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  • Durham Cathedral (cathedral, Durham, England, United Kingdom)

    Western architecture: Burgundy: The cathedral abbey church of Durham (1093–1133) was a very early demonstration of the dramatic potentialities of this type of construction. Lombard experiments may have been as early as 1080, but the dating is uncertain; in any event, the development of this structural unit into the…

  • Durham Report (work by Durham)

    John George Lambton, 1st earl of Durham: …and nominal author of the Report on the Affairs of British North America (1839), which for many years served as a guide to British imperial policy. The “Durham Report” was largely written by his chief secretary in Canada, Charles Buller (1806–48).

  • Durham Station (North Carolina, United States)

    Durham, city, seat (1881) of Durham county, north-central North Carolina, U.S. It is situated about 10 miles (16 km) northeast of Chapel Hill and 25 miles (40 km) northwest of Raleigh, the three cities forming one of the state’s major urban areas—the Research Triangle. The first settlement (about

  • Durham, Baron (British statesman)

    John George Lambton, 1st earl of Durham, British reformist Whig statesman sometimes known as “Radical Jack,” governor-general and lord high commissioner of Canada, and nominal author of the Report on the Affairs of British North America (1839), which for many years served as a guide to British

  • Durham, John George Lambton, 1st earl of (British statesman)

    John George Lambton, 1st earl of Durham, British reformist Whig statesman sometimes known as “Radical Jack,” governor-general and lord high commissioner of Canada, and nominal author of the Report on the Affairs of British North America (1839), which for many years served as a guide to British

  • Durham, University of (university, Durham, England, United Kingdom)

    Durham: …with the creation of the University of Durham in 1832 and the appropriation of the castle to the university’s use in 1836. Originally compactly situated on the peninsula, the university has expanded across the river to a site south of it as well. The Oriental Museum (opened in 1960 as…

  • Durhamville (North Carolina, United States)

    Durham, city, seat (1881) of Durham county, north-central North Carolina, U.S. It is situated about 10 miles (16 km) northeast of Chapel Hill and 25 miles (40 km) northwest of Raleigh, the three cities forming one of the state’s major urban areas—the Research Triangle. The first settlement (about

  • durian (tree and fruit)

    Durian, (Durio zibethinus), tree of the hibiscus, or mallow, family (Malvaceae) and its large edible fruit. The durian is cultivated in Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, and southern Thailand and is seldom exported. Although the durian has a mild sweet flavour, it also has a pungent odour,

  • duricrust (geology)

    Duricrust, surface or near-surface of the Earth consisting of a hardened accumulation of silica (SiO2), alumina (Al2O3), and iron oxide (Fe2O3), in varying proportions. Admixtures of other substances commonly are present and duricrusts may be enriched with oxides of manganese or titanium within

  • Durie, John (Scottish theologian)

    John Dury, Scottish Protestant clergyman who was a leading advocate of union of the Lutheran and Reformed churches. Dury was educated at Sedan, Leyden, and Oxford. By 1630 he had already begun working for unity between the churches, traveling among the courts and churches of the German states. His

  • Durio zibethinus (tree and fruit)

    Durian, (Durio zibethinus), tree of the hibiscus, or mallow, family (Malvaceae) and its large edible fruit. The durian is cultivated in Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, and southern Thailand and is seldom exported. Although the durian has a mild sweet flavour, it also has a pungent odour,

  • Duris (Greek artist)

    Douris, Greek vase painter of the early Classical period, known for his fine draftsmanship and crisp, clear lines. He worked in both the red- and black-figure styles, and he decorated his vases with many themes. He frequently selected themes popular during the Archaic period, for example, the

  • Durisol (FAO soil group)

    Durisol, one of the 30 soil groups in the classification system of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). Durisols are soils in semiarid environments that have a substantial layer of silica within 1 metre (39 inches) of the land surface. The silica occurs either as weakly cemented nodules or

