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  • Day with Mussolini, A (photograph by Man)

    history of photography: Photojournalism: Examples are Man’s A Day with Mussolini, first published in the Münchner Illustrierte Presse (1931) and then, with a brilliant new layout, in Picture Post; Smith’s Spanish Village (1951) and Nurse Midwife (1951) in Life; and Eisenstaedt’s informal, penetrating portraits of famous Britons, also in Life. Images by…

  • Day, Arthur L. (American geophysicist)

    Arthur L. Day, U.S. geophysicist known for his studies of the properties of rocks and minerals at very high and very low temperatures. He investigated hot springs and earthquakes, the absolute measurement of high temperatures, and physical and chemical problems regarding volcanoes. Day was with the

  • Day, Arthur Louis (American geophysicist)

    Arthur L. Day, U.S. geophysicist known for his studies of the properties of rocks and minerals at very high and very low temperatures. He investigated hot springs and earthquakes, the absolute measurement of high temperatures, and physical and chemical problems regarding volcanoes. Day was with the

  • Day, Benjamin Henry (American journalist and publisher)

    Benjamin Henry Day, American printer and journalist who founded the New York Sun, the first of the “penny” newspapers in the United States. Starting in 1824 as a printer’s apprentice of the Springfield (Massachusetts) Republican, Day moved to New York City and opened his own printing business in

  • Day, Clarence (American author)

    Clarence Day, American writer whose greatest popular success was his autobiographical Life with Father. Educated at St. Paul’s School, Concord, New Hampshire, and at Yale University (A.B., 1896), Day became a member of the New York Stock Exchange in 1897 and joined his father’s brokerage firm as a

  • Day, Clarence Shepard (American author)

    Clarence Day, American writer whose greatest popular success was his autobiographical Life with Father. Educated at St. Paul’s School, Concord, New Hampshire, and at Yale University (A.B., 1896), Day became a member of the New York Stock Exchange in 1897 and joined his father’s brokerage firm as a

  • Day, Corinne (British photographer)

    Kate Moss: …her—taken by the British photographer Corinne Day—were published in the youth style magazine The Face. At that time the fashion industry was populated by supermodels who were famous for their statuesque and curvaceous frames and traditionally glamorous images. With her more natural look, street style, and slight build—at five feet…

  • Day, Doris (American singer and actress)

    Doris Day, American singer and motion-picture actress whose performances in movie musicals of the 1950s and sex comedies of the early 1960s made her a leading Hollywood star. While still a teenager, she changed her last name to Day when she began singing on radio. She worked as a vocalist in the

  • Day, Dorothy (American journalist)

    Dorothy Day, American journalist and Roman Catholic reformer, cofounder of the Catholic Worker newspaper, and an important lay leader in its associated activist movement. While a student at the University of Illinois on a scholarship (1914–16), Day read widely among socialist authors and soon

  • Day, Jason (Australian golfer)

    Jason Day, Jason Day ended the 2016 PGA Tour season as the top-ranked player in the world, but he came up short in his bid for his first FedEx Cup owing to a lingering back injury. It was another extremely successful year for Day, though, as he also tied for the most wins on the PGA Tour for the

  • Day, John (English dramatist)

    John Day, Elizabethan dramatist whose verse allegory The Parliament of Bees shows unusual ingenuity and delicacy of imagination. Day was expelled from the University of Cambridge in 1593 for theft, and after 1598 he became a playwright for the theatre proprietor and manager Philip Henslowe. In this

  • Day, Laraine (American actress)

    Laraine Day, (La Raine Johnson), American actress (born Oct. 13, 1920, Roosevelt, Utah—died Nov. 10, 2007, Ivins, Utah), portrayed decent and steadfast women in Hollywood films of the 1940s, but her most memorable role was that of Mary Lamont, the beloved nurse in seven Dr. Kildare movies. Though

  • Day, Leon (American baseball player)

    Leon Day, U.S. baseball player (born Oct. 30, 1916, Alexandria, Va.—died March 13, 1995, Baltimore, Md.), was a phenomenal right-handed pitcher whose fastball and change-up pitches secured his place as a strikeout artist; he held the strikeout record in the Negro National League, the Puerto Rican L

  • Day, Mary (American dance teacher and artistic director)

