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  • Dead & Company (American musical group)

    John Mayer: …member of the touring band Dead & Company, which included some of the surviving members of the Grateful Dead.

  • Dead Again (film by Branagh)

    Emma Thompson: …more Branagh-directed films, the thriller Dead Again (1991), in which the couple played dual roles, and the sentimental comedy Peter’s Friends (1992).

  • Dead Aid: Why Aid Is Not Working and How There Is a Better Way for Africa (work by Moyo)

    Dambisa Moyo: While working full-time, she wrote Dead Aid: Why Aid Is Not Working and How There Is a Better Way for Africa (2009). The book, whose main title is an ironic reference to the Live Aid benefit concerts of 1985, argues that the large amounts of money donated by Western states…

  • Dead and the Living Sea, The (work by Rudnicki)

    Adolf Rudnicki: …?ywe i martwe morze (1952; The Dead and the Living Sea), these works offered a moving testament to the “nation of Polish Jews” and how they died during the Holocaust. In 1953 Rudnicki began publishing weekly essays in literary periodicals, later collected in several volumes of Niebieskie kartki (1956–58; “Blue…

  • Dead and the Living, The (poetry by Olds)

    Sharon Olds: In The Dead and the Living (1984), which received several major poetry awards, she refined her poetic voice. Her poems honouring the dead encompass both family members and victims of political violence; those addressed to the living continue to examine the life of the body. She…

  • Dead Babies (novel by Amis)

    Martin Amis: …of his literary career included Dead Babies (1974), Success (1978), Other People (1981), The Information (1995), and Night Train (1997).

  • Dead Cert (novel by Francis)

    Dick Francis: …with a successful first novel, Dead Cert (filmed 1974). Thereafter he averaged a book a year, all set in the world of horse racing. His books usually feature an amateur sleuth who uses classic deductive reasoning to solve the central mystery and who becomes emotionally involved with the case. The…

  • Dead Christ Supported by Angels (painting by Bellini)

    Giovanni Bellini: …Crucifixion, a Transfiguration, and a Dead Christ Supported by Angels. Several pictures of the same or earlier date are in the United States, and others are at the Correr Civic Museum in Venice. Four triptychs, sets of three panels used as altarpieces, are still in the Venice Accademia, and two…

  • Dead Christ with Angels (painting by Rosso Fiorentino)

    Rosso Fiorentino: His Dead Christ with Angels (c. 1526) exemplifies this new style with its feeling for rarefied beauty and subdued emotion. Fleeing from the sack of the city in 1527, he worked briefly in several central Italian towns. By 1530 Rosso was in Venice but desired to…

  • Dead Don’t Die, The (film by Jarmusch [2019])

    Jim Jarmusch: …the zombie movie genre with The Dead Don’t Die (2019).

  • Dead End (play by Sartre)

    No Exit, one-act philosophical drama by Jean-Paul Sartre, performed in 1944 and published in 1945. Its original, French title, Huis clos, is sometimes also translated as In Camera or Dead End. The play proposes that “hell is other people” rather than a state created by God. The play begins with a

  • Dead End (film by Wyler [1937])

    William Wyler: Films of the 1930s: …Kingsley’s socially conscious Broadway drama Dead End (1937). Adapted by Hellman, it featured Humphrey Bogart as a gangster and introduced filmgoers to the Dead End Kids, a group of young actors who reprised their stage roles as the members of a neighbourhood gang and would do so again in a…

  • Dead End Kids (American actors)

    William Wyler: Films of the 1930s: …and introduced filmgoers to the Dead End Kids, a group of young actors who reprised their stage roles as the members of a neighbourhood gang and would do so again in a number of subsequent films. The film, cinematographer Toland, and Claire Trevor (best supporting actress) were nominated for Academy…

  • Dead End: The Bowery (work by Siskind)

