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  • Davidson, Mount (mountain, California, United States)

    San Francisco: City site: …Francisco’s hills are Twin Peaks, Mount Davidson, and Mount Sutro, all of which exceed 900 feet (270 metres) in elevation. The best known are Nob Hill, where the wealthy “nobs” (nabobs) built extravagant mansions in the 1870s, and Telegraph Hill, which once looked down on the Barbary Coast, a neighbourhood…

  • Davidson, Nicolas (British author)

    Nicolas Freeling, (Nicolas Davidson), British novelist and detective-story writer (born March 3, 1927, London, Eng.—died July 20, 2003, Grandfontaine, France), penned 36 works of fiction and several of nonfiction. While living in Amsterdam, he developed his first and best-known protagonist, Piet V

  • Davidson, Norman Ralph (American biochemist)

    Norman Ralph Davidson, American biochemist (born April 5, 1916, Chicago, Ill.—died Feb. 14, 2002, Pasadena, Calif.), conducted groundbreaking research in molecular biology that contributed to a fuller understanding of the genetic blueprint of human life. After studying at the University of Oxford a

  • Davidson, Randall Thomas (archbishop of Canterbury)

    Randall Thomas Davidson, Baron Davidson, Anglican archbishop of Canterbury who was prominent as a speaker in parliamentary debates on moral and national questions during his 25-year tenure. Ordained in 1875, Davidson became resident chaplain two years later to the archbishop of Canterbury,

  • Davidson, Randall Thomas Davidson, Baron (archbishop of Canterbury)

    Randall Thomas Davidson, Baron Davidson, Anglican archbishop of Canterbury who was prominent as a speaker in parliamentary debates on moral and national questions during his 25-year tenure. Ordained in 1875, Davidson became resident chaplain two years later to the archbishop of Canterbury,

  • Davidson, Robyn (Australian author)

    Australian literature: Literature from 1970 to 2000: …the most interesting examples was Robyn Davidson’s Tracks (1982), an account of her trek across Australia with her camels. It is a shaped narrative, tracing her increasing awareness of the meaning and experience of the desert and leading toward self-discovery. Like the imaginative writers, she looked for a pattern of…

  • Davidson, Thomas (Scottish paleontologist)

    Thomas Davidson, Scottish naturalist and paleontologist who became known as an authority on lamp shells, a phylum of bottom-dwelling marine invertebrates (Brachiopoda) whose fossils are among the oldest found. Davidson studied at the University of Edinburgh (1835–36) and on the Continent, where he

  • Davie, Alan (Scottish painter and lithographer)

    Alan Davie, (James Alan Davie), Scottish painter and lithographer (born Sept. 28, 1920, Grangemouth, Scot.—died April 5, 2014, near Hertford Heath, Hertfordshire, Eng.), was strongly influenced by the American Abstract Expressionists, notably Jackson Pollock, but he forged his own direction,

  • Davie, Donald Alfred (British author)

    Donald Alfred Davie, British poet, literary critic, and teacher who was a major conservative influence on British poetry in the 1950s. Davie served in the Royal Navy during World War II and obtained bachelor’s (1947) and doctoral (1951) degrees from the University of Cambridge. He taught at Trinity

  • Davie, James Alan (Scottish painter and lithographer)

    Alan Davie, (James Alan Davie), Scottish painter and lithographer (born Sept. 28, 1920, Grangemouth, Scot.—died April 5, 2014, near Hertford Heath, Hertfordshire, Eng.), was strongly influenced by the American Abstract Expressionists, notably Jackson Pollock, but he forged his own direction,

  • Davies of Hereford, John (English poet and writing master)

    John Davies, English poet and writing master whose chief work was Microcosmos (1603), a didactic religious treatise. Davies settled in Oxford and became known as the best penman of his day. As well as other religious verse treatises, he wrote Wittes Pilgrimage . . . (c. 1605), a collection of love

  • Davies of Llandinam, David Davies, 1st Baron (British politician)