    Mary Day, American dance teacher and artistic director (born Jan. 25, 1910, Washington, D.C.—died July 11, 2006, Washington, D.C.), cofounded (with Lisa Gardiner) in 1944 the Washington School of Ballet, which attracted students from throughout the country and turned out such illustrious talents a

  • Day, Richard (American art director)
  • Day, Sandra (United States jurist)

    Sandra Day O’Connor, associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1981 to 2006. She was the first woman to serve on the Supreme Court. A moderate conservative, she was known for her dispassionate and meticulously researched opinions. Sandra Day grew up on a large family ranch

  • Day, Sir Robin (British journalist)

    Sir Robin Day, British broadcast journalist (born Oct. 24, 1923, London, Eng.—died Aug. 7, 2000, London), gained the label “grand inquisitor” for his technique in political interviews, in which he asked pointed questions and probed relentlessly for nonevasive answers, in contrast to the t

  • Day, Stephen (American printer)

    Stephen Day, founder of the first printing press in England’s North American colonies. Day himself does not seem to have been a printer. He was a locksmith in Cambridge, Eng., and, in 1638, contracted with the Reverend Jose Glover, a wealthy dissenting clergyman, to set up the first printing press

  • Day, Stockwell (Canadian politician)

    Stockwell Day, Canadian politician who served as leader of the Canadian Alliance party (2000–02), a forerunner of the Conservative Party of Canada. Day grew up in Montreal and in Ottawa, where he attended high school. He then lived in a number of other provinces and held various jobs, including

  • Day, The (work by Parini)

    Giuseppe Parini: …Horatian odes and particularly for Il giorno, (4 books, 1763–1801; The Day), a satiric poem on the selfishness and superficiality of the Milanese aristocracy.

  • Day, Thomas (English author)

    children's literature: From T.W. to Alice (1712?–1865): Some writers, such as Thomas Day, with his long-lived Sandford and Merton, were avowedly Rousseauist. Others took from him what appealed to them. Sarah Kirby Trimmer, whose Fabulous Histories specialized in piety, opposed the presumably free-thinking Rousseau on religious grounds but was in other respects strongly influenced by him.…

  • Day, William R. (United States jurist)

    William R. Day, statesman and justice of the U.S. Supreme Court (1903–22). After graduation from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, (1870), and admission to the bar, Day began to practice law in Canton, Ohio. He was made a judge of the Court of Common Pleas (1886) but was prevented by illness

  • Day, William Rufus (United States jurist)

    William R. Day, statesman and justice of the U.S. Supreme Court (1903–22). After graduation from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, (1870), and admission to the bar, Day began to practice law in Canton, Ohio. He was made a judge of the Court of Common Pleas (1886) but was prevented by illness

  • day-care centre (school)

    Day-care centre, institution that provides supervision and care of infants and young children during the daytime, particularly so that their parents can hold jobs. Such institutions appeared in France about 1840, and the Société des Crèches was recognized by the French government in 1869. Day-care

  • Day-Lewis, C. (British poet)

    C. Day-Lewis, one of the leading British poets of the 1930s; he then turned from poetry of left-wing political statement to an individual lyricism expressed in more traditional forms. The son of a clergyman, Day-Lewis was educated at the University of Oxford and taught school until 1935. His

  • Day-Lewis, Cecil (British poet)

    C. Day-Lewis, one of the leading British poets of the 1930s; he then turned from poetry of left-wing political statement to an individual lyricism expressed in more traditional forms. The son of a clergyman, Day-Lewis was educated at the University of Oxford and taught school until 1935. His

  • Day-Lewis, Daniel (British actor)

    Daniel Day-Lewis, British actor known for his on-screen intensity and for his exhaustive preparation for roles. Day-Lewis was the second child of Cecil Day-Lewis, one of the leading British poets of the 1930s, and actress Jill Balcon and was the grandson of motion-picture producer Sir Michael

  • Day-Lewis, Daniel Michael Blake (British actor)

    Daniel Day-Lewis, British actor known for his on-screen intensity and for his exhaustive preparation for roles. Day-Lewis was the second child of Cecil Day-Lewis, one of the leading British poets of the 1930s, and actress Jill Balcon and was the grandson of motion-picture producer Sir Michael

  • day-night sound level (acoustics)

    noise pollution: Measuring and perceiving loudness: ) A unit called day-night sound level (DNL or Ldn) accounts for the fact that people are more sensitive to noise during the night, so a 10-dBA penalty is added to SPL values that are measured between 10 pm and 7 am. DNL measurements are very useful for describing…