    Aaron Siskind: …series of the period, Siskind’s Dead End: The Bowery and Harlem Document show as much concern for pure design as for the plight of his subjects. After the late 1930s, Siskind no longer photographed people, concentrating instead on architectural photography, as in his series Old Houses of Bucks County, and…

  • Dead Father, The (novel by Barthelme)

    American literature: Realism and metafiction: … (1967) and Freudian fiction in The Dead Father (1975). Barthelme was most successful in his short stories and parodies that solemnly caricatured contemporary styles, especially the richly suggestive pieces collected in Unspeakable Practices, Unnatural Acts (1968), City Life (1970), and Guilty Pleasures (1974).

  • dead furrow (agriculture)

    agricultural technology: Primary tillage equipment: …of one bottom, called a dead furrow. When land is broken by continuous lapping of furrows, it is called flat broken. If land is broken in alternate back furrows and dead furrows, it is said to be bedded or listed.

  • Dead Hand (nuclear weapon launch system)

    doomsday machine: …automated system, known as the Dead Hand, was allegedly designed to launch nuclear missiles at U.S. targets if it detected a nuclear attack on Moscow and if communications links with top military commanders were cut (indicating that the commanders had been killed). The existence of a semiautomated version of the…

  • Dead Hand, A (novel by Theroux)

    Paul Theroux: A Dead Hand (2009) is a crime novel set in India. The Lower River (2012) chronicles an elderly man’s return to the Malawian village where he had served as a Peace Corps volunteer in his youth. The satirical Mother Land (2017) centres on a dysfunctional…

  • Dead Hand: The Untold Story of the Cold War Arms Race and Its Dangerous Legacy, The (work by Hoffman)

    doomsday machine: …formerly secret documentary evidence in The Dead Hand: The Untold Story of the Cold War Arms Race and Its Dangerous Legacy (2010), by the American journalist David Hoffman, which received the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for General Nonfiction.

  • Dead Kennedys (American rock group)

    punk: …Seattle, Washington; San Francisco (the Dead Kennedys); and Los Angeles (X and Black Flag). In the late 1970s, however, punk in the United States was eclipsed by disco and went underground in movements such as hardcore, which flourished from the early to mid-1980s and further accelerated punk’s breakneck tempo. Punk’s…

  • dead language

    language: Written versus spoken languages: In studying ancient (dead) languages one is, of course, limited to studying the grammar of their written forms and styles, as their written records alone survive. Such is the case with Latin, Ancient Greek, and Sanskrit (Latin lives as a spoken language in very restricted situations, such…

  • Dead Lecturer, The (work by Baraka)

    The Dead Lecturer, collection of verse by Amiri Baraka, published in 1964 under the name LeRoi Jones. The collection marked a separation for Baraka from the style and literary philosophy of the Beats, with whom he had previously been associated. In the poem “Rhythm & Blues” he used the structures

  • dead load

    bridge: Live load and dead load: The primary function of a bridge is to carry traffic loads: heavy trucks, cars, and trains. Engineers must estimate the traffic loading. On short spans, it is possible that the maximum conceivable load will be achieved—that is to say, on spans of less…

  • Dead Man (film by Jarmusch [1995])

    Jim Jarmusch: Jarmusch’s later movies included Dead Man (1995), in which he offered his own take on the western; Year of the Horse (1997), a rock concert documentary of Neil Young and Crazy Horse; and Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai (1999). Coffee and Cigarettes (2003) consisted of a collection…

  • Dead Man Walking (film by Robbins [1995])

    Tim Robbins: … nomination for best director for Dead Man Walking (1995), starring Sarandon as Sister Helen Prejean, a nun who worked with death row inmates.

  • Dead Man Walking: An Eyewitness Account of the Death Penalty in the United States (work by Prejean)

    Sister Helen Prejean: Her first book, Dead Man Walking: An Eyewitness Account of the Death Penalty in the United States (1994), narrated her experiences as a spiritual adviser to two condemned men, Sonnier and Robert Willie, both of whom she accompanied to the death chamber. The book described her early years…

  • Dead Man’s Hand (poker hand)

    Wild Bill Hickok: Final years: …card—became known as the “Dead Man’s Hand.”