  • Durius River (river, Europe)

    Douro River, third longest river of the Iberian Peninsula, draining a catchment area of 30,539 square miles (79,096 square km). Rising in the Sierra de Urbión in Spain, the river crosses the Numantian Plateau in a pronounced bend and flows generally westward for 556 miles (895 km) across Spain and

  • Durkan, John Mark (Northern Ireland politician)

    Mark Durkan, politician who represented the constituency of Foyle in the Northern Ireland Assembly (1998–2010) and the British Parliament (2005–17) and who served as leader of the nationalist Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) from 2001 to 2010. Durkan entered politics while still a student

  • Durkan, Mark (Northern Ireland politician)

    Mark Durkan, politician who represented the constituency of Foyle in the Northern Ireland Assembly (1998–2010) and the British Parliament (2005–17) and who served as leader of the nationalist Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) from 2001 to 2010. Durkan entered politics while still a student

  • Durkheim, émile (French social scientist)

    émile Durkheim, French social scientist who developed a vigorous methodology combining empirical research with sociological theory. He is widely regarded as the founder of the French school of sociology. Durkheim was born into a Jewish family of very modest means, and it was taken for granted that

  • Durlas (Ireland)

    Thurles, town, County Tipperary, Ireland, on the banks of the River Suir. The seat of the Roman Catholic archbishopric of Cashel and Emly, the town is a marketing centre for a large agricultural area; it has a sugar beet factory, and it is a well-known sporting centre. The Knights Templar held a

  • Durmitor (massif, Montenegro)

    Durmitor, mountain massif in Montenegro, part of the Dinaric ranges and a national park region that includes 15 peaks of more than 6,600 feet (2,000 metres) in height, including the highest point in the country—Bobotov Peak, reaching 8,274 feet (2,522 metres). Between the peaks are deep valleys and

  • Durning, Charles (American actor and boxer)

    Charles Durning, American character actor (born Feb. 28, 1923, Highland Falls, N.Y.—died Dec. 24, 2012, New York, N.Y.), portrayed onstage, in film, and on television a wide array of characters, ranging from naive and gentle to combative and even sadistic. From 1962 he appeared regularly in the New

  • Dürnkrut, Battle of (European history)

    Czechoslovak history: The P?emyslid rulers of Bohemia (895–1306): 26, 1278, at Dürnkrut, Austria, he lost both the battle and his life. (In the same period Hungary underwent its own disintegration, and strong feudal warlords ruled over its different parts. Most of Slovakia was then controlled by the mighty Matú? ?ak, lord of Tren?ín.)

  • Durnovaria (England, United Kingdom)

    Dorchester, town (parish), West Dorset district, administrative and historic county of Dorset, southwestern England, on the River Frome. Dorchester is the county town (seat) of Dorset. The ancient town (then known as Durnovaria) was a sizable Roman British centre, and many remains of the period

  • Durnovo, Pyotr Nikolayevich (Russian statesman)

    Pyotr Nikolayevich Durnovo, Russian statesman and security chief under tsars Alexander III and Nicholas II, who brutally suppressed the revolution of 1905. He is also noted for a remarkable memorandum he wrote in 1914 in which he accurately foresaw the course of the coming World War, including the

  • Dürnstein (Austria)

    Nieder?sterreich: The small town of Dürnstein, known as the “pearl of the Wachau,” possesses perfectly preserved medieval and Baroque buildings and the ruins of a fortified castle that once held Richard I of England as a prisoner (1192–93).

