot unfold like proteins. Interest in dendrimers derives from the ability to…

  • dendrite (neuron)

    animal development: The brain and spinal cord: …produce outgrowths called axons and dendrites, by which the cells of the nervous system establish communication with one another to form a functional network. Some of the outgrowths extend beyond the confines of the brain and spinal cord as components of nerves; they establish contact with peripheral organs, which thus…

  • dendrite (crystal)

    mineral: Crystal habit and crystal aggregation: …small spherical or hemispherical groups; dendritic, in slender divergent branches, somewhat plantlike; mammillary, large smoothly rounded, masses resembling mammae, formed by radiating crystals; botryoidal, globular forms resembling a bunch of grapes; colloform, spherical forms composed of radiating individuals without regard to size (this includes botryoidal, reniform, and mammillary forms);

  • dendritic cell (biology)

    mononuclear phagocyte system: …precursors develop into monocytes and dendritic cells, phagocytic cells that are released into the bloodstream. Some monocytes and dendritic cells remain in the general blood circulation, but most of them enter body tissues. In tissues, monocytes develop into much larger phagocytic cells known as macrophages. The great majority of macrophages…

  • dendritic drainage pattern (geology)

    valley: Drainage patterns: Dendritic patterns (see figure), so called because of their similarity to branching organic forms, are most common where rocks or sediments are flat-lying and preferential zones of structural weakness are minimal. The conveyance properties of a dendritic network are analogous to blood circulation systems and…

  • dendritic keratitis (pathology)

    keratitis: In dendritic (branching) keratitis, or dendritic ulcer, the cornea is inflamed by infection with the herpes simplex (cold sore) virus or herpes zoster (shingles) virus. The lesions, as the name suggests, follow branching lines, along which minute blisters may form and break, leaving raw areas. The…

  • dendritic plaque (neurology)

    Alzheimer disease: Neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles: The presence of neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain are used to diagnose Alzheimer disease in autopsy. Neuritic plaques—also called senile, dendritic, or amyloid plaques—consist of deteriorating neuronal material surrounding deposits of a sticky protein called amyloid beta…

  • dendritic spine (anatomy)

    nervous system: Dendrites: …provided by specialized structures called dendritic spines, which, by providing discrete regions for the reception of nerve impulses, isolate changes in electrical current from the main dendritic trunk.

  • Dendroaspis (snake)

    Mamba, (genus Dendroaspis), any of four species of large, arboreal, venomous snakes that live throughout sub-Saharan Africa in tropical rainforests and savannas. Mambas are slender, agile, and quick and are active during the day. They have smooth scales, flat-sided (coffin-shaped) heads, long front

  • Dendroaspis angusticeps (snake)

    mamba: The East African green mamba (D. angusticeps) of East and South Africa, Jameson’s mamba (D. jamesoni) of Central Africa, and the West African green mamba (D. viridis) are all more timid than the black mamba and have not been reported to attack humans. Like the black…

  • Dendroaspis jamesoni (snake)

    mamba: …of East and South Africa, Jameson’s mamba (D. jamesoni) of Central Africa, and the West African green mamba (D. viridis) are all more timid than the black mamba and have not been reported to attack humans. Like the black mamba, they will flatten their necks into a narrow hood as…

  • Dendroaspis polylepis (snake)

    Black mamba, (Dendroaspis polylepis), species of mamba snake known for its large size, quickness, and extremely potent venom. It lives in sub-Saharan Africa and is one of the continent’s most dangerous snakes. The average black mamba is 2–2.5 metres (6.6–8.2 feet) long, with a maximum length of 4.3

  • Dendroaspis viridis (snake)

    mamba: …of Central Africa, and the West African green mamba (D. viridis) are all more timid than the black mamba and have not been reported to attack humans. Like the black mamba, they will flatten their necks into a narrow hood as a defensive posture. Green mambas prey upon birds, small…

  • Dendrobates (amphibian genus)

    Anura: Skin toxins: Dendrobates and Phyllobates are small, diurnal frogs living in Central and South America that are brilliantly coloured solid red, yellow, or orange or patterned with bold stripes or crossbars. These bright patterns are believed to act as warning colours to ward off predators. One nonpoisonous…

  • Dendrobates pumilio (amphibian)

    Anura: Breeding behaviour: The small Central American Dendrobates pumilio calls from the leaves of herbaceous plants. Intrusion into a territory of one calling male by another results in a wrestling match that terminates only after one male has been thrown off the leaf. Males of the Central American dendrobatid Colostethus inguinalis have…

  • dendrobatid (amphibian)

    Poison frog, (family Dendrobatidae), any of approximately 180 species of New World frogs characterized by the ability to produce extremely poisonous skin secretions. Poison frogs inhabit the forests of the New World tropics from Nicaragua to Peru and Brazil, and a few species are used by South

  • Dendrobatidae (amphibian)