  • Dead Man, The (work by Chagall)

    Marc Chagall: Early life and works: …early maturity are the nightmarish The Dead Man (1908), which depicts a roof violinist (a favourite motif), and My Fiancée with Black Gloves (1909), in which a portrait becomes an occasion for the artist to experiment with arranging black and white.

  • Dead Men Don’t Wear Plaid (film by Reiner [1982])

    Carl Reiner: Film directing: …was the black-and-white film-noir parody Dead Men Don’t Wear Plaid (1982), in which a private eye (Martin) interacts, through old film clips, with characters from a number of 1940s classics, including Barbara Stanwyck, Humphrey Bogart, and Ava Gardner. The movie, which featured a script by Reiner, Martin, and George Gipe,…

  • dead nettle (plant)

    Lamiaceae: …genus Lamium are known as dead nettles; they are low weedy plants that are sometimes cultivated as medicinal plants.

  • Dead of Night (British film [1945])

    Dead of Night, British horror anthology film, released in 1945, that is considered a classic of the genre. Of the movie’s five segments, arguably the most notable is the episode featuring a tormented ventriloquist. Dead of Night opens with architect Walter Craig (played by Mervyn Johns) being

  • Dead of Winter (film by Penn [1987])

    Arthur Penn: Films of the 1980s and later work: Dead of Winter (1987), based on Joseph H. Lewis’s 1945 film noir My Name Is Julia Ross and starring Mary Steenburgen as the woman being held prisoner in a spooky mansion, was better. Penn & Teller Get Killed (1989), a marriage of black humour and…

  • Dead Pigeon on Beethoven Street (film by Fuller [1973])

    Samuel Fuller: Films of the 1960s and ’70s: …Taube in der Beethovenstrasse (1973; Dead Pigeon on Beethoven Street) was shot for West German television as an episode of the crime series Tatort. Glenn Corbett starred as a private eye in the Raymond Chandler vein who is hired by a woman played by Christa Lang. (Lang was Fuller’s real-life…

  • Dead Poets Society (film by Weir [1989])

    Peter Weir: …acclaim with films such as Dead Poets Society (1989), a drama set in a boys’ preparatory school in the 1950s, The Truman Show (1998), a fable about the tyranny of the media, and Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (2003), a seafaring epic based on the series…

  • Dead Reckoning (film by Cromwell [1947])

    John Cromwell: From The Prisoner of Zenda to Caged: Dead Reckoning (1947) was a change of pace for Cromwell. The film noir starred Humphrey Bogart as a war hero who is betrayed by a femme fatale (Lizabeth Scott).

  • dead reckoning (navigation)

    Dead reckoning, determination without the aid of celestial navigation of the position of a ship or aircraft from the record of the courses sailed or flown, the distance made (which can be estimated from velocity), the known starting point, and the known or estimated drift. Some marine navigators

  • Dead Republic, The (novel by Doyle)

    Roddy Doyle: …through the United States, and The Dead Republic (2010), which chronicles his return to Ireland. In Smile (2017) a lonely middle-aged man looks back on his life, especially his troubled childhood. The Deportees (2007) and Bullfighting (2011) are short-story collections. Doyle also wrote a number of books for children, including…

  • Dead Ringers (film by Cronenberg [1988])

    Dead Ringers, Canadian film, a psychological thriller about twin gynecologists who gradually descend into madness, that is considered one of director David Cronenberg’s best films. Regarded by many as one of the best horror movies ever made, it won 10 Genie Awards from the Academy of Canadian

  • Dead Sea (lake, Asia)

    Dead Sea, landlocked salt lake between Israel and Jordan in southwestern Asia. Its eastern shore belongs to Jordan, and the southern half of its western shore belongs to Israel. The northern half of the western shore lies within the Palestinian West Bank and has been under Israeli occupation since

  • Dead Sea community (Jewish sect)

    Qumrān: …north of the waterway Wadi Qumrān, have revealed the ruins of buildings, believed by some scholars to have been occupied by a community of Essenes, who have been posited as the owners of the Scrolls.