  • Duroc (breed of pig)

    Duroc, breed of pig developed between 1822 and 1877 from the Old Duroc pig of New York and the Red Jersey pig of New Jersey; it was formerly called the Duroc-Jersey. The Duroc proved particularly suitable for feeding in the United States Corn Belt; by the 1930s it was the predominant breed in the

  • Duroc, Géraud-Christophe-Michel, duc de Frioul (French general)

    Géraud-Christophe-Michel Duroc, duke de Frioul, French general and diplomat, one of Napoleon’s closest advisers. The son of Claude de Michel, chevalier du Roc, who was a cavalry officer, Duroc went to the Chalons artillery school, emigrated in 1792, but changed his mind, returned to France, entered

  • Duroc-Jersey (breed of pig)

    Duroc, breed of pig developed between 1822 and 1877 from the Old Duroc pig of New York and the Red Jersey pig of New Jersey; it was formerly called the Duroc-Jersey. The Duroc proved particularly suitable for feeding in the United States Corn Belt; by the 1930s it was the predominant breed in the

  • Durocatalaunum (France)

    Chalons-en-Champagne, town, capital of Marne département, Grand Est région, northeastern France. It lies along the right bank of the Marne River, in the heart of the rolling Champagne country. Small branches of the Marne River flow through the town. Chief town of a Gallic tribe, the Catalauni, it

  • Durocatalaunum, battle of (ancient Roman history)

    Valentinian I: At Durocatalaunum (modern Chalons-sur-Marne, France), in the third engagement, Jovinus inflicted heavy casualties on the Alemanni, securing Gaul for years to come. Meanwhile, in 367, the emperor moved to Ambiani (modern Amiens, France) to be in closer communication with his general Theodosius (father of the later…

  • Durocher, Leo (American baseball player and manager)

    Leo Durocher, American professional baseball player and manager. Durocher played minor-league baseball for three years before joining the New York Yankees in 1928. He was a superb fielder at shortstop but a mediocre hitter, and he was sold to the Cincinnati Reds in 1930. He was traded to the St.

  • Durocher, Leo Ernest (American baseball player and manager)

    Leo Durocher, American professional baseball player and manager. Durocher played minor-league baseball for three years before joining the New York Yankees in 1928. He was a superb fielder at shortstop but a mediocre hitter, and he was sold to the Cincinnati Reds in 1930. He was traded to the St.

  • Durosier, Guy (Haitian musician)

    Guy Durosier, Haitian singer, organist, saxophonist, and composer whose 50-year career saw his popularity extend to several generations and encompass a number of styles, including big band and ’50s Cuban music (b. March 1, 1932, Port-au-Prince, Haiti—d. Aug. 19, 1999, Bothell,

  • Durovernum Cantiacorum (England, United Kingdom)

    Canterbury, historic town and surrounding city (local authority) in the administrative and historic county of Kent, southeastern England. Its cathedral has been the primary ecclesiastical centre of England since the early 7th century ce. The city, a district within the administrative county of

  • durra (grain)

    Sorghum, (Sorghum bicolor), cereal grain plant of the grass family (Poaceae) and its edible starchy seeds. The plant likely originated in Africa, where it is a major food crop, and has numerous varieties, including grain sorghums, used for food; grass sorghums, grown for hay and fodder; and

  • Durrānī (people, Afghanistan)

    Durrānī, one of the two chief tribal confederations of Afghanistan, the other being the Ghilzay. In the time of Nāder Shāh the Durrānī were granted lands in the region of Qandahār, which was their homeland; and they moved there from Herāt. In the late 18th century the Durrānī took up agriculture. U

  • Durrānī dynasty

    Afghanistan: The Durrānī dynasty: The commander of Nādir Shah’s 4,000-man Afghan bodyguard was A?mad Khan Abdālī, who returned to Kandahār and was elected shah by a tribal council. He adopted the title Durr-i Durrān (“Pearl of Pearls”). Supported by most tribal leaders, A?mad Shah Durrānī extended Afghan…

  • Durrānī, A?mad Shah (ruler of Afghanistan)

    A?mad Shah Durrānī, founder of the state of Afghanistan and ruler of an empire that extended from the Amu Darya (ancient Oxus River) to the Indian Ocean and from Khorāsān into Kashmir, the Punjab, and Sindh. Head of the central government, with full control of all departments of state in domestic