    David Davies, 1st Baron Davies, British promoter of the League of Nations, advocate of an international policing force to prevent war. Davies was educated at King’s College, Cambridge, and was a Liberal member of the House of Commons (1906–29). He fought in World War I, after which he became

  • Davies’ J-curve hypothesis (sociology and political science)

    J-curve hypothesis, in sociology and political science, theory that attempts to identify the reasons behind the collective rebellion of individuals who are perceived as victims of injustice. The J-curve hypothesis was introduced in 1962 by American sociologist James C. Davies, who believed that

  • Davies, Arthur B. (American painter)

    Arthur B. Davies, American painter, printmaker, and tapestry designer known for his idylls of classical fantasy painted in a Romantic style but best remembered for his leadership in introducing modern European painting styles into early 20th-century America. Trained in Utica, New York City, and

  • Davies, Arthur Bowen (American painter)

    Arthur B. Davies, American painter, printmaker, and tapestry designer known for his idylls of classical fantasy painted in a Romantic style but best remembered for his leadership in introducing modern European painting styles into early 20th-century America. Trained in Utica, New York City, and

  • Davies, Cyril (British musician)

    British blues: …England) and the harmonica player Cyril Davies (b. 1932, Denham, Buckinghamshire, England—d. January 7, 1964, England), who played together in Blues Incorporated and passed on the influence of such heroes of Chicago’s urban electric blues as Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf to a generation of younger musicians. Some of these,…

  • Davies, Dave (British musician)

    the Kinks: June 21, 1944, London, England), Dave Davies (b. February 3, 1947, London), Peter Quaife (b. December 31, 1943, Tavistock, Devonshire—d. June 23, 2010, Herlev, Denmark), and Mick Avory (b. February 15, 1944, London).

  • Davies, David Davies, 1st Baron (British politician)

    David Davies, 1st Baron Davies, British promoter of the League of Nations, advocate of an international policing force to prevent war. Davies was educated at King’s College, Cambridge, and was a Liberal member of the House of Commons (1906–29). He fought in World War I, after which he became

  • Davies, David Ivor (British composer and playwright)

    Ivor Novello, Welsh actor-manager, composer, and playwright, best known for his lush, sentimental, romantic musicals. Novello, the son of the celebrated Welsh singing teacher, Dame Clara Novello Davies, was educated at Magdalen College, Oxford, and served with the Royal Naval Air Service during

  • Davies, Derek Gwyn (British journalist)

    Derek Gwyn Davies, British journalist (born March 9, 1931, London, Eng.—died Sept. 15, 2002, Antibes, France), revitalized the Far Eastern Economic Review, turning it from a single-sheet paper with a tiny readership into a prestigious magazine with a weekly circulation of 75,000. He joined the R

  • Davies, Donald Watts (British computer scientist)

    Donald Watts Davies, British computer scientist and inventor of packet switching, along with American electrical engineer Paul Baran. Davies studied at Imperial College in London, obtaining degrees in physics (B.Sc.,1943) and mathematics (B.Sc.,1947). In 1947 he went to work on the design of the

  • Davies, Emily (British educator)

    Emily Davies, English pioneer in the movement to secure university education for women and chief founder of Girton College, Cambridge. She was responsible for University College, London, admitting women to classes in 1870 for the first time. Educated at home, Davies joined the campaign for the

  • Davies, Hunter (British author)

    Larry Kramer: Film and stage work: …he helped to adapt from Hunter Davies’ novel of teenage sexual experimentation. Kramer then produced and wrote the screenplay for Women in Love (1969), an adaptation of the D.H. Lawrence novel directed by Ken Russell. He received an Academy Award nomination for best adapted screenplay. His final screenwriting effort—a musical…

  • Davies, John (English poet and writing master)

    John Davies, English poet and writing master whose chief work was Microcosmos (1603), a didactic religious treatise. Davies settled in Oxford and became known as the best penman of his day. As well as other religious verse treatises, he wrote Wittes Pilgrimage . . . (c. 1605), a collection of love