  • daya (musical instrument)

    tabla: …the tabla or as the daya (dahina or dayan, meaning “right”). It is a single-headed drum usually of wood and having the profile of two truncated cones bulging at the centre, the lower portion shorter. It is about 25 cm (10 inches) in height and 15 cm (6 inches) across.…

  • Daya Mata (American religious leader)

    Daya Mata, (Faye Wright), American religious leader (born Jan. 31, 1914, Salt Lake City, Utah—died Nov. 30, 2010, Los Angeles, Calif.), led for more than 50 years (1955–2010) the Self-Realization Fellowship/Yogoda Satsanga Society of India, one of the largest Hindu groups in the U.S. She was raised

  • Dayabhaga (Hindu law)

    suttee: …was indirectly due to the Dayabhaga system of law (c. 1100), which prevailed in Bengal and which gave inheritance to widows; such women were encouraged to committ suttee in order to make their inheritance available to other relatives. In the 16th century, steps to prohibit suttee were taken by the…

  • Dayak (people)

    Dayak, the non-Muslim indigenous peoples of the island of Borneo, most of whom traditionally lived along the banks of the larger rivers. Their languages all belong to the Indonesian branch of the Austronesian (Malayo-Polynesian) language family. Dayak is a generic term that has no precise ethnic or

  • dayal (bird)

    Dyal, popular species of magpie-robin

  • Dayal Das (Indian religious leader)

    Nirankari: …Nirankari movement was founded by Dayal Das (died 1855), who belonged to a half-Sikh, half-Hindu community in Peshawar. He believed that God is formless, or nirankar (hence the name Nirankari). He also stressed the importance of meditation.

  • dayan (musical instrument)

    tabla: …the tabla or as the daya (dahina or dayan, meaning “right”). It is a single-headed drum usually of wood and having the profile of two truncated cones bulging at the centre, the lower portion shorter. It is about 25 cm (10 inches) in height and 15 cm (6 inches) across.…

  • Dayan Khan (Mongol khan)

    Chahar: …part of the empire of Dayan Khan (1470–1543), the last great khan of a united Mongolia. After his death the khanate remained formally among the Chahar, although it was substantially weakened. The last noteworthy Chahar khan, Ligdan (1604–34), attempted strenuously to reassert his authority, but he was defeated by the…

  • Dayan Ta (shrine, Xi’an, China)

    Chinese architecture: The Sui (581–618) and Tang (618–907) dynasties: …(190-foot-) high Dayan Ta, or Great Wild Goose Pagoda, of the Ci’en Temple in Chang’an, on which the successive stories are marked by corbeled cornices, and timber features are simulated in stone by flat columns, or pilasters, struts, and capitals.

  • Dayan, Assi (Israeli actor, director, and screenwriter)

    Assi Dayan, (Asaf, or Assaf, Dayan), Israeli actor, director, and screenwriter (born Nov. 23, 1945, Nahalal, British Palestine [now in Israel]—died May 1, 2014, Tel Aviv, Israel), was one of Israel’s most respected actors and filmmakers for more than 40 years. Dayan achieved success with his first

  • Dayan, Moshe (Israeli statesman)

    Moshe Dayan, soldier and statesman who led Israel to dramatic victories over its Arab neighbours and became a symbol of security to his countrymen. Dayan was born on Israel’s first kibbutz and was raised on the country’s first successful cooperative farm settlement (moshav), Nahalal. He began his

  • Dayananda Anglo-Vedic School (Hindu organization)

    Lala Lajpat Rai: …helped to establish the nationalistic Dayananda Anglo-Vedic School and became a follower of Dayananda Sarasvati, the founder of the conservative Hindu society Arya Samaj (“Society of Aryans”). After joining the Congress Party and taking part in political agitation in the Punjab, Lajpat Rai was deported to Mandalay, Burma (now Myanmar),…

  • Dayananda Sarasvati (Hindu leader)

    Dayananda Sarasvati, Hindu ascetic and social reformer who was the founder (1875) of the Arya Samaj (Society of Aryans [Nobles]), a Hindu reform movement advocating a return to the temporal and spiritual authority of the Vedas, the earliest scriptures of India. Dayananda received the early

  • Dayanhe (poetry by Ai Qing)