  • Durrell, Gerald Malcolm (British naturalist)

    Gerald Malcolm Durrell, British naturalist (born Jan. 7, 1925, Jamshedpur, India—died Jan. 30, 1995, St. Helier, Jersey), gained international stature among conservationists for his pioneering yet sometimes controversial role in preserving and breeding endangered species by housing them in zoos w

  • Durrell, Lawrence (British author)

    Lawrence Durrell, English novelist, poet, and writer of topographical books, verse plays, and farcical short stories who is best known as the author of The Alexandria Quartet, a series of four interconnected novels. Durrell spent most of his life outside England and had little sympathy with the

  • Durrell, Lawrence George (British author)

    Lawrence Durrell, English novelist, poet, and writer of topographical books, verse plays, and farcical short stories who is best known as the author of The Alexandria Quartet, a series of four interconnected novels. Durrell spent most of his life outside England and had little sympathy with the

  • Dürrenmatt, Friedrich (Swiss author)

    Friedrich Dürrenmatt, Swiss playwright, novelist, and essayist whose satiric, almost farcical tragicomic plays were central to the post-World War II revival of German theatre. Dürrenmatt, who was educated in Zürich and Bern, became a full-time writer in 1947. His technique was clearly influenced by

  • Durrer, Robert (Swiss inventor)

    basic oxygen process: …was initiated in Switzerland by Robert Durrer in the late 1940s. After experimenting with a 2.5-ton pilot unit, Durrer worked with engineers at the Voest company at Linz, Austria, who set up a commercially operating 35-ton converter in 1952. A second unit began operation within a year at Donawitz, also…

  • Durr?s (Albania)

    Durr?s, primary seaport of Albania. It lies on the Adriatic Sea coast, west of Tirana. Founded as Epidamnus by Greeks from Corcyra and Corinth in the 7th century bce, it was seized by the Illyrian king Glaucias in 312 bce. It later passed to the Romans, who called it Dyrrhachium and made it the

  • Durrington Walls (Neolithic henge, England, United Kingdom)

    Durrington Walls, the largest known Neolithic henge in the United Kingdom. Overlooking the River Avon near Amesbury, Wiltshire, the henge is approximately 1.9 miles (3 km) northeast of Stonehenge (3000 to 1520 bce) and about 76 yards (about 70 metres) north of Woodhenge (2500 to 2200 bce).

  • Durrow, Book of (illuminated manuscript)

    Anglo-Saxon art: …Gospels (early 8th century), the Book of Durrow (7th century), and the Book of Kells (c. 800). The Hiberno-Saxon style (q.v.), eventually imported to the European continent, exercised great influence on the art of the Carolingian empire.

  • Durst, Robert (American real-estate heir)

    Robert Durst, American real-estate heir who was a suspect in the 1982 disappearance of his first wife and who was charged with the 2000 murder of a friend; in addition, he was acquitted for killing a neighbour in 2003. Durst gained national attention as the subject of the HBO documentary series The

  • Durst, Robert Alan (American real-estate heir)

    Robert Durst, American real-estate heir who was a suspect in the 1982 disappearance of his first wife and who was charged with the 2000 murder of a friend; in addition, he was acquitted for killing a neighbour in 2003. Durst gained national attention as the subject of the HBO documentary series The

  • durukuli (primate genus)

    Durukuli, (genus Aotus), any of several species of closely related nocturnal monkeys of Central and South America distinguished by their large yellow-brown eyes. The durukuli is round-headed, with small ears and dense, soft, grizzled gray or brown fur. Weight ranges from 780 to 1,250 grams (1.7 to

  • durum (cereal)

    Durum wheat, (species Triticum durum), hard wheat (q.v.) producing a glutenous flour. The purified middlings of durum wheat are known as semolina, used for pasta

  • durum wheat (cereal)