    Poison frog, (family Dendrobatidae), any of approximately 180 species of New World frogs characterized by the ability to produce extremely poisonous skin secretions. Poison frogs inhabit the forests of the New World tropics from Nicaragua to Peru and Brazil, and a few species are used by South

  • Dendrobium (plant genus)

    Dendrobium, genus of as many as 1,500 species of epiphytic orchids (family Orchidaceae). Dendrobium species are native to tropical and subtropical Asia, many Pacific islands, and Australia. Many are cultivated as ornamentals, and some are important in the floral industry. Popular members of the

  • Dendrobium crumenatum (plant)

    Dendrobium: …of the genus include the pigeon orchid (Dendrobium crumenatum), a white-flowered species; the bull orchid (D. taurinum), a Philippine species with twisted, hornlike petals; and the cucumber orchid (D. cucumerinum), an Australian species with unusual, cucumber-like leaves.

  • Dendrobium cucumerinum (plant)

    Dendrobium: …twisted, hornlike petals; and the cucumber orchid (D. cucumerinum), an Australian species with unusual, cucumber-like leaves.

  • Dendrobium taurinum (plant)

    Dendrobium: …crumenatum), a white-flowered species; the bull orchid (D. taurinum), a Philippine species with twisted, hornlike petals; and the cucumber orchid (D. cucumerinum), an Australian species with unusual, cucumber-like leaves.

  • Dendrocalamus strictus (plant)

    bamboo: …of several bamboo species, especially Dendrocalamus strictus and Bambusa bambos, are used to make fine-quality paper. The jointed stems of bamboo have perhaps the most numerous uses; the largest stems supply planks for houses and rafts, while both large and small stems are lashed together to form the scaffoldings used…

  • Dendrocerotales (plant order)

    bryophyte: Annotated classification: Order Dendrocerotales Distributed primarily in tropical regions; containing 1 family with 4 genera, Dendroceros, Megaceros, Nothoceros, and Phaeomegaceros. Order Notothyladales Consists of a single family and about 5 genera, including Notothylas. Order

  • dendrochronology (paleontology)

    Dendrochronology, the scientific discipline concerned with dating and interpreting past events, particularly paleoclimates and climatic trends, based on the analysis of tree rings. Samples are obtained by means of an increment borer, a simple metal tube of small diameter that can be driven into a

  • Dendrocincla fuliginosa (bird)

    woodcreeper: …others of its genus, the plain-brown woodcreeper (Dendrocincla fuliginosa), of Honduras to northeastern Argentina, often follows marching ant columns, eating the insects and other creatures routed out by the ants. See also scythebill.

  • Dendrocnide (plant)

    Urticaceae: …wood nettles (Laportea), and the Australian stinging trees (Dendrocnide)—have stinging trichomes (plant hairs) that cause a painful rash upon contact. The long fibres in the stems of some species, such as ramie (Boehmeria nivea), are used in the textile industry.

  • Dendrocolaptes certhia (bird)

    woodcreeper: A typical form is the barred woodcreeper (Dendrocolaptes certhia), of southern Mexico to northern Brazil; it is 28 cm (11 inches) long, is heavy-billed, and has scalloped black markings. Xiphorhynchus woodcreepers, such as the ivory-billed woodcreeper (X. flavigaster) of Central America, are among the more prominently streaked woodcreepers. Like others…

  • Dendrocolaptidae (bird family)

    Dendrocolaptidae, songbird family, order Passeriformes, consisting of a number of brownish birds of the forest or brushland and found from Mexico through South America. Representative members are the scythebill and the woodcreeper

  • Dendrocolaptinae (bird)

    Woodcreeper, any of about 50 species of tropical American birds constituting the subfamily Dendrocolaptinae, family Furnariidae, order Passeriformes. Some authorities classify the birds as a separate family (Dendrocolaptidae). Woodcreepers work their way up the trunks of trees, probing the bark and

  • Dendrocopos major (bird)

    woodpecker: …of temperate North America; the great spotted woodpecker (D. major), about 23 cm (9 inches) long and found from the forests and gardens of western temperate Eurasia south to North Africa; and the hairy woodpecker (D. villosus), which is 20–25 cm (8–9.8 inches) long and found in temperate North America.

  • Dendrocopos pubescens (bird)

    woodpecker: …species of Dendrocopos include the downy woodpecker (D. pubescens), only about 15 cm (6 inches) long and inhabiting the woodlands and gardens of temperate North America; the great spotted woodpecker (D. major), about 23 cm (9 inches) long and found from the forests and gardens of western temperate Eurasia south…

  • Dendrocopos villosus (bird)

    woodpecker: …to North Africa; and the hairy woodpecker (D. villosus), which is 20–25 cm (8–9.8 inches) long and found in temperate North America.

  • Dendrocygna (bird)

    Whistling duck, (genus Dendrocygna), any of eight species of long-legged and long-necked ducks that utter sibilant cries and may make whirring wing sounds in flight; these distinctive ducks are separated from other members of the family Anatidae (order Anseriformes) as a tribe Dendrocygnini.