  • Dead Sea Scrolls

    Dead Sea Scrolls, ancient, mostly Hebrew, manuscripts (of leather, papyrus, and copper) first found in 1947 on the northwestern shore of the Dead Sea. Discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls is among the more important finds in the history of modern archaeology. Study of the scrolls has enabled scholars

  • Dead Souls (novel by Gogol)

    Dead Souls, novel by Nikolay Gogol, published in Russian as Myortvye dushi in 1842. This picaresque work, considered one of the world’s finest satires, traces the adventures of the landless social-climbing Pavel Ivanovich Chichikov, a dismissed civil servant out to seek his fortune. It is admired

  • dead time (measurement interval)

    radiation measurement: Counting systems: …is the concept known as dead time. Following each event in a detector, there is a period of time in which the measurement system is processing that event and is insensitive to other events. Because radiation events typically occur randomly distributed in time, there is always some chance that a…

  • Dead to Me (American television series)

    Ed Asner: …the Sunset Strip (2006–07) and Dead to Me (2019– )—along with occasional feature film roles, including one as Santa Claus in the 2003 movie Elf. He voiced the role of Carl Fredricksen, the lead character in the Academy Award-winning animated movie Up (2009), and revisited his role as Santa Claus…

  • Dead Toreador, The (painting by Manet)

    bullfighting: Bullfighting and the arts: …Manet often painted taurine themes, The Dead Toreador (1864) being perhaps his most famous example. Pablo Picasso began drawing bullfights as a boy in Málaga, Spain, and continued to depict taurine subjects in his mature art. John Fulton, the North American matador promoted to the corrida’s highest rank in Spain,…

  • dead water (hydrology)

    wave: Internal waves: …may cause internal waves (dead water) if there is a shallow brackish upper layer.

  • Dead Weather, the (American rock group)

    the White Stripes: …the Stone Age, Jack formed the Dead Weather, a bluesy psychedelic rock combo whose debut album, Horehound, was released in July 2009.

  • Dead Yesterdays (work by Ginzburg)

    Natalia Ginzburg: title, A Light for Fools), Ginzburg portrayed the crises of the Italian younger generation during the fascist period. Lessico famigliare (1963; Family Sayings) is a novelistic memoir of her upbringing and career. Ginzburg’s novels of the 1970s and ’80s pessimistically explore the dissolution of family ties…

  • dead zone (geology)

    sand dune: Formation and growth of dunes: …from the surface leaving a “dead zone” in the lee into which falls the sand brought up the windward slope. When this depositional slope is steepened to the angle of repose of dry sand (about 32°), this angle is maintained and the added sand slips down the slope or slip…

  • dead zone (ecology and oceanography)

    water pollution: Groundwater and oceans: …the seasonal formation of “dead zones” (i.e., hypoxic areas, where dissolved oxygen levels drop so low that most higher forms of aquatic life vanish) in certain coastal areas. The cause is nutrient enrichment from dispersed agricultural runoff and concomitant algal blooms. Dead zones occur worldwide; one of the largest…

  • Dead Zone, The (film by Cronenberg [1983])

    David Cronenberg: Rabid, The Fly, and Crash: Beginning with The Dead Zone (1983), a straightforward adaptation of a horror novel by Stephen King, Cronenberg moved closer to the mainstream. The gory horror remake The Fly (1986), in which a scientist gradually metamorphoses into an enormous grotesque insect, was widely considered superior to the 1958…

  • Dead Zone, The (novel by King)