  • Davies, John (Welsh grammarian)

    Si?n Dafydd Rhys, Welsh physician and grammarian whose grammar, Cambrobrytannicae Cymraecaeve linguae institutiones et rudimenta (1592), was the first to expound the Welsh language through the international medium of Latin. Rhys spent some time at Oxford then earned a degree in medicine from the

  • Davies, John Howard (British actor and director)

    John Howard Davies, British actor, producer, and director (born March 9, 1939, London, Eng.—died Aug. 22, 2011, Blewbury, Oxfordshire, Eng.), was a child star in post-World War II Britain, playing the title roles in director David Lean’s Oliver Twist (1948), The Rocking Horse Winner (1949), and Tom

  • Davies, John Paton, Jr. (American diplomat)

    John Paton Davies, Jr., American diplomat who suffered an undeserved dismissal from the foreign service in 1954 following accusations by Sen. Joseph McCarthy that Davies had “lost China” to the communists in 1949. Davies, a decorated World War II hero, was one of several “China hands” targeted

  • Davies, Marion (American actress)

    Marion Davies, American actor who was more renowned for her 34-year relationship with publishing giant William Randolph Hearst than for her performance career. Nonetheless, she was a popular movie star in the 1920s, and she was particularly admired for her comic talents. Marion’s father, Bernard J.

  • Davies, Paul (British physicist and astrobiologist)

    Paul Davies, British theoretical physicist and astrobiologist who contributed to scholarly and popular debate on issues such as the origin of life and extraterrestrial intelligence through his books and television specials. Davies graduated from University College, London, in 1967 with a bachelor’s

  • Davies, Paul Charles William (British physicist and astrobiologist)

    Paul Davies, British theoretical physicist and astrobiologist who contributed to scholarly and popular debate on issues such as the origin of life and extraterrestrial intelligence through his books and television specials. Davies graduated from University College, London, in 1967 with a bachelor’s

  • Davies, Ray (British musician)

    the Kinks: The principal members were Ray Davies (b. June 21, 1944, London, England), Dave Davies (b. February 3, 1947, London), Peter Quaife (b. December 31, 1943, Tavistock, Devonshire—d. June 23, 2010, Herlev, Denmark), and Mick Avory (b. February 15, 1944, London).

  • Davies, Richard (Welsh bishop)

    Celtic literature: The Reformation: …by Salesbury in collaboration with Richard Davies, bishop of St. David’s. The Welsh Bible translated by William Morgan, bishop of St. Asaph, aided by Edmwnd Prys, was published in 1588. The revised version, published in 1620, is still used. It would be difficult to exaggerate the importance of these three…

  • Davies, Robertson (Canadian author)

    Robertson Davies, novelist and playwright whose works offer penetrating observations on Canadian provincialism and prudery. Educated in England at the University of Oxford, Davies had training in acting, directing, and stage management as a member of the Old Vic Repertory Company. He edited the

  • Davies, Samuel (American minister)

    Samuel Davies, Presbyterian preacher in colonial British America who defended religious dissent and helped lead the Southern phase of the religious revival known as the Great Awakening. Davies was educated at Samuel Blair’s “log college” at Fagg’s Manor, Pa., and was ordained in 1747. His work

  • Davies, Sarah Emily (British educator)

    Emily Davies, English pioneer in the movement to secure university education for women and chief founder of Girton College, Cambridge. She was responsible for University College, London, admitting women to classes in 1870 for the first time. Educated at home, Davies joined the campaign for the

  • Davies, Sir John (British poet)

    Sir John Davies, English poet and lawyer whose Orchestra, or a Poem of Dancing reveals a typically Elizabethan pleasure in the contemplation of the correspondence between the natural order and human activity. Educated at the University of Oxford, Davies entered the Middle Temple, London, in 1588

  • Davies, Sir Peter Maxwell (British musician)

