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  • Damrei Mountains (mountains, Cambodia)

    Damrei Mountains, north-south-trending range of high hills, an offshoot of the Kravanh Mountains, southwestern Cambodia. Extending 70 miles (110 km) north from the Gulf of Thailand, they reach a high point in the Bok Ko? ridge at Mount Bokor (3,547 feet [1,081 m]). The densely wooded hills receive

  • Damrong Rajanubhab (Thai prince)

    Damrong Rajanubhab, Thai prince, son of King Mongkut and brother of King Chulalongkorn. He was the founder of modern education and provincial administration and was Thailand’s leading intellectual of his generation. Damrong himself had only four years of formal education in short-lived palace Thai

  • Damrosch, Leopold (German violinist and conductor)

    Metropolitan Opera: …management passed to the conductor Leopold Damrosch and later to his son, conductor and composer Walter Damrosch. In 1892, under Abbey, Walter Schoeffel, and Maurice Grau, the programming was a balance of German, French, and Italian. Grau, as manager during the Met’s “Golden Age” (1898–1903), drew many excellent artists from…

  • Damrosch, Walter (American musician)

    Walter Damrosch, Prussian-born American orchestral conductor and composer whose activities spanned more than half a century of American musical life. Damrosch studied with his father, Leopold Damrosch (1832–85), German violinist and conductor, who settled in New York City in 1871. Upon his father’s

  • damsel bug (insect)

    Damsel bug, (family Nabidae), any predacious insect in the true bug order, Heteroptera, that feeds on insect eggs, aphids, and small caterpillars. Damsel bugs are generally divided into two types. One is about 8 mm (0.3 inch) long and yellow-brown in colour with well-developed wings, and the

  • Damsel in Distress, A (film by Stevens [1937])

    George Stevens: Swing Time, Gunga Din, and Woman of the Year: Moviegoers also largely avoided A Damsel in Distress (1937), a musical that featured Astaire but not Rogers, who was replaced by Joan Fontaine. The film, however, was praised for the “Fun House” number, which earned Hermes Pan an Oscar for best dance direction, and for the comedy of George…

  • damselfish (fish)

    Damselfish, any of about 250 species of small, primarily tropical marine fishes of the family Pomacentridae (order Perciformes) found in the Atlantic and Indo-Pacific oceans. Damselfishes are deep-bodied and usually have forked tails. They resemble the related cichlids and, like them, have a single

  • damselfly (insect)

    Damselfly, (suborder Zygoptera), any of a group of predatory, aerial insects that are in the order Odonata. Damselflies are found mainly near shallow, freshwater habitats and are graceful fliers with slender bodies and long, filmy, net-veined wings. Damselflies are generally smaller, more delicate,

  • Damson plum (plant)

    plum: …or Asiatic origin, is the Damson plum (P. insititia); ancient writings connect early cultivation of those plums with the region around Damascus. The Japanese plum was first domesticated in China thousands of years ago but was extensively developed in Japan; from there it was introduced to the rest of the…

  • Damu (ancient god)

    Damu, in Mesopotamian religion, Sumerian deity, city god of Girsu, east of Ur in the southern orchards region. Damu, son of Enki, was a vegetation god, especially of the vernal flowing of the sap of trees and plants. His name means “The Child,” and his cult—apparently celebrated primarily by

  • Damu (ancient goddess)

    Damu: A different deity called Damu was a goddess of healing and the daughter of Nininsina of Isin.

  • damyan (musical instrument)

    Central Asian arts: The music of Nepal, Bhutan, and Sikkim: …lute, such as the long-necked damyan of Nepal and its Sikkimese relative, may be linked to a similar instrument of the Pamir Mountains, whereas a Sikkimese flute having an outside air duct (in contrast to the inside duct of a Western recorder) seems to be a unique instrument. The Sherpas…

  • dan (unit of weight)

    Shi, the basic unit of weight in ancient China. The shi was created by Shi Huang Di, who became the first emperor of China in 221 bc and who is celebrated for his unification of regulations fixing the basic units. He fixed the shi at about 60 kg (132 pounds). The modern shi is equivalent to 71.68

  • Dan (African people)