    Stephen King: …Stand (1978; TV miniseries 1994); The Dead Zone (1979; film 1983; TV series 2002–07); Firestarter (1980; film 1984); Cujo (1981; film 1983); The Running Man (1982; film 1987); Christine (1983; film 1983); Thinner (1984; film 1996);

  • dead, cult of the (religion)

    ancient Egyptian religion: The world of the dead: The majority of evidence from ancient Egypt comes from funerary monuments and burials of royalty, of the elite, and, for the Late period, of animals; relatively little is known of the mortuary practices of the mass of the population. Reasons for…

  • dead, lantern of the (architecture)

    Lantern of the dead, small stone structure with windows in the upper part, in which lamps were placed to mark the position of a cemetery at night. Their use, which seems limited to western and central France, is probably owing to a traditional survival of primitive Celtic rather than Christian

  • Dead, Street of the (street, Teotihuacán, Mexico)

    Teotihuacán: …130-foot- (40-metre-) wide road, the Avenue of the Dead (“Calle de los Muertos”), that stretches 1.5 miles (2.4 km); oriented slightly east of true north, it points directly at the nearby sacred peak of Cerro Gordo. The Avenue of the Dead was once erroneously thought to have been lined with…

  • Dead, The (American rock group)

    Grateful Dead: …2003 the band dubbed itself the Dead (dropping “Grateful” out of respect for Garcia) and added former Allman Brothers Band guitarist Warren Haynes to the lineup the following year. Personality conflicts surfaced during the 2004 tour season, however, and a four-year hiatus for the band followed. The Dead reunited in…

  • Dead, The (film by Huston [1987])

    John Huston: Last films: …would be his final movie, The Dead (Anjelica acted in it, and Tony was nominated for an Academy Award for his screenplay). Based on the short story “The Dead” from James Joyce’s Dubliners, the film focused on a holiday party hosted by a pair of elderly sisters and their niece…

  • Dead, The (story by Joyce)

    The Dead, short story by James Joyce, appearing in 1914 in his collection Dubliners. It is considered his best short work and a masterpiece of modern fiction. The story takes place before, during, and after an evening Christmas party attended by Gabriel and Gretta Conroy and their friends and

  • dead-annealed glass

    industrial glass: Lamination: …although a single ply of dead-annealed glass as thick as 20 to 25 millimetres is used in some applications. The reason for having dead-annealed glass is the absence of tension in the interior; internal tension would cause the glass to shatter upon impact of the first bullet, thereby rendering the…

  • dead-ball era (baseball history)

    baseball: League formation: …also known as the “dead-ball era”). The inside game was a style of play that emphasized pitching, speed, and batsmanship. Bunting was very common, and doubles and triples were more heralded than home runs (which during this era were almost exclusively of the inside-the-park variety). Two managers were credited…

  • dead-band (measurement)

    chromatography: Detector characteristics: The dead-band is that region of the signal in which the system does not respond to small changes in the amount of solute; there is “slack” in the system. Such imprecision becomes insignificant, however, if sample injection is not instantaneous. The injected sample must not reside…

  • dead-beat escapement (watch mechanism)

    George Graham: …1695, and also perfected the dead-beat escapement, developed by Richard Towneley and Tompion in the mid-1670s. In 1721 Graham invented the temperature-compensated mercury pendulum, which was extensively adopted in the trade. In fact, when combined with the dead-beat escapement, such high-grade clocks were not surpassed in accuracy for more than…

  • dead-reckoning position (navigation)

    dead reckoning: …marine navigators differentiate between the dead-reckoning position, for which they use the course steered and their estimated speed through the water, and the estimated position, which is the dead-reckoning position corrected for effects of current, wind, and other factors. Because the uncertainty of dead reckoning increases over time and maybe…

  • Deadeye Dick (novel by Vonnegut)