    Sir Peter Maxwell Davies, English composer, conductor, and teacher whose powerfully innovative music made him one of the most influential British composers of the 20th century. Davies studied at the Royal Manchester College of Music (1952–56; now the Royal Northern College of Music), at the

  • Davies, Valentine (American writer, producer, and director)
  • Davies, William Henry (British poet)

    William Henry Davies, English poet whose lyrics have a force and simplicity uncharacteristic of the poetry of most of his Georgian contemporaries. After serving as apprentice to a picture framer, Davies tramped through the United States, crossed the Atlantic many times on cattle boats, lost a foot

  • Davies, William Robertson (Canadian author)

    Robertson Davies, novelist and playwright whose works offer penetrating observations on Canadian provincialism and prudery. Educated in England at the University of Oxford, Davies had training in acting, directing, and stage management as a member of the Old Vic Repertory Company. He edited the

  • Davila, Arrigo Caterino (Italian historian)

    Arrigo Caterino Davila, Italian historian who was the author of a widely read history of the Wars of Religion in France. About 1583 Davila became a page in the service of Catherine de Médicis, wife of King Henry II of France. He subsequently became a soldier and fought in the French civil wars

  • Dávila, Gil González (Spanish conquistador)

    Central America: Appointment of Pedrarias: Pedrarias sent a kinsman, Gil González Dávila, to explore northward, and he found civilization on the shores of Lake Nicaragua. The jealous Pedrarias forced him to flee to Santo Domingo before a Spanish colony could be planted, however, and instead sent Francisco Hernández de Córdoba in 1524, who established…

  • Dávila, Miguel (president of Honduras)

    Honduras: The 20th century: …strongman José Santos Zelaya put Miguel Dávila into the Honduran presidency. This led in 1911 and 1912 to something more serious than periodic revolutions. The U.S. president, William Howard Taft, sent marines to protect American banana investments, which by this time had grown considerably, with three companies exploiting this Honduran…

  • Daviot, Gordon (Scottish author)

    Josephine Tey, Scottish playwright and author of popular detective novels praised for their warm and readable style. A physical education teacher for eight years, Tey became a full-time writer with the successful publication of her first book, The Man in the Queue (1929). She wrote some novels and

  • Davis (California, United States)

    Davis, city, Yolo county, central California, U.S. It lies in the Sacramento River valley, 11 miles (18 km) west of Sacramento. The city, founded in 1868, was named Davisville for Jerome C. Davis, who owned a stock farm on the site. (The city’s name was shortened in 1907 by the post office and

  • Davis Cup (sports trophy)

    Davis Cup, trophy awarded to the winner of an annual international lawn-tennis tournament originally for amateur men’s teams. The official name is the International Lawn Tennis Challenge Trophy. The trophy was donated in 1900 by American Dwight F. Davis for a competition between teams from the

  • Davis Islands (islands, Tampa, Florida, United States)

    Tampa: In the 1920s the man-made Davis Islands were created offshore in Hillsborough Bay (Tampa Bay’s eastern arm) for real estate development. The origin of the city’s name is uncertain; it may be derived from a Creek word for “near it” or “a nearby place,” for its proximity to the bay,…

  • Davis Mountains (mountains, Texas, United States)

    Davis Mountains, segment of the southern Rocky Mountains, mainly in Jeff Davis county, western Texas, U.S., extending northward for 45 miles (72 km) above the town of Marfa. Locally called the Texas Alps, the range has many peaks that exceed 7,000 feet (2,100 metres), the highest of which is Mount

  • Davis Strait (strait, Canada and Greenland)

    Davis Strait, bay of the northern Atlantic Ocean, lying between southeastern Baffin Island (Canada) and southwestern Greenland. The strait separates the depths of Baffin Bay (north) from those of the Labrador Sea (south) and forms part of the Northwest Passage, a route through the Canadian Arctic