    Ai Qing: His first collection of verse, Dayanhe (1936), reflects his concern for the common people of China; the title poem recalls the foster nurse (called Dayanhe in the poem) who reared him. He went to Yan’an in 1941 and eventually accepted the literary teachings of the Chinese Communist Party leader Mao…

  • Dayaram Gidumal (author)

    Sindhi literature: … (1844–1916), Mirza Qalich Beg (1853–1929), Dayaram Gidumal (1857–1927), and Parmanand Mewaram (1856?–1938). They produced original works and adapted books from Sanskrit, Hindi, Persian, and English. Kauromal Khilnani published Arya nari charitra (1905; “The Indo-Aryan Women”) and wrote extensively on the panchayat system, health,

  • daybed (furniture)

    settee: …hall or gallery; and the daybed, a carved or upholstered piece that originated in the 16th century, with a long seat and one inclined end.

  • Daybreak—2250 A.D. (work by Norton)

    Andre Norton: …hand at science fiction, producing Star Man’s Son, 2250 A.D. (1952); it was reprinted in paperback as Daybreak—2250 A.D. and sold more than a million copies.

  • Daybreakers (film by Michael and Peter Spierig [2009])

    Willem Dafoe: …hunter in the horror movie Daybreakers (2009).

  • daydream (psychology)

    mysticism: Reverie: Not all mysticism has its basis in trance states, however. Rudolf Otto noted this fact when he proposed a dualistic classification of numinous experiences. In the mysterium tremendum (“awe inspiring mystery”), the numinous is experienced as mysterious, awesome, and urgent. Otto identified the other…

  • Daydream Nation (album by Sonic Youth)

    Sonic Youth: …led to the double album Daydream Nation (1988), which is generally regarded as the band’s masterpiece.

  • Daydreamer, The (novel by McEwan)

    Ian McEwan: …clear their essential moral antipathy; The Daydreamer (1994) explores the imaginary world of a creative 10-year-old boy. The novel Amsterdam (1998), a social satire influenced by the early works of Evelyn Waugh, won the Booker Prize in 1998. Atonement (2001; film 2007) traces over six decades the consequences of a…

  • Daye (China)

    Daye, city, southeastern Hubei sheng (province), east-central China. Daye, established as a city in 1994, is situated on the south bank of the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang) near Huangshi and about 55 miles (90 km) southeast of Wuhan, the provincial capital. The site is low-lying and has many swamps

  • Daye, Stephen (American printer)

    Stephen Day, founder of the first printing press in England’s North American colonies. Day himself does not seem to have been a printer. He was a locksmith in Cambridge, Eng., and, in 1638, contracted with the Reverend Jose Glover, a wealthy dissenting clergyman, to set up the first printing press

  • Dayereh (film by Panahi [2000])

    Jafar Panahi: …political turn with Dayereh (2000; The Circle), about women in contemporary Iran. Two of the central characters are convicts escaping from prison, which allowed Panahi to point out the irony that they had exchanged their small jail for what some would consider the larger jail that is being a woman…

  • dayflower (plant)

    Dayflower, any member of the genus Commelina (family Commelinaceae), which includes about 100 species of weak-stemmed herbs of wide distribution, only a few of which are of horticultural interest. Commelina coelestis, C. diffusa, and C. erecta are often grown as ground covers because of their

  • dayfly (insect)

    Mayfly, (order Ephemeroptera), any member of a group of insects known for their extremely short life spans and emergence in large numbers in the summer months. Other common names for the winged stages are shadfly, sandfly, dayfly, fishfly, and drake. The aquatic immature stage, called a nymph or

  • dayglow (atmospheric science)

    airglow: Dayglow and twilight glow are analogous terms.