    Dan, an ethnolinguistic grouping of people inhabiting the mountainous west-central C?te d’Ivoire and adjacent areas of Liberia. The Dan belong to the Southern branch of the Mande linguistic subgroup of the Niger-Congo language family. They originated somewhere to the west or northwest of their

  • Dan (Hebrew tribe)

    Dan, one of the 12 tribes of Israel that in biblical times comprised the people of Israel who later became the Jewish people. The tribe was named after the first of two sons born to Jacob (also called Israel) and Bilhah, the maidservant of Jacob’s second wife, Rachel. Nine of the other 11 tribes

  • Dan (people)

    Fujian: Population composition: The “boat people” (Tanka or Danjia), who live on boats in the streams and estuaries, are not recognized as a separate group.

  • Dan Dare (comic strip)

    comic strip: Europe: …was The Eagle (1950–69), with Dan Dare (begun 1950; strip killed and relaunched a number of times, last in 2007) by Frank Hampson and the Rev. Marcus Morris, based on “healthy” Christian principles and directed against the American horror comic. At its peak Dan Dare reached a circulation of about…

  • Dan Flavin Art Institute (building, Bridgehampton, New York, United States)

    Dia Art Foundation: …in 1983 Dia established the Dan Flavin Art Institute in Bridgehampton, New York, which serves as a permanent installation of the light-based works created by Flavin between 1963 and 1981.

  • Dan Patch (racehorse)

    Dan Patch, (foaled 1896), American harness racehorse (Standardbred), a nearly legendary horse in his time, who established in 1905 a world pacing record of 1:55 14 that endured for 33 years. (In 1906 he paced a mile in 1:55 flat—Billy Direct’s record-breaking time in 1938—but this feat was not

  • Dan River (river, Israel)

    Dan River, river rising in Israel. It is the largest of the three principal tributaries of the Jordan River. The Dan River issues from Tel Dan (Tell al-Qā?ī), the site of the biblical city of Dan (Laish). The river is fed by the rains and snowmelt that pass through the rock of Mount Hermon and

  • Dan Takuma (Japanese industrialist)

    Dan Takuma, manager of the giant Mitsui zaibatsu, the greatest of the family-owned combines in pre-World War II Japan. A graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an important member of Japan’s business elite, Dan was assassinated by right-wing nationalists who regarded him as a

  • Dan, Ikuma (Japanese composer)

    Japanese music: Composers in Western styles: …Yuzuru (1952; Twilight Crane) by Ikuma Dan. The plot is a Japanese folktale, and, although the musical style is a mixture of the music of Maurice Ravel and the late works of Giacomo Puccini, one finds as well deliberate uses of folk songs and idioms. Shimizu Osamu is perhaps more…

  • Dana (Celtic war goddess)

    Macha, in Celtic religion, one of three war goddesses; it is also a collective name for the three, who were also referred to as the three Morrígan. As an individual, Macha was known by a great variety of names, including Dana and Badb (“Crow,” or “Raven”). She was the great earth mother, or female

  • Dana (Celtic goddess)

    Danu, in Celtic religion, the earth-mother goddess or female principle, who was honoured under various names from eastern Europe to Ireland. The mythology that surrounded her was contradictory and confused; mother goddesses of earlier peoples were ultimately identified with her, as were many

  • dāna (Buddhism)

    Buddhism: Popular religious practices: Moreover, the dana (Pali: “gift-giving”) ritual of the Theravada tradition and similar exchanges between monks and laypersons are performed independently of other rituals. Both of these practices, however, are embedded in one way or another in virtually all other Buddhist rituals, including calendric rituals, pilgrimage rituals, rites…

  • Dana, Charles A. (American journalist)

    Charles A. Dana, American journalist who became a national figure as editor of the New York Sun. In 1839 Dana entered Harvard College (now Harvard University), but poor health and lack of money forced him to leave in 1841. From 1841 to 1846 he lived at the utopian Brook Farm community, where he was

  • Dana, Charles Anderson (American journalist)

    Charles A. Dana, American journalist who became a national figure as editor of the New York Sun. In 1839 Dana entered Harvard College (now Harvard University), but poor health and lack of money forced him to leave in 1841. From 1841 to 1846 he lived at the utopian Brook Farm community, where he was