  • Davis v. Bandemer (law case)

    gerrymandering: In Davis v. Bandemer (1986), however, a plurality of the Supreme Court held that political gerrymanders could be found unconstitutional (under the equal protection clause) if the resulting electoral system “is arranged in a manner that will consistently degrade a voter’s or a group of voters’…

  • Davis v. Board of School Commissioners of Mobile County (law case)

    Davis v. Board of School Commissioners of Mobile County, case in which the U.S. Supreme Court on April 20, 1971, ruled (9–0) that the desegregation plan for Mobile county, Alabama, did not make use of all possible remedies and that lower courts needed to develop a more realistic plan. Davis was one

  • Davis v. County School Board of Prince Edward County (law case)

    Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka: Elliott (1951), and Davis v. County School Board of Prince Edward County (1952), U.S. district courts in Kansas, South Carolina, and Virginia, respectively, ruled on the basis of Plessy that the plaintiffs had not been deprived of equal protection because the schools they attended were comparable to the…

  • Davis v. Monroe County Board of Education (law case)

    Davis v. Monroe County Board of Education, case in which the U.S. Supreme Court on May 24, 1999, ruled (5–4) that, under Title IX of the Federal Education Amendments (1972), school boards are liable for failing to stop student-on-student sexual harassment under certain circumstances. The case

  • Davis, Al (American football coach and executive)

    Al Davis, American gridiron football coach and executive who, as commissioner of the American Football League (AFL), was a key actor in the merger of the AFL with the National Football League (NFL) and was either a part owner or principal owner of the Oakland Raiders football franchise (1966–2011).

  • Davis, Alexander Jackson (American architect)

    Alexander Jackson Davis, American architect, designer, draftsman, and illustrator who was best known for his innovative, picturesque country houses. He helped establish the familiar type of American rural house in the “carpenter Gothic” style of the mid-19th century. Davis became a skilled

  • Davis, Alice Coachman (American athlete)

    Alice Coachman, American athlete who was the first black woman to win an Olympic gold medal. Coachman first attracted attention in 1939 by breaking Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) high school and college women’s high-jump records while barefoot. She won the AAU outdoor high-jump championship for the

  • Davis, Allen (American football coach and executive)

    Al Davis, American gridiron football coach and executive who, as commissioner of the American Football League (AFL), was a key actor in the merger of the AFL with the National Football League (NFL) and was either a part owner or principal owner of the Oakland Raiders football franchise (1966–2011).

  • Davis, Angela (American activist)

    Angela Davis, militant American black activist who gained an international reputation during her imprisonment and trial on conspiracy charges in 1970–72. The daughter of Alabama schoolteachers, Davis studied at home and abroad (1961–67) before becoming a doctoral candidate at the University of

  • Davis, Angela Yvonne (American activist)

    Angela Davis, militant American black activist who gained an international reputation during her imprisonment and trial on conspiracy charges in 1970–72. The daughter of Alabama schoolteachers, Davis studied at home and abroad (1961–67) before becoming a doctoral candidate at the University of

  • Davis, Angela Yvonne (American activist)

    Angela Davis, militant American black activist who gained an international reputation during her imprisonment and trial on conspiracy charges in 1970–72. The daughter of Alabama schoolteachers, Davis studied at home and abroad (1961–67) before becoming a doctoral candidate at the University of

  • Davis, Ann B. (American actress)

    Ann B. Davis, (Ann Bradford Davis), American actress (born May 3, 1926, Schenectady, N.Y.—died June 1, 2014, San Antonio, Texas), was best remembered by TV viewers for two roles: as the devoted wise-cracking housekeeper Alice, who good-naturedly dispensed advice to a blended family of eight on the

  • Davis, Ann Bradford (American actress)

    Ann B. Davis, (Ann Bradford Davis), American actress (born May 3, 1926, Schenectady, N.Y.—died June 1, 2014, San Antonio, Texas), was best remembered by TV viewers for two roles: as the devoted wise-cracking housekeeper Alice, who good-naturedly dispensed advice to a blended family of eight on the