    Durum wheat, (species Triticum durum), hard wheat (q.v.) producing a glutenous flour. The purified middlings of durum wheat are known as semolina, used for pasta

  • Duruy, Victor (French educator and statesman)

    Victor Duruy, French scholar and public official who, as national minister of education (1863–69), initiated extensive and controversial reforms. Duruy taught at the Collège Henri IV from 1833 to 1861. He wrote textbooks and works on ancient Roman and Greek civilization, among them Histoire des

  • Durūz (religious sect)

    Druze, small Middle Eastern religious sect characterized by an eclectic system of doctrines and by a cohesion and loyalty among its members (at times politically significant) that have enabled them to maintain for centuries their close-knit identity and distinctive faith. The Druze numbered more

  • Durūz, Jabal al- (mountain, Syria)

    Mount al-Durūz, mountain just east of Al-Suwaydā? in southern Syria. Mount al-Durūz rises to about 5,900 feet (1,800 metres). The name in Arabic means “Mountain of the Druzes.” The Druze, a sect derived from the Ismā?īliyyah branch of Shī?ite Islam, have been settled in the area of Mount al-Durūz

  • Durūz, Mount (mountain, Syria)

    Mount al-Durūz, mountain just east of Al-Suwaydā? in southern Syria. Mount al-Durūz rises to about 5,900 feet (1,800 metres). The name in Arabic means “Mountain of the Druzes.” The Druze, a sect derived from the Ismā?īliyyah branch of Shī?ite Islam, have been settled in the area of Mount al-Durūz

  • Durūz, Mount al- (mountain, Syria)

    Mount al-Durūz, mountain just east of Al-Suwaydā? in southern Syria. Mount al-Durūz rises to about 5,900 feet (1,800 metres). The name in Arabic means “Mountain of the Druzes.” The Druze, a sect derived from the Ismā?īliyyah branch of Shī?ite Islam, have been settled in the area of Mount al-Durūz

  • Dury, George H. (American geologist)

    geography: Physical geography and physical systems: …Strahler in New York, and George Dury, who was trained in the United Kingdom but spent much of his career in Australia and the United States. These major protagonists introduced systems thinking and the study of processes to British physical geography, which was then reexported to American geography from the…

  • Dury, Ian (British singer)

    Ian Dury, British singer, songwriter, and actor (born May 12, 1942, Upminster, Essex, Eng.—died March 27, 2000, Hampstead, North London, Eng.), was celebrated as a pioneer of British punk rock. A veteran of the early 1970s pub-rock scene with his first band, Kilburn and the High Roads, Dury f

  • Dury, John (Scottish theologian)

    John Dury, Scottish Protestant clergyman who was a leading advocate of union of the Lutheran and Reformed churches. Dury was educated at Sedan, Leyden, and Oxford. By 1630 he had already begun working for unity between the churches, traveling among the courts and churches of the German states. His

  • Duryea (automobile)

    automobile: The United States: The Duryea consisted of a one-cylinder gasoline engine, with electrical ignition, installed in a secondhand carriage. It first ran on September 21, 1893. Driving a later model, J. Frank Duryea won the first automobile race in America in which more than two cars competed, the Chicago…

  • Duryea, Charles E. (American inventor)

    Charles E. Duryea and J. Frank Duryea: Charles Duryea entered the rapidly growing bicycle business and displayed a marked inventive talent. In 1886 at the Ohio state fair, he saw a stationary gasoline engine that seemed to him to be sufficiently compact to power a carriage or a wagon. By 1891 he…

  • Duryea, Charles E.; and Duryea, J. Frank (American inventors)

    Charles E. Duryea and J. Frank Duryea, inventors of one of the first automobiles and the first that was actually built and operated in the United States. Charles Duryea entered the rapidly growing bicycle business and displayed a marked inventive talent. In 1886 at the Ohio state fair, he saw a

  • Duryea, Charles Edgar (American inventor)