  • Dana, Francis (American diplomat)

    John Quincy Adams: Early life and career: …at age 14, Adams accompanied Francis Dana, United States envoy to Russia, as his private secretary and interpreter of French. Dana, after lingering for more than a year in St. Petersburg, was not received by the Russian government, so in 1782 Adams, returning by way of Scandinavia, Hanover, and the…

  • Dana, James D. (American geologist and mineralogist)

    James D. Dana, American geologist, mineralogist, and naturalist who, in explorations of the South Pacific, the U.S. Northwest, Europe, and elsewhere, made important studies of mountain building, volcanic activity, sea life, and the origin and structure of continents and ocean basins. Dana attended

  • Dana, James Dwight (American geologist and mineralogist)

    James D. Dana, American geologist, mineralogist, and naturalist who, in explorations of the South Pacific, the U.S. Northwest, Europe, and elsewhere, made important studies of mountain building, volcanic activity, sea life, and the origin and structure of continents and ocean basins. Dana attended

  • Dana, Richard Henry (American author)

    Richard Henry Dana, American lawyer and author of the popular autobiographical narrative Two Years Before the Mast. Dana withdrew from Harvard College when measles weakened his eyesight, and he shipped to California as a sailor in August 1834 to regain his health. After voyaging among California’s

  • Dana? (painting by Rembrandt)

    Rembrandt van Rijn: Rembrandt and Rubens: …Blinding of Samson or the Dana? (both from 1636) in its original form. It seems that Huygens did not accept the gift.

  • Danae (work by Gossart)

    Jan Gossart: In his Danae, Gossart employs an elaborate architectural setting as a foil for the seminude figure, a device he frequently used. Throughout his life, he retained the lapidary technique and careful observation that were traditional in Netherlandish art.

  • Dana? (Greek mythology)

    Perseus: …the son of Zeus and Dana?, the daughter of Acrisius of Argos. As an infant he was cast into the sea in a chest with his mother by Acrisius, to whom it had been prophesied that he would be killed by his grandson. After Perseus had grown up on the…

  • Danae with Nursemaid (painting by Titian)

    Titian: Mythological paintings: …first pair consists of the Danae with Nursemaid and the Venus and Adonis. The magnificent nude Danae lies upon her couch, knees raised, as Jupiter descends to her in the form of golden rain, and her nursemaid rather amusingly attempts to catch the coins in her apron. This work (of…

  • Danaea (plant genus)

    fern: Annotated classification: Christensenia, Marattia, and Danaea) with about 150 species, widely distributed in tropical regions. Class Polypodiopsida (also known as Filicopsida) Order Osmundales Family Osmundaceae (royal ferns) Plants in soil, often in

  • Danaher, Kevin (activist)

    Global Exchange: …in 1988 by political activists Kevin Danaher and Medea Benjamin to promote social, economic, and environmental justice. The membership-based organization, headquartered in San Francisco, criticized the model of globalization that empowered multinational corporations and sometimes required the support of military authority. Instead, the organization championed fair trade, promoted

  • Dana?d (Greek mythology)

    Danaus: …with his 50 daughters (the Dana?ds) to Argos, where he became king. Soon thereafter the 50 sons of Aegyptus arrived in Argos, and Danaus was forced to consent to their marriage with his daughters. Danaus, however, commanded each daughter to slay her husband on the marriage night. They all obeyed…

  • Danaidae (insect)

    Milkweed butterfly, (subfamily Danainae), any of a group of butterflies in the brush-footed butterfly (q.v.) family, Nymphalidae (order Lepidoptera). Some authorities consider this group to be at the family level (Danaidae). The majority of species are found in both Old and New World tropics.

  • Danainae (insect)

    Milkweed butterfly, (subfamily Danainae), any of a group of butterflies in the brush-footed butterfly (q.v.) family, Nymphalidae (order Lepidoptera). Some authorities consider this group to be at the family level (Danaidae). The majority of species are found in both Old and New World tropics.