    Kurt Vonnegut: His later novels include Deadeye Dick (1982), which revisits characters and settings from Breakfast of Champions; Galápagos (1985), a fantasy of human evolution told from a detached future perspective; Bluebeard (1987), the fictional autobiography of an aging painter; Hocus Pocus (1990), about a college professor turned prison warden; and…

  • deadfall (animal trap)

    American Subarctic peoples: Production and technology: …small game such as rabbits; deadfalls (traps with logs or other weights that fall on game and kill them); pit traps; and decoys for birds. Vehicles were also vital, as people depended heavily on mobility for survival; these included bark canoes, hardwood toboggans, and travel aids such as large sinew-netted…

  • Deadliest Tsunami, The

    On Dec. 26, 2004, at 7:59 Am local time, an undersea earthquake with a magnitude of 9.0 struck off the coast of the Indonesian island of Sumatra. (See Earth Sciences: Geophysics.) Over the next seven hours, a tsunami—a series of immense ocean waves— triggered by the quake reached out across the

  • Deadline— USA (film by Brooks [1952])

    Richard Brooks: Early films: Deadline—USA (1952) was a significant step forward, using Brooks’s newspaper background to provide Humphrey Bogart with one of his better late films. After a string of indifferent movies, Brooks had his first major success with Blackboard Jungle (1955). Based on a popular novel by Evan…

  • Deadlock (novel by Paretsky)

    Sara Paretsky: Warshawski novels, such as Deadlock (1984) and Killing Orders (1985), the sleuth becomes the target of violence and learns of conspiracies involving big business, organized crime, and (in Killing Orders) the Roman Catholic church. Paretsky explored social issues in many of her books, including Bitter Medicine (1987), which deals…

  • deadlock (computing)

    computer science: Parallel and distributed computing: …concurrency control are known as deadlocks and race conditions. Deadlock occurs when a resource held indefinitely by one process is requested by two or more other processes simultaneously. As a result, none of the processes that call for the resource can continue; they are deadlocked, waiting for the resource to…

  • Deadly Companions, The (film by Peckinpah [1961])

    Sam Peckinpah: First films: …as a film director with The Deadly Companions (1961), a low-budget western that starred Brian Keith as a former cavalry officer who, after accidentally killing a young boy, accompanies the funeral procession through hostile Apache territory. Next came the elegiac Ride the High Country (1962), about two former lawmen (played…

  • deadly embrace (computing)

    computer science: Parallel and distributed computing: …concurrency control are known as deadlocks and race conditions. Deadlock occurs when a resource held indefinitely by one process is requested by two or more other processes simultaneously. As a result, none of the processes that call for the resource can continue; they are deadlocked, waiting for the resource to…

  • Deadly Is the Female (film by Lewis [1950])

    Joseph H. Lewis: …to United Artists to make Gun Crazy (also known as Deadly Is the Female), a tale of sexual obsession and the thrill of violence. The classic B-film, which was considered ahead of its time, was based on the exploits of Bonnie and Clyde and featured a script cowritten by Dalton…

  • deadly nightshade (plant)

    Belladonna, (Atropa belladonna), tall bushy herb of the nightshade family (Solanaceae), the source of the crude drug of the same name. The highly poisonous plant is a native of wooded or waste areas in central and southern Eurasia. It grows to about 1.5 metres (4–5 feet) tall and has dull green

  • Deadly Tower, The (film [1975])

    Kurt Russell: …acclaim for two TV movies: The Deadly Tower (1975), in which he portrayed Charles Whitman, a mass murderer responsible for the attack known as the Texas Tower shooting of 1966, and Elvis (1979), a biopic about the legendary performer. The latter was directed by John Carpenter, and the duo collaborated…

  • Deadmau5 (Canadian music producer)

    Deadmau5, Canadian electronic dance music (EDM) producer and performer who was at the forefront of the revitalization of that genre in the 2000s. Zimmerman took piano lessons as a child and grew up with a keen interest in video games and computers. As a teenager he started making music with old