    Charles E. Duryea and J. Frank Duryea: Charles Duryea entered the rapidly growing bicycle business and displayed a marked inventive talent. In 1886 at the Ohio state fair, he saw a stationary gasoline engine that seemed to him to be sufficiently compact to power a carriage or a wagon. By 1891 he…

  • Duryea, J. Frank (American inventor)

    Charles E. Duryea and J. Frank Duryea: …design, and, with his brother Frank, he then constructed a car and engine in a rented loft in Springfield, Massachusetts. In later years a controversy marred relations between the brothers: Charles claimed that the model was completed to an operable state under his guidance, while Frank asserted that he perfected…

  • Duryea, James Frank (American inventor)

    Charles E. Duryea and J. Frank Duryea: …design, and, with his brother Frank, he then constructed a car and engine in a rented loft in Springfield, Massachusetts. In later years a controversy marred relations between the brothers: Charles claimed that the model was completed to an operable state under his guidance, while Frank asserted that he perfected…

  • DuSable Museum of African American History (museum, Chicago, Illinois, United States)

    Chicago: Cultural institutions: The DuSable Museum of African American History (1961) is one of the country’s oldest museums devoted to the study of African American life and history. In addition, Robie House (1908–10), owned by the university, is one of the finest examples of Prairie-style architecture.

  • Du?an, Stefan (emperor of Serbia)

    Stefan Du?an, king of Serbia (1331–46) and “Emperor of the Serbs, Greeks, and Albanians” (1346–55), the greatest ruler of medieval Serbia, who promoted his nation’s influence and gave his people a new code of laws. Stefan Du?an was the son of Stefan Uro? III, who was the eldest son of the reigning

  • Du?anbe (national capital, Tajikistan)

    Dushanbe, city and capital of Tajikistan. It lies along the Varzob (Dushanbinka) River in the Gissar valley, in the southwest of the republic. It was built in the Soviet period on the site of three former settlements, of which the largest was named Dyushambe (Tajik dush, meaning “Monday,” its

  • Duse, Eleonora (Italian actress)

    Eleonora Duse, Italian actress who found her great interpretive roles in the heroines of the Italian playwright Gabriele D’Annunzio and of the Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen. Most of Duse’s family were actors who played in the same touring troupe, and she made her first stage appearance at the

  • Du?ek, Jan Ladislav (Bohemian pianist and composer)

    Jan Ladislav Dussek, Bohemian pianist and composer, best known for his piano and chamber music. The son of a cathedral organist, Dussek studied music with his father and showed great skill as a pianist and organist at an early age. He sang in the choir at Iglau (Jihlava) and later studied theology

  • Dushan, Stephen (emperor of Serbia)

    Stefan Du?an, king of Serbia (1331–46) and “Emperor of the Serbs, Greeks, and Albanians” (1346–55), the greatest ruler of medieval Serbia, who promoted his nation’s influence and gave his people a new code of laws. Stefan Du?an was the son of Stefan Uro? III, who was the eldest son of the reigning

  • Dushanbe (national capital, Tajikistan)

    Dushanbe, city and capital of Tajikistan. It lies along the Varzob (Dushanbinka) River in the Gissar valley, in the southwest of the republic. It was built in the Soviet period on the site of three former settlements, of which the largest was named Dyushambe (Tajik dush, meaning “Monday,” its

  • Dushman, Saul (American chemist)

    Saul Dushman, Russian-American physical chemist, author of several standard scientific textbooks. Dushman immigrated to America in 1891, later entering the University of Toronto and receiving his doctorate in 1912. That year he joined the General Electric Research Laboratory, where he rose to the

  • Dusicyon australis (extinct mammal)

    South American fox: …and the Falkland Island, or Antarctic, wolf (Dusicyon australis), which was hunted to extinction in the late 1800s.

