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  • Danhauser (German ballad)

    Tannh?user: …preserved in a popular ballad, Danhauser, traceable to 1515; the origins of the legend itself probably lie in the 13th century. Enticed to the court of Venus, Tannh?user lives a life of earthly pleasure, but soon, torn by remorse, he makes a pilgrimage to Rome to seek remission of his…

  • Danhofer, Joseph Philipp (German artist)

    pottery: Tin-glazed ware: …his work on porcelain) and Joseph Philipp Danhofer. Perhaps the finest 18th-century faience was made by the factory at H?chst, near Mainz, which also manufactured porcelain. Decoration was usually in overglaze colours, and landscapes, figure subjects, German flowers, and chinoiseries (European delineations of the Chinese scene with a strong element…

  • Danian Stage (stratigraphy)

    Danian Stage, lowermost and oldest division of Paleocene rocks, representing all rocks deposited worldwide during the Danian Age (66 million to 61.6 million years ago) of the Paleogene Period (66 million to 23 million years ago). The Danian Stage is named for exposures in Denmark, in which great

  • Danican, André (French musician and composer)

    André Philidor, musician and composer, an outstanding member of a large and important family of musicians long connected with the French court. The first recorded representatives of the family were Michel Danican (died c. 1659), upon whom the nickname Philidor (the name of a famous Italian

  • Danican, Fran?ois-André (French composer)

    Fran?ois-André Philidor, French composer whose operas were successful and widely known in his day and who was a famous and remarkable chess player. The last member of a large and prominent musical family, Philidor was thoroughly trained in music, but at age 18 he turned to chess competition

  • Danican, Michel (French musician)

    André Philidor: …representatives of the family were Michel Danican (died c. 1659), upon whom the nickname Philidor (the name of a famous Italian musician) was bestowed by Louis XIII as a complimentary reference to his skill, and André’s father Jean (died 1679), who, like Michel, played various instruments in the Grande écurie,…

  • Daniel (Russian prince)

    Russia: The northeast: Daniel, Nevsky’s son and the progenitor of all the later Rurikid princes of Moscow, had a long and successful reign (1276–1303), but at his death the principality still embraced little more than the territory of the present Moscow province (an area of 140 miles [225…

  • Daniel (film by Lumet [1983])

    Timothy Hutton: Hutton starred in Sydney Lumet’s Daniel (1983), based on E.L. Doctorow’s 1971 novel The Book of Daniel; played an anthropologist in the science fiction movie Iceman (1984); and costarred with Sean Penn in John Schlesinger’s The Falcon and the Snowman (1985). His turn as a graffiti artist in Turk 182!…

  • Daniel (Hebrew prophet)

    biblical literature: Daniel: …collection of popular stories about Daniel, a loyal Jew, and the record of visions granted to him, with the Babylonian Exile of the 6th century bce as their background. The book, however, was written in a later time of national crisis—when the Jews were suffering severe persecution under Antiochus IV…

  • Daniel (Old English poem)

    Caedmon manuscript: …contains the poems Genesis, Exodus, Daniel, and Christ and Satan, originally attributed to Caedmon (q.v.) because these subjects correspond roughly to the subjects described in Bede’s Ecclesiastical History as having been rendered by Caedmon into vernacular verse. The whole, called Caedmon’s Paraphrase, was first published in 1655. Later studies make…

  • Daniel (work by Buber)

    Martin Buber: From mysticism to dialogue.: …early mystical period culminated in Daniel (1913), five dialogues on orientation and realization, man’s two basic stances toward the world. Orientation takes the world as a static state of affairs governed by comprehensible laws. It is a receptive, analytical, or systematizing attitude. Realization, on the other hand, is a creative,…

  • Daniel al-Qumisi (Jewish Karaite leader)

    Judaism: Anti-rabbinic reactions: Under the leadership of Daniel al-Qumisi (c. 850?), a Karaite settlement prospered in the Holy Land, from which it spread as far as northwestern Africa and Christian Spain. A barrage of Karaite treatises presenting new views of scriptural exegesis stimulated renewed study of the Bible and the Hebrew language…

  • Daniel Aleksandrovich (Russian prince)

    Russia: The northeast: Daniel, Nevsky’s son and the progenitor of all the later Rurikid princes of Moscow, had a long and successful reign (1276–1303), but at his death the principality still embraced little more than the territory of the present Moscow province (an area of 140 miles [225…