  • Deadpool (film by Miller [2016])

    Ryan Reynolds: Hollywood career: (2013), Self/less (2015), and Deadpool (2016). The latter film was a blockbuster hit, and Reynolds subsequently starred in and cowrote the sequel, Deadpool 2 (2018). He also appeared in such thrillers as Buried (2010), in which he played an American contractor entombed in a coffin in Iraq; Safe House…

  • Deadpool 2 (film by Leitch [2018])

    Ryan Reynolds: Hollywood career: …in and cowrote the sequel, Deadpool 2 (2018). He also appeared in such thrillers as Buried (2010), in which he played an American contractor entombed in a coffin in Iraq; Safe House (2012), about a CIA agent trying to protect a criminal (played by Denzel Washington); and 6 Underground (2019),…

  • Deadwater (Maine, United States)

    Orono, town, Penobscot county, east-central Maine, U.S. It lies along the Penobscot River 8 miles (13 km) northeast of Bangor. Settled about 1775, it was known as Deadwater and Stillwater Plantation before it was incorporated under its present name honouring Joseph Orono, a Penobscot Indian chief

  • deadweight (ship design)

    ship: Hydrostatics: …form a total known as deadweight. To deadweight must be added the weight of the ship’s structure, propulsion machinery, hull engineering (nonpropulsive machinery), and outfit (fixed items having to do with crew life support). These categories of weight are known collectively as lightship weight. The sum of deadweight and lightship…

  • deadweight tonnage (nautical science)

    tonnage: Deadweight tonnage is a measurement of total contents of a ship including cargo, fuel, crew, passengers, food, and water aside from boiler water. It is expressed in long tons of 2,240 pounds (1,016.0469088 kilograms).

  • Deadwood (South Dakota, United States)

    Deadwood, city, seat (1877) of Lawrence county, western South Dakota, U.S. Located just northeast of Lead and about 40 miles (65 km) northwest of Rapid City, Deadwood lies in a canyon formed by Whitewood Creek in the northern Black Hills, more than 4,530 feet (1,380 metres) above sea level. Built

  • Deadwood (American television series)

    HBO: …a dysfunctional family-run mortuary business; Deadwood (2004–06), a gritty western; True Blood (2008–14), about a small Louisiana town teeming with vampires, werewolves, and shape-shifters; and Game of Thrones (2011–19), based on American author George R.R. Martin’s series of fantasy books. Those shows paved the way for other television dramas with

  • deaf history

    History of the deaf, the experience and education of deaf persons and the development of deaf communities and culture through time. The history of deaf people (those affected by varying degrees of deafness) has been written as a history of hearing perceptions of deaf people, as a history of the

  • Deaf Un, the (British boxer)

    James Burke, British bare-knuckle fighter who was the English heavyweight champion from 1833 to 1839. Burke, who was hearing impaired from infancy, worked on the River Thames as a waterman before beginning his boxing career. He began fighting professionally in 1828. In the 1833 title fight between

  • deaf, history of the

    History of the deaf, the experience and education of deaf persons and the development of deaf communities and culture through time. The history of deaf people (those affected by varying degrees of deafness) has been written as a history of hearing perceptions of deaf people, as a history of the

  • deaf-blindness (medicine)

    Deaf-blindness, disability in which an individual has both a hearing impairment and a visual impairment. Deaf-blind individuals form a highly heterogeneous group, in which hearing and visual impairments are expressed to varying degrees. An individual is diagnosed with a hearing impairment if he or

  • deaf-mutism (pathology)

    speech disorder: Speech of the hard of hearing: Deaf children have traditionally been educated in special schools for the deaf, where the oral method (showing how to shape the oral structures for each speech sound) of teaching speech has competed with the older manual method of allowing the deaf to communicate through their…