  • Dendrocygna bicolor (duck)

    whistling duck: …of the tribe is the fulvous tree duck (Dendrocygna bicolor), with isolated populations in North and South America, India, and Africa—a most unusual world distribution and, remarkably, without geographic variation. It is mallard-sized, with a rusty brown body, a white rump, and creamy stripes on the flanks.

  • Dendrocygnini (bird tribe)

    anseriform: Annotated classification: Subfamily Dendrocygninae (whistling ducks) 9 species in 2 genera widely distributed in the tropics and subtropics. Whistling voice. Relatively long-legged, with upright stance. Enclosed bony eye socket. Strongly patterned adult plumage; downy young with light stripe below eyes and around nape. Mature at one year. Mutual…

  • dendroglyph (art)

    Oceanic art and architecture: The southeast: …of monument was created: the dendroglyph, an engraving on a living tree trunk. Carved in the usual geometric style, dendroglyphs featured clan designs or made references to local myths. They were used to mark the graves of notable men or to indicate the perimeters of ceremonial grounds.

  • dendrogram (biology)

    Phylogenetic tree, a diagram showing the evolutionary interrelations of a group of organisms derived from a common ancestral form. The ancestor is in the tree “trunk”; organisms that have arisen from it are placed at the ends of tree “branches.” The distance of one group from the other groups i

  • Dendrohyrax (mammal)

    hyrax: The tree hyraxes (Dendrohyrax) are arboreal, solitary, and nocturnal. All are primarily vegetarian.

  • Dendroica (bird genus)

    wood warbler: Dendroica is the largest genus of wood warblers; this chiefly North American genus has 27 species, most of which have contrasting plumage, such as the black, white, and yellow of the myrtle warbler (D. coronata). A common but less-striking species is the blackpoll warbler (D.…

  • Dendroica coronata (bird)

    wood warbler: …white, and yellow of the myrtle warbler (D. coronata). A common but less-striking species is the blackpoll warbler (D. striata). Some authors merge Dendroica in Vermivora, a less-colourful genus of 11 species, most of them well known in the United States.

  • Dendroica kirtlandii (bird)

    conservation: Fire control: …both possible and essential is Kirtland’s warbler (Dendroica kirtlandii; see woodwarbler). This endangered species nests only in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, an exceptional case of a bird species with a tiny geographic range well outside the tropics. The bird places its nest in grasses and shrubs below living branches…

  • Dendroica petechia (bird)

    wood warbler: Best known is the yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), sometimes miscalled the wild canary, which breeds from Alaska and Newfoundland to the West Indies, Peru, and the Galapagos Islands; it is 13 cm (5 inches) long, and the males have faintly red-streaked underparts. Dendroica is the largest genus of wood…

  • Dendroica striata (bird)

    Blackpoll warbler, species of woodwarbler

  • dendrology (botany)

    Dendrology, study of the characteristics of trees, shrubs, lianas, and other woody plants. Dendrology is generally considered to be a branch of systematic botany or forestry and is primarily concerned with the taxonomy of woody species. Historically, dendrology also encompassed the natural history

  • Dendromecon harfordii (plant)

    tree poppy: The related island tree poppy (Dendromecon harfordii), endemic to the Channel Islands off the southern California coast, reaches a height of 6 metres (20 feet). Tree poppies are hardy as ornamentals only in areas with mild winters.

  • Dendromecon rigida (plant)

    Tree poppy, (Dendromecon rigida), shrub or small tree of the poppy family (Papaveraceae), native to chaparral areas of southern California and northwestern Mexico. The related island tree poppy (Dendromecon harfordii), endemic to the Channel Islands off the southern California coast, reaches a

  • Dendronotus frondosus (gastropod)

    nudibranch: …cold northern seas is the bushy-backed sea slug (Dendronotus frondosus), named for its stalked, lacy cerata. Occurring worldwide in warm seas are the blue sea slug (Glaucus marina, or G. atlanticus) and the doridacean nudibranchs such as Doris and Glossodoris. See gastropod.

  • Dendropanax arboreum (plant)

    Araliaceae: …several species, especially that of Dendropanax arboreum and several members of the genus Didymopanax, provides timber.

  • Dendropithecus (fossil primate genus)

    primate: Miocene: …number of other genera (Limnopithecus, Dendropithecus, Afropithecus, Kamoypithecus, and others) have been added to the family. The location of the actual ancestors of living hominoids remained mysterious until previously known specimens from Moroto Island, in Lake Victoria, were reexamined, and fresh material was discovered. In 1997 the description of a…

  • Dene (people)

    Northwest Territories: Population composition: …territorial population and include the Dene and the Métis. Concentrated in the Mackenzie valley area, the Dene belong to several tribes, all part of the Athabaskan language family. Tribal organization was never strong among the Dene, and small bands led by individuals chosen for their skill in the hunt were…

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