  • Daniel Boone (American television series)

    Fess Parker: …returned to the frontier in Daniel Boone (1964–70), several episodes of which he produced and directed. Parker served in the U.S. Navy during World War II and graduated (1950) from the University of Texas at Austin before embarking on a career in Hollywood. His movie appearances included supporting roles in…

  • Daniel Boone Homestead (monument, Reading, Pennsylvania, United States)

    Reading: Local historic landmarks include the Daniel Boone Homestead (where Boone was born in 1734), the Conrad Weiser Homestead (1729), and Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site near Pottstown. An annual folk festival at nearby Kutztown reflects the Pennsylvania Dutch (German) heritage of the area.

  • Daniel Deronda (novel by Eliot)

    Daniel Deronda, novel by George Eliot, published in eight parts in 1876. It is notable for its exposure of Victorian anti-Semitism. The novel builds on the contrast between Mirah Cohen, a poor Jewish girl, and the upper-class Gwendolen Harleth, who marries for money and regrets it. The less

  • Daniel Hale Williams Westside Preparatory School (school, Chicago, Illinois, United States)

    Marva Collins: …system to found the private Daniel Hale Williams Westside Preparatory School. With financial assistance from the government-funded Alternative Schools Network, she began with four students; within a year enrollment had increased to 20 students, most of whom were considered uneducable by the standards of Chicago public schools.

  • Daniel in the Lions’ Den (work by Bernini)

    Gian Lorenzo Bernini: Later years: …Rome, he carved two groups, Daniel in the Lions’ Den and Habakkuk and the Angel (1655–61). These works show the beginnings of his late style: elongation of the body, expressive gesture, and simplified yet emphatic emotional expression. The same characteristics are already found in the figures supporting the Throne of…

  • Daniel Johnson Dam (dam, Canada)

    Manicouagan River: …Hydro-Quebec has built several plants—including Daniel-Johnson Dam, one of the world’s largest multiarch dams—which together have a generating capacity in the millions of kilowatts. A submarine cable, laid in 1954, carries electric power under the St. Lawrence to the copper-mining regions in the Gaspé Peninsula. Iron ore is mined in…

  • Daniel of Galicia (ruler of Galicia and Volhynia)

    Daniel Romanovich, ruler of the principalities of Galicia and Volhynia (now in Poland and Ukraine, respectively), who became one of the most powerful princes in east-central Europe. Son of Prince Roman Mstislavich, Daniel was only four years old when his father, who had united Galicia and Volhynia,

  • Daniel of Kiev (Russian author)

    Daniel Of Kiev, the earliest known Russian travel writer, whose account of his pilgrimage to the Holy Land is the earliest surviving record in Russian of such a trip. Abbot of a Russian monastery, he visited Palestine probably during 1106–07. His narrative begins at Constantinople; from there he

  • Daniel Romanovich (ruler of Galicia and Volhynia)

    Daniel Romanovich, ruler of the principalities of Galicia and Volhynia (now in Poland and Ukraine, respectively), who became one of the most powerful princes in east-central Europe. Son of Prince Roman Mstislavich, Daniel was only four years old when his father, who had united Galicia and Volhynia,

  • Daniel Sieff Research Institute (institution, Re?ovot, Israel)

    Chaim Weizmann: Conflict with Zionist extremists: …again to science, founding the Daniel Sieff Research Institute at Re?ovot, Palestine (1934), with the help of friends in England. Earlier, he had toured South Africa (1931) and played a leading part in public efforts to save German Jewry and its property after the advent of the Nazis (1933).

  • Daniel the Pilgrim (Russian author)

    Daniel Of Kiev, the earliest known Russian travel writer, whose account of his pilgrimage to the Holy Land is the earliest surviving record in Russian of such a trip. Abbot of a Russian monastery, he visited Palestine probably during 1106–07. His narrative begins at Constantinople; from there he

  • Daniel Zuloaga and His Daughters (painting by Zuloaga)

    Ignacio Zuloaga: …international success with the painting Daniel Zuloaga and His Daughters, which was exhibited in 1899 and purchased by the French government for the Luxembourg Museum in Paris. About 1907 he became a popular society portraitist, an aspect of his career that brought him considerable wealth.