  • Danakil (people)

    Afar, a people of the Horn of Africa who speak Afar (also known as ’Afar Af), a language of the Eastern Cushitic branch of the Afro-Asiatic language family. They live in northeastern Ethiopia, southeastern Eritrea, and Djibouti, where, with the Issas, they are the dominant people. It is thought

  • Danakil Plain (region, Ethiopia-Eritrea)

    Denakil Plain, arid lowland of northern Ethiopia and southeastern Eritrea, bordering Djibouti. It lies at the northern extreme of the Great Rift Valley and the Awash River. Live volcanoes (often called the Denakil Alps) separate it from the Red Sea. Any water that comes into the plain evaporates

  • Danao (Philippines)

    Danao, city, eastern Cebu island, Philippines, about 17 miles (27 km) northeast of Cebu City. It was founded in 1844 and is a port on the Camotes Sea for nearby coalfields. It is also a service centre for the coastal agricultural area that produces rice and corn (maize). Its name is derived from

  • Danapur (India)

    Dinapur Nizamat, city, northern Bihar state, northeastern India. It is situated on the Ganges (Ganga) River, about 15 miles (25 km) west of Patna. The city is a major road and rail junction and an agricultural trade centre. Industries include printing, oilseed milling, and metalworks. There is a

  • Danau-Danau Wissel (lakes, Indonesia)

    Wissel Lakes, chain of three highland lakes located in the Sudirman Range of the Indonesian province of Papua (in western New Guinea). They comprise Paniai, the largest and northernmost; Tage, to its south; and Tigi, the southernmost. Situated at an elevation of about 5,750 feet (1,750 metres),

  • Danaus (Greek mythology)

    Danaus, in Greek legend, son of Belus, king of Egypt, and twin brother of Aegyptus. Driven out of Egypt by his brother, he fled with his 50 daughters (the Dana?ds) to Argos, where he became king. Soon thereafter the 50 sons of Aegyptus arrived in Argos, and Danaus was forced to consent to their

  • Danaus gilippus (insect)

    reproductive behaviour: Insects: …of butterflies, such as the queen butterfly (Danaus gilippus), the males possess “hair pencils” that project from the end of the abdomen and emit a scent when swept over the female’s antennae during courtship behaviour. Copulation does not occur in the absence of this chemical display.

  • Danaus plexippus (insect)

    Monarch butterfly, (Danaus plexippus), familiar member of the milkweed butterfly group (subfamily Danainae, order Lepidoptera) known for its large size, its orange and black wings, and its long annual migrations. Monarchs are concentrated in North, Central, and South America but can also be found

  • danbi gu (Chinese musical instrument)

    Bangu, Chinese frame drum that, when struck by one or two small bamboo sticks, creates a sharp dry sound essential to the aesthetics of Chinese opera. It is also used in many Chinese chamber music ensembles. The drum, which is about 25 cm (10 inches) in diameter and 10 cm (4 inches) deep, consists

  • Danbury (Connecticut, United States)

    Danbury, city, coextensive with the town (township) of Danbury, Fairfield county, southwestern Connecticut, U.S. It lies along the Still River in the foothills of the Berkshire Hills. Settled in 1685, it was named in 1687 for Danbury, England, and was incorporated as a town in 1702. The

  • Danbury Hatters’ Case (law case)

    Danbury Hatters’ Case, U.S. Supreme Court case in which unions were held to be subject to the antitrust laws. In 1902 the United Hatters of North America, having failed to organize the firm of D.E. Loewe in Danbury, Conn., called for a nationwide boycott of the firm’s products. The firm brought

  • Danby (Illinois, United States)

    Glen Ellyn, village, DuPage county, northeastern Illinois, U.S. It is a suburb of Chicago, lying 23 miles (37 km) west of downtown. Glen Ellyn’s phases of development were marked by seven name changes: Babcock’s Grove (1833), for the first settlers, Ralph and Morgan Babcock; DuPage Center (1834);

  • Danby, Ken (Canadian painter)

    Ken Danby, (Kenneth Edison Danby), Canadian painter (born March 6, 1940, Sault Sainte Marie, Ont.—died Sept. 23, 2007, Algonquin Provincial Park, Ont.), was best known for paintings that featured brilliant colours and were emblematic of Canada, notably At the Crease (1972), which depicted a masked