  • deafness

    Deafness, partial or total inability to hear. The two principal types of deafness are conduction deafness and nerve deafness. In conduction deafness, there is interruption of the sound vibrations in their passage from the outer world to the nerve cells in the inner ear. The obstacle may be earwax

  • deafness on Martha’s Vineyard

    Deafness on Martha’s Vineyard, phenomenon in which a disproportionate percentage of the population living on Martha’s Vineyard, an island off the southeastern coast of Massachusetts, U.S., was affected by a hereditary form of deafness. The overall rate of Vineyard deafness peaked in the 19th

  • Deagan, J. C. (American musician)

    marimba: …the early 20th century by J.C. Deagan and U.G. Leedy. It is a tube-resonated instrument pitched an octave below the orchestral xylophone; its range varies, but 312octaves upward from the C below middle C is common. Players may hold two sticks in each hand to play up to four notes…

  • Deak & Company

    Nicholas L. Deak: In 1939 he founded Deak & Company, but he closed the operation in 1942, when he joined the U.S. Army. He became a U.S. citizen in 1943 and eventually a senior intelligence officer in the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), the forerunner of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA).

  • Deák Party (Hungarian politics)

    Hungary: Hungary under dualism: …Compromise, then known as the Deák Party, held office first but soon got into such financial and personal difficulties that complete chaos threatened. It was averted when in 1875 Kálmán Tisza, the leader of the moderate nationalist Left Centre, merged his party with the remnants of the Deákists on a…

  • Deák, Ferenc (Hungarian statesman)

    Ferenc Deák, Hungarian statesman whose negotiations led to the establishment of the dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary in 1867. Deák was the son of a wealthy Hungarian landowner. After graduating in law, he entered the administrative service of his county of Zala, which in 1833 sent him to represent

  • Deak, Nicholas L. (American banker)

    Nicholas L. Deak, banker and founder of an internationally renowned retail currency-exchange service and dealer in precious metals. Deak received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Neuchatel, Switzerland, in 1929. He worked with the Hungarian Trade Institute (1930–35) and with the British

  • Deak, Nicholas Louis (American banker)

    Nicholas L. Deak, banker and founder of an internationally renowned retail currency-exchange service and dealer in precious metals. Deak received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Neuchatel, Switzerland, in 1929. He worked with the Hungarian Trade Institute (1930–35) and with the British

  • Deakin, Alfred (prime minister of Australia)

    Alfred Deakin, prime minister of Australia (1903–04, 1905–08, 1909–10), who shaped many of the policies of the new commonwealth, especially those dealing with restriction of nonwhite immigration, social welfare, and protection of domestic industry. In 1880 Deakin entered the legislative assembly in

  • Deakin, Arthur (British labour leader)

    Arthur Deakin, leader of British trade unionism in the decade after World War II. A cobbler’s son, Deakin began work at age 13 in a South Wales steel plant, becoming an active trade unionist during World War I and a full-time union official in 1919. In 1932 he was appointed national secretary of

  • Deal (England, United Kingdom)

    Deal, town (parish), Dover district, administrative and historic county of Kent, eastern England. It is situated on the Strait of Dover, about 9 miles (14 km) northeast of Dover. The town has a natural roadstead harbour, the Downs, enclosed by the North and South Forelands and the perilous Goodwin

  • Deal galley punt (watercraft)

    boat: Northern Europe and Britain: …noted English type was the Deal galley punt, a square-sterned, lapstrake open boat rigged with a single dipping lugsail and once used for salvage and rescue work off the beach. The cat was a larger lugger of two or three masts used at Deal; both types were very seaworthy and…

  • Deal in Wheat, A (short story by Norris)

    A Deal in Wheat, short story by Frank Norris, first published serially in 1902 and then in the book A Deal in Wheat and Other Stories of the New and Old West, published posthumously in 1903. Employing the techniques of naturalism, the five-part story examines the business of wheat speculation at

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