  • Daniel, Arnaud (Proven?al poet and troubadour)

    Arnaut Daniel, Proven?al poet, troubadour, and master of the trobar clus, a poetic style composed of complex metrics, intricate rhymes, and words chosen more for their sound than for their meaning. Thought to have been born in Ribérac (now in France), Arnaut was a nobleman and a highly regarded

  • Daniel, Clifton, Jr. (American journalist)

    Clifton Daniel, Jr., American journalist and newspaper editor (born Sept. 19, 1912, Zebulon, N.C.—died Feb. 21, 2000, New York, N.Y.), served as managing editor of the New York Times from 1964 to 1969 and as its Washington, D.C., bureau chief from 1973 to 1976. Daniel began his long career at the T

  • Daniel, Frank (American filmmaker)

    Frank Daniel, Czechoslovak-born filmmaker who, faced with Soviet persecution, fled to the U.S. after producing the 1965 movie The Shop on Main Street, which won an Academy Award for best foreign film; in the U.S. he headed several film schools (b. April 14, 1926--d. Feb. 29,

  • Daniel, Gabriel (French historian)

    Gabriel Daniel, French Jesuit historian whose writings include an outstanding history of France. Daniel entered the Society of Jesus in 1667, later became librarian of the professed house at Paris, and was appointed historiographer of France by King Louis XIV. In this last capacity he wrote a

  • Daniel, Mary Margaret Truman (American writer)

    Margaret Truman, (Mary Margaret Truman Daniel), American writer (born Feb. 17, 1924, Independence, Mo.—died Jan. 29, 2008, Chicago, Ill.), was the illustrious only daughter of U.S. Pres. Harry S. Truman and first lady Bess Truman and carved a literary niche for herself as her parents’ biographer

  • Daniel, Peter Vivian (United States jurist)

    Peter Vivian Daniel, associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States (1841–60). Daniel, born into a prominent Virginia family that had settled in the area in the early 17th century, was the son of Travers Daniel, a plantation owner, and Frances Moncure Daniel. He attended the College of

  • Daniel, Prince (Swedish prince)

    Crown Princess Victoria: …Victoria announced her engagement to Daniel Westling, her personal trainer and an entrepreneur in the fitness industry. The wedding took place in the Storkyrkan, or Cathedral of St. Nicholas, in Stockholm on June 19, 2010. Their daughter, Princess Estelle, was born on February 23, 2012, and their son, Prince Oscar,…

  • Daniel, Samuel (British author)

    Samuel Daniel, English contemplative poet, marked in both verse and prose by his philosophic sense of history. Daniel entered Oxford in 1581. After publishing a translation in 1585 for his first patron, Sir Edward Dymoke, he secured a post with the English ambassador at Paris; later he travelled in

  • Daniel, The Book of (Old Testament)

    The Book of Daniel, a book of the Old Testament found in the Ketuvim (Writings), the third section of the Jewish canon, but placed among the Prophets in the Christian canon. The first half of the book (chapters 1–6) contains stories in the third person about the experiences of Daniel and his

  • Daniel, Yuly Markovich (Russian writer)

    Yuly Markovich Daniel, Soviet poet and short-story writer who was convicted with fellow writer Andrey D. Sinyavsky of anti-Soviet slander in a sensational 1966 trial that marked the beginning of literary repression under Leonid I. Brezhnev, general secretary of the Communist Party. After being

  • Daniele da Volterra (Italian artist)

    Daniele da Volterra, Italian Mannerist painter and sculptor, noted for his finely drawn, highly idealized figures done in the style of Michelangelo. It is believed that Daniele first studied in Siena under the painter Il Sodoma. His fresco Justice, completed for the Palazzo dei Priori after 1530,

  • Danieli, Cecilia (Italian industrialist)

    Cecilia Danieli, Italian industrialist who, as managing director of the Danieli Group, a company founded by her grandfather, revolutionized steelmaking throughout the world when she developed small, flexible steel mills, or minimills, that could produce high-quality steel more cheaply and

  • Danielian, Leon (American dancer)

    Leon Danielian, American ballet dancer who had an inimitable stage presence and masterful technique and achieved his greatest fame with the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo during the 1940s and ’50s; in the ’60s he became a highly respected teacher (b. Oct. 31, 1920--d. March 8,

  • Daniell cell (electronics)

    John Frederic Daniell: …and meteorologist who invented the Daniell cell, which was a great improvement over the voltaic cell used in the early days of battery development.