  • Davis, Anthony (American basketball player)

    New Orleans Pelicans: …draft lottery and selected forward-centre Anthony Davis with the first overall selection of the draft. Davis took the league by storm and led the team to a return to the playoffs in the 2014–15 season. After a first-round elimination in that postseason, the Pelicans struggled through an injury-riddled 2015–16, posting…

  • Davis, Anthony (American musician)

    New Orleans Pelicans: …draft lottery and selected forward-centre Anthony Davis with the first overall selection of the draft. Davis took the league by storm and led the team to a return to the playoffs in the 2014–15 season. After a first-round elimination in that postseason, the Pelicans struggled through an injury-riddled 2015–16, posting…

  • Davis, Arthur Hoey (Australian writer)

    Steele Rudd, novelist, playwright, and short-story writer whose comic characters are a well-known part of Australia’s literary heritage. Son of a blacksmith, Rudd worked as a horsebreaker, stockman, and drover before going to Brisbane, where he became a clerk and began to write poems and sketches

  • Davis, B. Lynch (Argentine author)

    Jorge Luis Borges, Argentine poet, essayist, and short-story writer whose works became classics of 20th-century world literature. Borges was reared in the then-shabby Palermo district of Buenos Aires, the setting of some of his works. His family, which had been notable in Argentine history,

  • Davis, B. Lynch (Argentine author)

    Adolfo Bioy Casares, Argentine writer and editor, known both for his own work and for his collaborations with Jorge Luis Borges. His elegantly constructed works are oriented toward metaphysical possibilities and employ the fantastic to achieve their meanings. Born into a wealthy family, Bioy

  • Davis, B. Lynch (Argentine author)

    Adolfo Bioy Casares, Argentine writer and editor, known both for his own work and for his collaborations with Jorge Luis Borges. His elegantly constructed works are oriented toward metaphysical possibilities and employ the fantastic to achieve their meanings. Born into a wealthy family, Bioy

  • Davis, Benjamin O., Jr. (United States general)

    Benjamin O. Davis, Jr., pilot, officer, and administrator who became the first African American general in the U.S. Air Force. His father, Benjamin O. Davis, Sr., was the first African American to become a general in any branch of the U.S. military. Davis studied at the University of Chicago before

  • Davis, Benjamin O., Sr. (United States general)

    Benjamin O. Davis, Sr., soldier who became the first black general in the U.S. Army. After serving as a volunteer in the Spanish-American War (1898), Benjamin Davis, Sr., enlisted as a private in the 9th Cavalry of the U.S. Army. He rose to sergeant major within two years and earned a commission as

  • Davis, Benjamin Oliver, Jr. (United States general)

    Benjamin O. Davis, Jr., pilot, officer, and administrator who became the first African American general in the U.S. Air Force. His father, Benjamin O. Davis, Sr., was the first African American to become a general in any branch of the U.S. military. Davis studied at the University of Chicago before

  • Davis, Benjamin Oliver, Sr. (United States general)

    Benjamin O. Davis, Sr., soldier who became the first black general in the U.S. Army. After serving as a volunteer in the Spanish-American War (1898), Benjamin Davis, Sr., enlisted as a private in the 9th Cavalry of the U.S. Army. He rose to sergeant major within two years and earned a commission as

  • Davis, Bette (American actress)

    Bette Davis, versatile, volatile American actress, whose raw, unbridled intensity kept her at the top of her profession for 50 years. Davis developed a taste for acting while attending her mother’s alma mater, Cushing Academy in Massachusetts. After gaining a smattering of experience in summer

  • Davis, Billy (American music producer)

    Billy Davis, American songwriter and advertising executive (born July 11, 1932, Detroit, Mich.—died Sept. 2, 2004, New Rochelle, N.Y.), collaborated with Gwen Gordy and her brother Berry Gordy, Jr., in the 1950s on Jackie Wilson’s hits “Reet Petite” and “Lonely Teardrops.” In 1958 he cofounded A