  • Danby, Kenneth Edison (Canadian painter)

    Ken Danby, (Kenneth Edison Danby), Canadian painter (born March 6, 1940, Sault Sainte Marie, Ont.—died Sept. 23, 2007, Algonquin Provincial Park, Ont.), was best known for paintings that featured brilliant colours and were emblematic of Canada, notably At the Crease (1972), which depicted a masked

  • Danby, Thomas Osborne, Earl of (English statesman)

    Thomas Osborne, 1st duke of Leeds, English statesman who, while chief minister to King Charles II, organized the Tories in Parliament. In addition he played a key role in bringing William and Mary to the English throne in 1689. The son of a Royalist Yorkshire landowner, Osborne did not become

  • dance (performing arts)

    Dance, the movement of the body in a rhythmic way, usually to music and within a given space, for the purpose of expressing an idea or emotion, releasing energy, or simply taking delight in the movement itself. Dance is a powerful impulse, but the art of dance is that impulse channeled by skillful

  • dance (religion)

    ecstasy: Other methods are: dancing (as used by the Mawlawiyyah, or whirling dervishes, a Muslim Sufi sect); the use of sedatives and stimulants (as utilized in some Hellenistic mystery religions); and the use of certain drugs, such as peyote, mescaline, hashish, LSD, and similar products (in certain Islamic sects…

  • dance (animal behaviour)

    honeybee: …honeybee is remarkable for the dancing movements it performs in the hive to communicate information to its fellow bees about the location, distance, size, and quality of a particular food source in the surrounding area.

  • Dance Class (painting by Degas)

    Edgar Degas: Realism and Impressionism: …performance scenes, such as his Dance Class of 1871, finding eager buyers for many of them and soon becoming identified with their theme. The dance allowed Degas to test his skills in a daring new context: the world of the Paris Opéra was surrounded by sexual intrigue as well as…

  • dance criticism

    Dance criticism, the descriptive analysis of a dance performance that is printed, broadcast, or transmitted electronically. Dance is among the most ephemeral of all forms of art, and until the use of photography and the development of useful dance notation in the late 19th century, most of the very

  • Dance Dance Dance (novel by Murakami Haruki)

    Haruki Murakami: …with Dansu Dansu Dansu (1988; Dance Dance Dance).

  • dance drama

    Indonesia: Theatre and dance: …they are typically termed “dance-dramas.” Of these traditions, the wayang wong and wayang topeng (masked theatre) of Java and Bali, as well as the Balinese plays recounting the tale of the witch Calonarang, are among the most widely known. Since independence, Indonesian choreographers trained at the country’s performing arts…

  • dance fly (insect)

    Dance fly, (family Empididae), any member of a family of insects in the fly order, Diptera, that are named for their erratic movements while in flight. Dance flies are small with a disproportionately large thorax and a long tapering abdomen. In males, the abdomen usually bears conspicuous genitalia

  • Dance Hall at Louse Point (album by Harvey and Parish)

    PJ Harvey: On Dance Hall at Louse Point (1996), a collaboration with John Parish, who had been her bandmate in Automatic Dlamini when they were teenagers, she gave up control of the music, which, far more than her lyrics, turned out to be her main strength.

  • Dance II, The (painting by Matisse)

    Henri Matisse: Riviera years: …version of his large mural The Dance II, which was commissioned by Albert C. Barnes for the Barnes Foundation.

  • Dance in the Sun, A (novel by Jacobson)

    Dan Jacobson: >A Dance in the Sun (1956), and The Price of Diamonds (1957)—form a complex mosaic that provides a peculiarly incisive view of racially divided South African society. Much of his best work was in his short stories, especially in the collections The Zulu and the…

  • Dance Index (magazine edited by Kirstein)

    Lincoln Kirstein: …1942 to 1948 he edited Dance Index, a magazine that published scholarly, illustrated, and annotated monographs on the entire spectrum of dance topics. In bound form (seven volumes), Dance Index became a major reference work for dance scholars. Kirstein also published poetry, plays, novels, memoirs, and critical studies on the…