  • Daniell, John Frederic (British chemist)

    John Frederic Daniell, British chemist and meteorologist who invented the Daniell cell, which was a great improvement over the voltaic cell used in the early days of battery development. In 1820 Daniell invented a dew-point hygrometer (a device that indicates atmospheric humidity), which came into

  • Daniélou, Jean (French theologian)

    biblical literature: The modern period: …have been vigorously promoted by Jean Daniélou (with his researches into early Jewish Christianity), the Dominicans of the école Biblique et Archéologique (The School of the Bible and Archeology) in Jerusalem (to whom one must credit the Jerusalem Bible), and the Jesuits of the Pontifical Biblical Institute and others.

  • Danielovitch, Issur (American actor and producer)

    Kirk Douglas, American film actor and producer best known for his portrayals of resolute, emotionally charged heroes and antiheroes. The son of Russian Jewish immigrants, he was born Issur Danielovitch and later became known as Izzy Demsky before taking the stage name Kirk Douglas. He worked as an

  • Daniels, Charles (American swimmer)

    Charles Daniels, American swimmer who won seven Olympic medals and was the originator of the “American crawl,” which became the predominant freestyle form. At the 1904 Olympic Games in St. Louis, Missouri, Daniels was America’s star swimmer, winning gold medals in the 220-yard and 440-yard

  • Daniels, Charles Meldrum (American swimmer)

    Charles Daniels, American swimmer who won seven Olympic medals and was the originator of the “American crawl,” which became the predominant freestyle form. At the 1904 Olympic Games in St. Louis, Missouri, Daniels was America’s star swimmer, winning gold medals in the 220-yard and 440-yard

  • Daniels, David (American singer)

    David Daniels, American opera singer who, as the preeminent countertenor of his generation, was best known for his lead roles in George Frideric Handel’s operas, including Giulio Cesare, Rinaldo, and Radamisto. Singing was Daniels’s passion from an early age. The son of two voice teachers, he

  • Daniels, Josephus (United States diplomat)

    Josephus Daniels, U.S. editor, secretary of the U.S. Navy during World War I, and diplomat. Daniels was a newspaper publisher in Raleigh, N.C., and became influential in the Democratic Party. He worked for the nomination of Woodrow Wilson for the presidency in 1912 and, upon Wilson’s election, was

  • Daniels, Mel (American basketball player)

    Mel Daniels, (Melvin Joe Daniels), American basketball player (born July 20, 1944, Lincolnton, N.C.—died Oct. 30, 2015, Sheridan, Ind.), was a dominant centre in the American Basketball Association (ABA) and a seven-time All-Star (1968–74) who helped the Indiana Pacers win three ABA championships

  • Daniels, Melvin Joe (American basketball player)

    Mel Daniels, (Melvin Joe Daniels), American basketball player (born July 20, 1944, Lincolnton, N.C.—died Oct. 30, 2015, Sheridan, Ind.), was a dominant centre in the American Basketball Association (ABA) and a seven-time All-Star (1968–74) who helped the Indiana Pacers win three ABA championships

  • Daniels, Patricia Carroll (American writer)

    Patricia Cornwell, American crime writer best known for her best-selling series featuring the medical examiner Dr. Kay Scarpetta. Daniels’s father deserted the family when she was five years old. Several years later her depressed mother attempted to give the girl away to neighbours, the Baptist

  • Daniels, William (American actor)

    The Graduate: Cast:

  • Daniels, William (American cinematographer)
  • Danielsen, Karen (German psychoanalyst)

    Karen Horney, German-born American psychoanalyst who, departing from some of the basic principles of Sigmund Freud, suggested an environmental and social basis for the personality and its disorders. Karen Danielsen studied medicine at the universities of Freiburg, G?ttingen, and Berlin, taking her

  • Danielsson, Anders (Swedish politician)

    Anders Danielsson, the foremost peasant leader in early 19th-century Sweden. Danielsson was elected to the peasant chamber of the Riksdag (Parliament) in 1809. At the height of his career he came to represent 27 districts in that body, a unique achievement in Swedish parliamentary history. The

  • Daniil Romanovich (ruler of Galicia and Volhynia)

    Daniel Romanovich, ruler of the principalities of Galicia and Volhynia (now in Poland and Ukraine, respectively), who became one of the most powerful princes in east-central Europe. Son of Prince Roman Mstislavich, Daniel was only four years old when his father, who had united Galicia and Volhynia,