  • Davis, Brad (American actor)

    Larry Kramer: The Normal Heart and later works: …star of the original production, Brad Davis, committed suicide because of AIDS complications in 1991. The 2014 HBO adaptation won an Emmy Award for best television movie. Kramer later wrote a sequel, The Destiny of Me (1992), which depicted Weeks’s own battle with the disease. (Kramer was himself diagnosed with…

  • Davis, Carl (American music producer)

    “It's All Right”: Chicago Soul: … producers—including Roquel (“Billy”) Davis and Carl Davis (who were not related), Johnny Pate (who also was an arranger), and Curtis Mayfield—developed a recognizable Chicago sound that flourished from the late 1950s to the mid-1970s. This lightly gospelized rhythm and blues, which came to be known as Chicago soul, replaced the…

  • Davis, Carol Rymer (American radiologist and ballonist)

    Ben L. Abruzzo: Richard Abruzzo and ballooning partner Carol Rymer Davis, a prominent Denver radiologist, won the 2004 Gordon Bennett race, but both were killed in September 2010, during that year’s Bennett race, when their balloon crashed into the Adriatic Sea.

  • Davis, Charles Harold (American painter)

    Charles Harold Davis, American painter, whose romantic interpretations of the landscape excelled in their cloud effects. Davis was a pupil of the schools of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts and was sent to Paris in 1880. Having studied at the Academy Julian, he went to Barbizon and often painted in

  • Davis, Charles Henry (American naval officer and scientist)

    Charles Henry Davis, U.S. naval officer and scientist. Davis spent two years at Harvard before becoming a midshipman, and he returned there for the study of mathematics between sea cruises. He made the first comprehensive survey of the coasts of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Maine, including the

  • Davis, Cleland (American officer and inventor)

    artillery: Recoilless guns: …first to succeed was Commander Cleland Davis of the U.S. Navy, who in 1912 developed a gun with a single chamber and two opposite barrels. One barrel carried the projectile, the other an equal weight of grease and lead shot. The explosion of the central cartridge ejected both loads, and,…

  • Davis, Clive (American record company executive)

    Clive Davis, American music executive and producer who headed several labels, notably CBS Records (1967–73) and Arista (1974–2000), and guided the careers of numerous musicians. Davis earned scholarships to New York University (B.A., 1953) and Harvard Law School (1956), and in 1960 he joined the

  • Davis, Clive Jay (American record company executive)

    Clive Davis, American music executive and producer who headed several labels, notably CBS Records (1967–73) and Arista (1974–2000), and guided the careers of numerous musicians. Davis earned scholarships to New York University (B.A., 1953) and Harvard Law School (1956), and in 1960 he joined the

  • Davis, David (United States jurist and politician)

    David Davis, American politician, a close associate of Abraham Lincoln. He was a Supreme Court justice and senator during the antebellum, American Civil War, and postwar eras. After graduating from Kenyon College in 1832, Davis earned a law degree from Yale in 1835. He was admitted to the Illinois

  • Davis, David (British politician)

    David Davis, On July 13, 2016, just hours after she became the U.K.’s prime minister, Theresa May appointed David Davis secretary of state for exiting the European Union. This new post, at the head of a new government department, resulted from a referendum three weeks earlier in which 52% of the

  • Davis, David Brion (American historian)

    animal rights: Animals and the law: …about slavery,” the American historian David Brion Davis has written, is the

  • Davis, Donald (Canadian actor)

    Donald Davis, Canadian actor who was adept in both classical and modern roles and was admired as one of the most outstanding interpreters of Samuel Beckett’s works; his signature role was the title character in Beckett’s Krapp’s Last Tape, for which he won an Obie award in 1960 (b. 1928?, Toronto,

  • Davis, Dwight F. (American politician and athlete)

    Dwight F. Davis, tennis player best known as the donor of the Davis Cup (properly the International Lawn Tennis Challenge Trophy) for competition among teams representing various nations. He later became a United States cabinet member. For three consecutive years (1899–1901) Davis won the U.S.