  • Daylight Saving Time

    Daylight Saving Time, system for uniformly advancing clocks, so as to extend daylight hours during conventional waking time in the summer months. In countries in the Northern Hemisphere, clocks are usually set ahead one hour in late March or in April and are set back one hour in late September or

  • daylily (plant)

    Daylily, any plant of the genus Hemerocallis of the family Hemerocallidaceae, consisting of about 15 species of perennial herbs distributed from central Europe to eastern Asia. Members of the genus have long-stalked clusters of funnel- or bell-shaped flowers that range in colour from yellow to red

  • daymark (colour)

    lighthouse: Identification: The daymark requirement of a lighthouse is also important; lighthouse structures are painted to stand out against the prevailing background. Shore lighthouses are usually painted white for this purpose, but in the open sea or against a light background conspicuous bands of contrasting colours, usually red…

  • Dayr al-Ba?rī (archaeological site, Egypt)

    Dayr al-Ba?rī, Egyptian archaeological site in the necropolis of Thebes. It is made up of a bay in the cliffs on the west bank of the Nile River east of the Valley of the Kings. Its name (Arabic for “northern monastery”) refers to a monastery built there in the 7th century ce. Of the three ancient

  • Dayr al-Jamājim, Battle of (Islamic history)

    Ibn al-Ash?ath: …superior army of 200,000 at Dayr al-Jamājim, outside Kūfah. Negotiations were initiated by the caliph’s agents, who offered the rebels the dismissal of al-?ajjāj, equal pay with their Syrian counterparts, and a governorship for Ibn al-Ash?ath. The Iraqis, however, rejected the proposals and were defeated in battle in September 701.…

  • Dayr al-Madīnah (ancient settlement, Egypt)

    Dayr al-Madīnah, ancient site on the west bank of the Nile River at Thebes in Upper Egypt. It is known primarily as the location of a settlement for craftsmen who laboured on the royal tombs, especially those in the nearby Valley of the Kings. The village, the best-preserved of its type, has

  • Dayr al-Zawr (Syria)

    Dayr al-Zawr, town, eastern Syria. The town is situated on the right bank of the Euphrates River; its name, meaning “monastery of the grove” (zawr, “tamarisk”), is probably derived from the ancient city of Auzara, or Azuara, situated nearby. The Ottomans built the present town in 1867 to curb the

  • Dayr Ballū? (river, West Bank)

    Yarqon River: They include the Wadi Shillo (Dayr Ballū?) in the east, usually considered by geographers to mark the boundary between historic Judaea and Samaria, and the Wadi Ayyalon (Aijalon) in the southeast. In the valley of the latter, according to the Bible, the moon stood still during Joshua’s conquest…

  • Dayr Mārī Antonios (monastery, Egypt)

    St. Anthony of Egypt: …Red Sea, where the monastery Dayr Mārī Antonios still stands. There he remained, receiving visitors and, on occasion, crossing the desert to Pispir. He ventured twice to Alexandria, the last time (c. 350) to preach against Arianism, a heretical doctrine teaching that Christ the Son is not of the same…

  • Dayr Yāsīn (Palestine)

    Palestine: Civil war in Palestine: …of the Arab village of Dayr Yāsīn. On April 22 Haifa fell to the Zionists, and Jaffa, after severe mortar shelling, surrendered to them on May 13. Simultaneously with their military offensives, the Zionists launched a campaign of psychological warfare. The Arabs of Palestine, divided, badly led, and reliant on…

  • Dayr, Ad- (monument, Petra, Jordan)

    Petra: Al-Dayr (“the Monastery”) is one of Petra’s best-known rock-cut monuments; it is an unfinished tomb facade that during Byzantine times was used as a church. Many of the tombs of Petra have elaborate facades and are now used as dwellings. The High Place of Sacrifice,…

  • Dayr, Al- (monument, Petra, Jordan)

    Petra: Al-Dayr (“the Monastery”) is one of Petra’s best-known rock-cut monuments; it is an unfinished tomb facade that during Byzantine times was used as a church. Many of the tombs of Petra have elaborate facades and are now used as dwellings. The High Place of Sacrifice,…

  • Days and Nights (film by Camargo [2014])

    Mark Rylance: Film and TV credits: …The Other Boleyn Girl (2008), Days and Nights (2014; an adaptation of Anton Chekhov’s The Seagull), The Gunman (2015), and Steven Spielberg’s Bridge of Spies (2015), in which he portrayed Soviet spy Rudolf Abel. Rylance’s work in the latter film earned him an Academy Award. His profile was quite literally

  • Days Aweigh (album by Wilson)

    Cassandra Wilson: …Point of View (1986) and Days Aweigh (1987), were heavily experimental, featuring psychedelic lyrics, electric instruments, and funk and reggae rhythms. Her third album, Blue Skies (1988), was more traditional; a collection of mostly jazz standards, it became her first popular success.

  • Days of Awe (short stories by Homes)

    A.M. Homes: Another short-story collection, Days of Awe, was published in 2018.