  • Danilevsky, Nikolay Yakovlevich (Russian philosopher)

    Nikolay Yakovlevich Danilevsky, Russian naturalist and historical philosopher, author of Rossiya i Evropa (1869; “Russia and Europe”), who was the first to propound the philosophy of history as a series of distinct civilizations. According to him, Russia and the Slavs should remain indifferent to

  • Danilo I (ruler of Montenegro)

    Danilo I, the first ruler of Montenegro of the Petrovi?-Njego? dynasty, which lasted from 1697 to 1918, when Montenegro was absorbed into the new Yugoslav state. In 1696 Danilo was nominated vladika, or prince-bishop, with power to select his successor from among his relatives—thus confirming the

  • Danilo II (prince of Montenegro)

    Danilo II, prince-bishop (1851–52) and then prince (1852–60) of Montenegro, who elevated Montenegro to a hereditary principality. He became ruler of Montenegro upon the death of his uncle, Peter II Petrovi? Njego?, the elective prince-bishop, and assumed the title of prince the following year

  • Danilo Romanovich (ruler of Galicia and Volhynia)

    Daniel Romanovich, ruler of the principalities of Galicia and Volhynia (now in Poland and Ukraine, respectively), who became one of the most powerful princes in east-central Europe. Son of Prince Roman Mstislavich, Daniel was only four years old when his father, who had united Galicia and Volhynia,

  • Danilova, Aleksandra Dionisyevna (Russian ballerina)

    Alexandra Danilova, prima ballerina who brought to American ballet the training and traditions of both the classical Russian and the modern Diaghilev repertoires. Danilova attended the Russian Imperial and Soviet State Ballet schools in Leningrad, where she studied under Agrippina Vaganova and

  • Danilova, Alexandra (Russian ballerina)

    Alexandra Danilova, prima ballerina who brought to American ballet the training and traditions of both the classical Russian and the modern Diaghilev repertoires. Danilova attended the Russian Imperial and Soviet State Ballet schools in Leningrad, where she studied under Agrippina Vaganova and

  • danio (fish)

    Danio, any of several slender tropical fishes of the genera Danio and Brachydanio in the carp family, Cyprinidae. Danios are hardy and swim actively about in schools. They are generally some 4–5 cm (1.5–2 inches) long. Several are often kept in home aquariums. Among these are the zebra danio, or

  • Danio malabaricus (fish)

    danio: …and yellow stripes, and the giant danio (D. malabaricus), a striped blue and yellow fish about 11 cm (4 inches) long.

  • Danio rerio (fish)

    danio: Among these are the zebra danio, or zebra fish (B. rerio), a popular species with lengthwise blue and yellow stripes, and the giant danio (D. malabaricus), a striped blue and yellow fish about 11 cm (4 inches) long.

  • Danish (people)

    Denmark: Ethnic groups: …almost entirely inhabited by ethnic Danes. Few Faroese or Greenlanders have settled in continental Denmark, despite their status as Danish citizens. A small minority of Germans, on the other hand, has been long established and is substantially assimilated. In the early 21st century, important ethnic minorities in the country included…

  • Danish East India Company (Danish trading company)

    India: The French: …in India included a Danish East India Company, which operated intermittently from 1616 from Tranquebar in southern India, acquiring Serampore (now Shrirampur) in Bengal in 1755, and the Ostend Company of Austrian Netherlands merchants from 1723, a serious rival until eliminated by diplomatic means in 1731. Efforts by Swedes and…

  • Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church of America (Protestant organization)

    American Evangelical Lutheran Church, church established by Danish immigrants who in 1874 took the name Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and formally organized as a synod in Neenah, Wis., in 1878. A constitution was accepted in 1879, and the present name was adopted in 1954. In 1962

  • Danish Freedom Council (Danish history)

    Denmark: Parliamentary democracy and war, c. 1900–45: In September 1943 the Danish Freedom Council was formed; under its leadership the activities of the various resistance groups could be coordinated, and cooperation between the resistance and leading politicians could be maintained. The major activities of the resistance groups included producing illegal newspapers, running a comprehensive intelligence service,…

  • Danish Girl, The (film by Hooper [2015])

    Eddie Redmayne: …to undergo gender-reassignment surgery, in The Danish Girl (2015). His performance earned Redmayne an Oscar nomination. He next starred as an expert on magical creatures in Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (2016), a Harry Potter prequel featuring a screenplay by J.K. Rowling. He reprised the role in Fantastic…

  • Danish Landrace (breed of hog)

    origins of agriculture: Hogs: …outstanding new breed was the Danish Landrace, which in the 1930s was crossed with several older American breeds, eventually giving rise to several new, mildly inbred lines. These lines produced more lean meat and less fat, as well as larger litters and bigger pigs.