  • Dusik, Jan Ladislav (Bohemian pianist and composer)

    Jan Ladislav Dussek, Bohemian pianist and composer, best known for his piano and chamber music. The son of a cathedral organist, Dussek studied music with his father and showed great skill as a pianist and organist at an early age. He sang in the choir at Iglau (Jihlava) and later studied theology

  • Dusk (work by Michelangelo)

    Michelangelo: The Medici Chapel: The immensely massive Day and Dusk are relatively tranquil in their mountainous grandeur, though Day perhaps implies inner fire. Both female figures have the tall, slim proportions and small feet considered beautiful at the time, but otherwise they form a contrast: Dawn, a virginal figure, strains upward along her curve…

  • dusk (atmospheric science)

    sunlight: …the sky at dawn and dusk.

  • Dusk of Dawn (work by Du Bois)

    W.E.B. Du Bois: Black nationalism and later works: In 1940 appeared Dusk of Dawn, subtitled An Essay Toward an Autobiography of a Race Concept. In this brilliant book, Du Bois explained his role in both the African and the African American struggles for freedom, viewing his career as an ideological case study illuminating the complexity of…

  • Dusklands (novel by Coetzee)

    J.M. Coetzee: Dusklands (1974), Coetzee’s first book, contains two novellas united in their exploration of colonization, The Vietnam Project (set in the United States in the late 20th century) and The Narrative of Jacobus Coetzee (set in 18th-century South Africa). In the Heart of the Country (1977;…

  • dusky bush baby (primate)

    bush baby: …Africa, although one species, the dusky bush baby (G. matschiei), is restricted to the rainforests of eastern Congo (Kinshasa). They feed on gum, insects, pods, flowers, and leaves. The larger Allen’s bush baby (G. alleni) and its relatives live in the rainforests of west-central Africa, where they feed on fallen…

  • dusky flathead (fish)

    scorpaeniform: Ecology: …fishes, but others, like the dusky flathead (Platycephalus fuscus), the largest and commercially most valuable of the Australian flatheads, have a varied diet of fishes, mollusks, crustaceans, and marine worms.

  • dusky flounder (fish)

    flounder: …cm (29 inches); and the dusky flounder (Syacium papillosum), a tropical western Atlantic species. Flounders in those families typically have eyes and colouring on the left side. See also flatfish.

  • dusky redshank (bird)

    redshank: The slightly larger spotted redshank (T. erythropus), also called dusky or black redshank, has reddish brown legs and a straight red bill with a brown tip. In breeding season, its plumage is black; in winter, gray. It breeds across sub-Arctic Eurasia and winters from the Mediterranean region into…

  • dusky shark (shark species)

    Galapagos shark: Natural history: …similar to that of the dusky shark (C. obscurus), a shark with which it is often confused, though the dorsal fins of the Galapagos shark are somewhat larger. The pectoral fins of the Galapagos shark are longer and more pointed, and it has a very wide and rounded snout.

  • dusky-footed woodrat (rodent)

    woodrat: …huge stick nest of the dusky-footed woodrat (N. fuscipes), which can be more than a metre (3.3 feet) high and is built on the ground, on rocky slopes, or in tree canopies. Other woodrats live in moderately large structures built at the bases of cacti, bushes, or trees, in caves,…

  • Duss und underm Rafe (work by Frey)

    Adolf Frey: With his poetry, notably Duss und underm Rafe (1891), rooted in the style of the folk song, he helped inaugurate creative and stylistic developments in Swiss poetry. His historical novels, such as Die Jungfer von Wattenwil (1912; “The Maiden of Wattenwil”), and his plays are considered to be of…

  • Dussehra (Hindu festival)

    Dussehra, in Hinduism, holiday marking the triumph of Rama, an avatar of Vishnu, over the 10-headed demon king Ravana, who abducted Rama’s wife, Sita. The festival’s name is derived from the Sanskrit words dasha (“ten”) and hara (“defeat”). Symbolizing the victory of good over evil, Dussehra is