  • Days of Being Wild (film by Wong Kar-Wai [1990])

    Wong Kar-Wai: A Fei jingjyuhn (1990; Days of Being Wild) was the first film in which Wong employed voice-overs by multiple characters and a complex, fragmented story structure—both signatures of his style. It was also his first film with two of his key collaborators, cinematographer Christopher Doyle and actor Tony Leung.…

  • Days of Darkness (film by Arcand [2007])

    Denys Arcand: …comedy L’?ge des ténèbres (2007; Days of Darkness), in which he also acted; Le Règne de la beauté (2014; An Eye for Beauty), about a married architect who has an affair; and La Chute de l’empire américain (2018; The Fall of the American Empire), a satiric crime thriller that explores…

  • Days of Future Passed (album by the Moody Blues)

    the Moody Blues: …the group released their landmark Days of Future Passed (released in Britain in late 1967 and in the United States in early 1968). One of the first successful concept albums, it marked a turning point in the development of classical rock (an assemblage of musicians calling itself the London Festival…

  • Days of Glory (film by Tourneur [1944])

    Jacques Tourneur: Films of the 1940s at RKO: Cat People, I Walked with a Zombie, and Out of the Past: …rewarded with RKO’s ballyhooed production Days of Glory (1944), in which Gregory Peck made his screen debut as a heroic Russian peasant fighting the Nazi occupiers. It was timely and earnest, though seldom exciting. Experiment Perilous (1944) was a gothic thriller set in 1903 New York featuring Hedy Lamarr; it…

  • Days of Heaven (film by Malick [1978])

    Terrence Malick: His next film, Days of Heaven (1978), about day labourers in early 20th-century Texas, featured a similarly lush visual style and won even more critical acclaim, earning Malick the best director award at the Cannes film festival.

  • Days of Hope (work by Malraux)

    André Malraux: Life: His novel L’Espoir (Man’s Hope), based on his experiences in Spain, was published in 1937. A motion-picture version of L’Espoir that Malraux produced and directed in Barcelona in 1938 was not shown in France until after the country’s liberation at the end of World War II.

  • Days of Our Lives (American television soap opera)

    Days of Our Lives, American television soap opera that has been broadcast nearly every weekday since its 1965 debut on the National Broadcasting Company (NBC) network. The influential series won numerous Daytime Emmy Awards and became a fixture of American daytime programming. Days of Our Lives

  • Days of Remembrance (American holidays)

    Holocaust remembrance days: …camp in 1945, to be Days of Remembrance of Victims of the Holocaust. Danforth deliberately sought a date with American significance and a Saturday and Sunday so that observances could be held in synagogues and churches as well as in civic settings. In 1979 the U.S. President’s Commission on the…

  • Days of Thunder (film by Scott [1990])

    Nicole Kidman: Early life and career: …offer of a role in Days of Thunder (1990) drew her to the United States, and while working on that film she began a relationship with costar Tom Cruise; the two were married in 1990 (divorced 2001). Over the next decade Kidman appeared in a dozen films. Her roles included…

  • Days of Wine and Roses (song by Mancini and Mercer)
  • Days of Wine and Roses (film by Edwards [1962])

    Days of Wine and Roses, American film drama, released in 1962, about the ravaging effect of alcoholism on a young, codependent couple played by Jack Lemmon and Lee Remick. Joe Clay (Lemmon) is a successful advertising executive with a beautiful wife (Remick). As their social status improves and the

  • Days, The (work by ?āhā ?usayn)

    ?āhā ?usayn: , 1929–67; The Days), the first modern Arab literary work to be acclaimed in the West.

  • dayside auroral oval (meteorology)

    geomagnetic field: Outer magnetic field: …72° magnetic latitude creates the dayside auroral ovals. Auroras can be seen in these regions in the dark hours of winter, but they are much weaker than on the nightside because the particles that produce them have much less energy. The projections of the two lobes of the magnetic tail…

  • Dayti, Repiblik

    Haiti, country in the Caribbean Sea that includes the western third of the island of Hispaniola and such smaller islands as Gonave, Tortue (Tortuga), Grande Caye, and Vache. The capital is Port-au-Prince. Haiti, whose population is almost entirely descended from African slaves, won independence

  • daytime serial (broadcasting)