  • Danish language

    Danish language, the official language of Denmark, spoken there by more than five million people. It is also spoken in a few communities south of the German border; it is taught in the schools of the Faroe Islands, of Iceland, and of Greenland. Danish belongs to the East Scandinavian branch of

  • Danish Law (legal history)

    Scandinavian law: Historical development of Scandinavian law: …was replaced by Christian V’s Danish Law (1683) and Norwegian Law (1687). The new codes were mainly based on the existing national laws of the two countries, and the influences of German, Roman, and canon laws were comparatively slight. Like the early codes, the newer codes consisted of public as…

  • Danish literature

    Danish literature, the body of writings produced in the Danish and Latin languages. During Denmark’s long union with Norway (1380–1814), the Danish language became the official language and the most widely used literary medium in the combined kingdoms. This article discusses literature created in

  • Danish Modern (furniture design)

    Denmark: The arts and sciences: …countries had their own characteristics), Danish Modern became extremely popular internationally in the 1950s and ’60s. Some of those designers and architects who are most associated with the style are Arne Jacobsen, Hans Wegner (creator of the Round Chair, with its distinctive curved seat back and semicircular armrest), and Kaare…

  • Danish pastry (food)

    baking: Danish dough: Although various portion-size sweet goods are often called “Danish pastry,” the name originally referred only to products made by a special roll-in procedure, in which yeast-leavened dough sheets are interleaved with layers of butter and the layers are reduced in thickness, then folded…

  • Danish People’s Party (political party, Denmark)

    Denmark: Denmark since the 1990s: …the ascendancy of the far-right Danish People’s Party (Dansk Folkeparti), a nationalist organization focused on immigration control. The new government immediately instituted policies further restricting immigration, including rules preventing would-be immigrants younger than age 24 from being naturalized as a result of marriage to, or sponsorship by, a Danish citizen.…

  • Danish River Formation (geological formation, Europe)

    Silurian Period: Clastic wedges: …Silurian (Llandovery) unit called the Danish River Formation is composed of interstratified conglomerates, sandstones, and shales 1 km (about 0.6 mile) thick. The Caledonian highlands dominated depositional patterns on the paleocontinent of Baltica. Much of the highland front followed approximately the present spine of Norway and affected a broader area…

  • Danish War (European history)

    German-Danish War, (1864), the second of two conflicts over the settlement of the Schleswig-Holstein question, a complex of problems arising from the relationship of the duchies of Schleswig and Holstein to Denmark, to each other, and to the German Confederation. Involved in it were a disputed

  • Danish-Swedish War (Scandinavian history)

    Sweden: Political conflict: In 1506 a new war with Denmark began, in which Lübeck supported the Swedes. Svante died in 1512, and the council now attempted a reconciliation with Denmark under the regency of Erik Trolle, whose family supported the union. Svante’s son, Sten Sture the Younger, led a coup, however, and…

  • Dānishkadeh (Iranian literary group)

    Mu?ammad Taqī Bahār: …of a literary group called Dānishkadeh (“The Place of Knowledge”). The group published a journal by the same name in which Bahār expressed his conservative literary tastes, upholding the classical style against that of the avant-garde poets. He remained engaged with politics throughout his life, including a brief period as…

  • Dānishmend (Turkmen ruler)

    Islamic arts: Popular literature: …Turkish tales of the knight Dānishmend. Other epics, such as the traditional Turkish tale of Dede Korkut, were preserved by storytellers who improvised certain parts of their tales (which were written down only afterward). Also, the role of the Sufi orders and of the artisans’ lodges in preserving and transmitting…

  • Dānishmend dynasty (Turkmen dynasty)

    Dānishmend dynasty, Turkmen dynasty that ruled in the Sivas-Kayseri-Malatya-Kastamonu region of central and northeastern Anatolia from about 1071 to 1178. Dānishmend (Dani?mend), founder of the dynasty, first appeared in Anatolia as a gazi (warrior for the faith of Islām) during a period of