  • Davis, Dwight Filley (American politician and athlete)

    Dwight F. Davis, tennis player best known as the donor of the Davis Cup (properly the International Lawn Tennis Challenge Trophy) for competition among teams representing various nations. He later became a United States cabinet member. For three consecutive years (1899–1901) Davis won the U.S.

  • Davis, Egerton Yorrick (Canadian physician)

    Sir William Osler, Baronet, Canadian physician and professor of medicine who practiced and taught in Canada, the United States, and Great Britain and whose book The Principles and Practice of Medicine (1892) was a leading textbook. Osler played a key role in transforming the organization and

  • Davis, Elmer (American journalist)

    Elmer Davis, news broadcaster and writer, director of the U.S. Office of War Information during World War II. Davis had been a reporter and editorial writer for The New York Times when he joined the Columbia Broadcasting System in 1939 as a radio newscaster. He soon gained a national following.

  • Davis, Elmer Holmes (American journalist)

    Elmer Davis, news broadcaster and writer, director of the U.S. Office of War Information during World War II. Davis had been a reporter and editorial writer for The New York Times when he joined the Columbia Broadcasting System in 1939 as a radio newscaster. He soon gained a national following.

  • Davis, Ernest R. (American football player)

    Ernie Davis, American collegiate gridiron football player who was the first African American to win the Heisman Trophy. As a student at Elmira (N.Y.) Free Academy, Davis was a high-school All-American in football and basketball. Widely recruited to play running back in collegiate football, he chose

  • Davis, Ernie (American football player)

    Ernie Davis, American collegiate gridiron football player who was the first African American to win the Heisman Trophy. As a student at Elmira (N.Y.) Free Academy, Davis was a high-school All-American in football and basketball. Widely recruited to play running back in collegiate football, he chose

  • Davis, Fred (British snooker and billiards player)

    Fred Davis, British snooker and billiards player who was world professional snooker champion eight times (1948-49, 1951-56) and world billiards champion twice (1980-81); Davis carried on the tradition of his renowned older brother, Joe, who held the snooker title for 20 years (1927-46), and

  • Davis, Gary (American musician)

    gospel music: Black gospel music: …“We Shall Overcome”; blind Reverend Gary Davis (1896–1972), a wandering preacher and guitar soloist; Thomas A. Dorsey (1899–1993), a prolific and best-selling songwriter whose works include, most notably, “Precious Lord, Take My Hand”; and the Reverend C.L. Franklin (1915–84) of Detroit (father of soul music singer Aretha Franklin), who issued…

  • Davis, Geena (American actress)

    Geena Davis, American actress who was skilled at comedic roles and brought charm and likability to eccentric characters. Davis studied drama at New England College and later at Boston University’s College of Fine Arts, from which she graduated in 1979; she also worked in summer stock theatre. She

  • Davis, George E. (British chemist)

    chemical engineering: History: …textbook on the subject, by George E. Davis, a British chemical consultant. This concentrated on the design of plant items for specific operations. The notion of a processing plant encompassing a number of operations, such as mixing, evaporation, and filtration, and of these operations being essentially similar, whatever the product,…

  • Davis, George W. (American art director)
  • Davis, Glenn (American track and field athlete)

    Glenn Davis, American world-record holder in the 400-metre hurdles (1956–62) who was the first man to win the Olympic gold medal twice in that event. Davis excelled in track for Barberton (Ohio) High School, often scoring more individually than entire opposing teams. At Ohio State University

  • Davis, Glenn Ashby (American track and field athlete)

    Glenn Davis, American world-record holder in the 400-metre hurdles (1956–62) who was the first man to win the Olympic gold medal twice in that event. Davis excelled in track for Barberton (Ohio) High School, often scoring more individually than entire opposing teams. At Ohio State University

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