  • Dussek, Jan Ladislav (Bohemian pianist and composer)

    Jan Ladislav Dussek, Bohemian pianist and composer, best known for his piano and chamber music. The son of a cathedral organist, Dussek studied music with his father and showed great skill as a pianist and organist at an early age. He sang in the choir at Iglau (Jihlava) and later studied theology

  • Düsseldorf (Germany)

    Düsseldorf, city, capital of North Rhine–Westphalia Land (state), western Germany. It lies mainly on the right bank of the Rhine River, 21 miles (34 km) northwest of Cologne. It is the administrative and cultural centre of the industrial Rhine-Ruhr area. First mentioned in 1159, Düsseldorf

  • Düsseldorf school (painting)

    Düsseldorf school, painters who studied at the Düsseldorf Academy (now Düsseldorf State Academy of Art) and whose work showed the influence of its insistence on hard linearism and elevated subject matter. The academy of painting in Düsseldorf was founded in 1767 and attracted students from

  • Düsseldorf Vampire (German serial killer)

    Peter Kürten, German serial killer whose widely analyzed career influenced European society’s understanding of serial murder, sexual violence, and sadism in the first half of the 20th century. Kürten, the third of 13 children, experienced a violent childhood. His father, an abusive alcoholic, was

  • dust

    occupational disease: Dusts: The inhalation of a variety of dusts is responsible for a number of lung and respiratory disorders, whose symptoms and severity depend on the composition and size of the dust particle, the amount of dust inhaled, and the length of exposure. The lung diseases…

  • Dust Bowl (historic region, United States)

    Dust Bowl, section of the Great Plains of the United States that extended over southeastern Colorado, southwestern Kansas, the panhandles of Texas and Oklahoma, and northeastern New Mexico. The term Dust Bowl was suggested by conditions that struck the region in the early 1930s. The area’s

  • dust box (printmaking)

    printmaking: Aquatint: …be done either with a dust box or with dust bags.

  • dust devil (meteorology)

    Dust devil, small, brief whirlwind occurring most frequently in the early afternoon when a land surface is heating rapidly. Dust devils are occasionally made visible by the lofting of dust, leaves, or other loose matter from the surface. See also

  • Dust Flux Monitor Instrument (device)

    Stardust/NExT: The Dust Flux Monitor Instrument was basically a sophisticated large-area microphone that measured particle impact rates and mass distribution. It was built as a shield to protect the spacecraft from fast-moving dust.

  • Dust in the Wind (film by Hou Hsiao-hsien [1986])

    Hou Hsiao-hsien: …such as Lianlian fengchen (1986; Dust in the Wind) and Beiqing chengshi (1989; A City of Sadness). The latter film detailed the February 28, 1947, massacre by mainland Chinese of local Taiwanese demonstrating in the city of Taipei. The subject remained taboo in China for decades after the massacre, and…

  • dust jet (comet)

    comet: General considerations: …glowing comae and their long dust tails and ion tails. Comets can appear at random from any direction and provide a fabulous and ever-changing display for many months as they move in highly eccentric orbits around the Sun.

  • Dūst Mo?ammad (ruler of Afghanistan)

    Dōst Mo?ammad Khān, ruler of Afghanistan (1826–63) and founder of the Bārakzay dynasty, who maintained Afghan independence during a time when the nation was a focus of political struggles between Great Britain and Russia. Dōst Mo?ammad was one of a number of sons of Pāyenda Khān, head of the

  • Dust My Broom (song by James)

    Elmore James: …of his 1952 hit “Dust My Broom” and repeated that song’s opening guitar chorus on many later recordings. Characteristically, his singing was harsh, including shouted phrases, and his vivid slide guitar replies featured heavy amplifier reverberation. His most-praised work began in 1958 and included the slow blues songs “The…

  • Dust of Snow (poem by Frost)

    Robert Frost: Works: …most economical form in “Dust of Snow”:

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