  • Dānishmendid dynasty (Turkmen dynasty)

    Dānishmend dynasty, Turkmen dynasty that ruled in the Sivas-Kayseri-Malatya-Kastamonu region of central and northeastern Anatolia from about 1071 to 1178. Dānishmend (Dani?mend), founder of the dynasty, first appeared in Anatolia as a gazi (warrior for the faith of Islām) during a period of

  • Dani?mend (Turkmen ruler)

    Islamic arts: Popular literature: …Turkish tales of the knight Dānishmend. Other epics, such as the traditional Turkish tale of Dede Korkut, were preserved by storytellers who improvised certain parts of their tales (which were written down only afterward). Also, the role of the Sufi orders and of the artisans’ lodges in preserving and transmitting…

  • Dani?mend dynasty (Turkmen dynasty)

    Dānishmend dynasty, Turkmen dynasty that ruled in the Sivas-Kayseri-Malatya-Kastamonu region of central and northeastern Anatolia from about 1071 to 1178. Dānishmend (Dani?mend), founder of the dynasty, first appeared in Anatolia as a gazi (warrior for the faith of Islām) during a period of

  • Danjia (people)

    Fujian: Population composition: The “boat people” (Tanka or Danjia), who live on boats in the streams and estuaries, are not recognized as a separate group.

  • Danjon astrolabe (astronomy)

    André-Louis Danjon: …astrolabe, now known as the Danjon astrolabe. Within four years of its introduction (1956), the Danjon astrolabe was being used in more than 30 major observatories.

  • Danjon, André-Louis (French astronomer)

    André-Louis Danjon, French astronomer noted for his important developments in astronomical instruments and for his studies of the Earth’s rotation. Danjon served in the French army (1914–19) and then became an astronomer at the University Observatory at Strasbourg. In 1930 he became its director,

  • Danjou, Jean (French military officer)

    Battle of Camarón: Captain Jean Danjou, who led the legionnaires, enjoys the strange distinction of having his wooden hand revered as a relic of war.

  • Danjūrō I (Japanese Kabuki actor)

    Ichikawa Family: Among the best-known Ichikawas was Danjūrō I (1660–1704), the most famous actor of the Genroku period (1688–1703). He was also a playwright who originated the aragoto (“rough business”) style of heroic drama, the specialty of the Ichikawa family. The heroic dramas feature bold, handsome, idealized warriors with exaggerated and magical…

  • Danjūrō IX (Japanese Kabuki actor)

    Ichikawa Family: Danjūrō IX (1838–1903), of the Meiji period (1868–1912), revitalized the theatre and participated in the first kabuki performance in the presence of the emperor.

  • Danjūrō VII (Japanese Kabuki actor)

    Ichikawa Family: Danjūrō VII (1791–1859), the greatest actor of the late Tokugawa period (1603–1867), established the Kabuki jūhachiban (“18 Grand Plays of Kabuki”), the special repertoire of the Ichikawa family. Danjūrō IX (1838–1903), of the Meiji period (1868–1912), revitalized the theatre and participated in the first kabuki…

  • Dankali Plain (region, Ethiopia-Eritrea)

    Denakil Plain, arid lowland of northern Ethiopia and southeastern Eritrea, bordering Djibouti. It lies at the northern extreme of the Great Rift Valley and the Awash River. Live volcanoes (often called the Denakil Alps) separate it from the Red Sea. Any water that comes into the plain evaporates

  • Danko, Rick (Canadian musician)

    Rick Danko, Canadian-born musician (born Dec. 29, 1942, Simcoe, Ont.—died Dec. 10, 1999, Marbletown, N.Y.), played bass and other instruments and was a lead vocalist in the seminal rock group the Band, whose music drew on the American past and presaged the roots-based music genre called Americana.

  • Dankova Peak (mountain, Asia)

    Tien Shan: Physiography: …Kakshaal (Kokshaal-Tau) Range, in which Dankova Peak reaches a height of 19,626 feet (5,982 metres).

  • Dankworth, Johnny (British musician and composer)

    Sir John Philip William Dankworth, British jazz musician and composer (born Sept. 20, 1927, Woodford, Essex, Eng.—died Feb. 6, 2010, London, Eng.), helped popularize modern and bebop jazz in Britain; he was also a notable composer of film music and a champion of music education. Dankworth began his

  • Dankworth, Sir John Philip William (British musician and composer)

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