    Soap opera, broadcast dramatic serial program, so called in the United States because most of its major sponsors for many years were manufacturers of soap and detergents. The soap opera is characterized by a permanent cast of actors, a continuing story, emphasis on dialogue instead of action, a

  • Dayton (Tennessee, United States)

    Dayton, city, seat (1899) of Rhea county, southeastern Tennessee, U.S. It lies on Richland Creek near the Tennessee River, 36 miles (58 km) northeast of Chattanooga. Originally called Smith’s Crossroads (c. 1820), it was renamed Dayton in the 1870s. The Rhea County Courthouse in Dayton was the

  • Dayton (Ohio, United States)

    Dayton, city, seat (1803) of Montgomery county, southwestern Ohio, U.S., located 54 miles (87 km) northeast of Cincinnati, on a low floodplain of the Great Miami River, at the confluence of the Stillwater and Mad rivers and of Wolf Creek. It is the heart of a metropolitan area that includes the

  • Dayton Accords (international agreement)

    Dayton Accords, peace agreement reached on Nov. 21, 1995, by the presidents of Bosnia, Croatia, and Serbia, ending the war in Bosnia and outlining a General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina. It preserved Bosnia as a single state made up of two parts, the Bosniak-Croat

  • Dayton Company (American corporation)

    Target Corporation, American mass-market retail company operating large-scale food and general-merchandise discount stores. It is one of the largest discount retailers in the United States, and its red bull’s-eye logo is familiar throughout the country. Corporate headquarters are in Minneapolis,

  • Dayton, George Draper (American banker and real estate investor)

    Target Corporation: Banker and real estate investor George Draper Dayton incorporated Target in 1902 as Goodfellow Dry Goods. The following year the name was changed to Dayton Dry Goods Company and shortened to Dayton Company in 1911. On May 1, 1962, Dayton Company opened its first Target store, designed as a discount…

  • Dayton, Jonathan (American politician)

    Jonathan Dayton, youngest member of the U.S. Constitutional Convention, speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, and developer of large tracts in what later became the state of Ohio. The city of Dayton, Ohio, is named for him. Immediately following graduation from the College of New Jersey

  • Dayton, Mark (American politician)

    Amy Klobuchar: Mark Dayton would not seek reelection, she entered the race for his seat, running on the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL) ticket. She defeated her Republican opponent by a substantial margin and took office in 2007.

  • Dayton, University of (university, Dayton, Ohio, United States)

    University of Dayton, private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Dayton, Ohio, U.S. The university is affiliated with the Marianist order (Society of Mary) of the Roman Catholic church. It is composed of the College of Arts and Sciences and schools of business administration,

  • Dayton, William L. (United States senator)

    United States presidential election of 1856: Campaign and results: senator from California, with William L. Dayton, a former U.S. senator from New Jersey as his running mate. Former president Millard Fillmore served as the Know-Nothing nominee, with Andrew J. Donelson of Tennessee as his running mate; the Whigs united behind Fillmore rather than proposing their own candidate.

  • Dayton-Hudson Corporation (American corporation)

    Target Corporation, American mass-market retail company operating large-scale food and general-merchandise discount stores. It is one of the largest discount retailers in the United States, and its red bull’s-eye logo is familiar throughout the country. Corporate headquarters are in Minneapolis,

  • Daytona 200-mile race (motorcycle race)

    motorcycle racing: Since 1937 the Daytona 200-mile (320-kilometre) race has been the leading U.S. race. It is held on the same road circuit used for the 24-hour Daytona auto race. Grand Prix racing (in the sense of being a major event in the country in which it is held) for…

  • Daytona 500 (stock-car race)

    Daytona 500, annual U.S. stock-car race that is the most prestigious event in the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) season. The race has been held every February since 1959 at the Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Florida, and it consists of 200 laps around a

  • Daytona Beach (Florida, United States)

    Daytona Beach, city, Volusia county, northeastern Florida, U.S., on the Atlantic Ocean and Halifax River (a tidewater lagoon, part of the Intracoastal Waterway), about 90 miles (145 km) south of Jacksonville. The area was originally inhabited by Timucua Indians. Creek peoples lived there when

  • Daytona International Speedway (track, Daytona Beach, Florida, United States)

    Daytona Beach: …is also known for the Daytona International Speedway, site of the Daytona 500 in February and the Pepsi 400 in July, and it is the headquarters of the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR).

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