  • Dance Makes Inroads in Museums

    The Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA) announced its 2016 interdisciplinary exhibition, “Dance! American Art 1830–1960,” as the first major show to explore the rich and varied relationship that American artists had had with movement, rhythm, and the body. Along with more than 90 works of art by such

  • Dance Naked (album by Mellencamp)

    John Mellencamp: …most notable of these included Dance Naked (1994), which went gold on the strength of its cover version of Van Morrison’s “Wild Night”; Mr. Happy Go Lucky (1996), featuring the hit single “Key West Intermezzo (I Saw You First)”; the self-titled John Mellencamp (1998); and Trouble No More (2003), an…

  • dance notation

    Dance notation, the recording of dance movement through the use of written symbols. Dance notation is to dance what musical notation is to music and what the written word is to drama. In dance, notation is the translation of four-dimensional movement (time being the fourth dimension) into signs

  • Dance of Death (series by Holbein the Younger)

    Hans Holbein the Younger: …allegorical concept of the “Dance of Death,” was designed by him and cut by another artist as early as about 1523 to 1526 but was not published until 1538. Its scenes display an immaculate sense of order, packing much information about the lifestyles and habits of Death’s victims into…

  • Dance of Death, The (play by Auden)

    W. H. Auden: Life: …in London, he wrote first The Dance of Death (a musical propaganda play) and then three plays in collaboration with Christopher Isherwood, Auden’s friend since preparatory school: The Dog Beneath the Skin (1935), The Ascent of F 6 (1936), and On the Frontier (1938). Auden also wrote commentaries for documentary…

  • Dance of Death, The (play by Strindberg)

    comedy: 20th-century tragicomedy: Strindberg’s Dance of Death (1901), with its cruelty and pain dispensed with robust pleasure by a fiercely battling husband and wife, is a significant model of the grotesque in the modern theatre; it is reflected in such mid-20th-century examples of what came to be called black…

  • Dance of the Chosen (dance by Humphrey)

    Doris Humphrey: Dance of the Chosen (1931; later and better known as The Shakers) added drums, accordions, and incoherent speech to portray the ecstatic nature of the Shakers’ religious fervour. Her trilogy known as New Dance, after the title of the third section, was completed in 1936…

  • Dance of the Forests, A (play by Soyinka)

    Wole Soyinka: …wrote his first important play, A Dance of the Forests (produced 1960; published 1963), for the Nigerian independence celebrations. The play satirizes the fledgling nation by stripping it of romantic legend and by showing that the present is no more a golden age than was the past.

  • Dance of the Happy Shades (short stories by Munro)

    Canadian literature: Fiction: …short stories—in collections ranging from Dance of the Happy Shades (1968) to The View from Castle Rock (2006)—depict the domestic lives and relationships of women in Toronto, small-town Ontario, and British Columbia in an increasingly enigmatic style. Leonard Cohen’s Beautiful Losers (1966) probes the relationship between sainthood, violence, eroticism, and…

  • Dance of the Hours (work by Ponchielli)

    Dance of the Hours, musical episode from Act III, scene 2, of Amilcare Ponchielli’s opera La gioconda that is often performed as a stand-alone orchestral work. In its original context—as a balletic interlude to entertain a party—it (and the entire opera) premiered in Milan on April 8, 1876. The

  • Dance of the Magdalene (engraving by Lucas van Leyden)

    Lucas van Leyden: …1519, when he engraved the Dance of the Magdalene. This work also has a large number of figures, but they are tranquil and are lucidly composed in small groupings.

  • Dance of the Red Tiger Devil (Tibetan play)

    mask: Theatrical uses: …for exorcising demons called the Dance of the Red Tiger Devil is performed at fixed seasons of the year exclusively by the priests or lamas wearing awe-inspiring masks of deities and demons. Masks employed in this mystery play are made of papier-maché, cloth, and occasionally gilt copper. In the Indian…

  • dance paddle

    Oceanic art and architecture: The Massim area: …stern of seagoing canoes; and dance paddles (two semicircular panels connected by a handhold bar). Dance paddles were sometimes painted, but, in general, painting of wooden objects was minimal. Painting was mainly used to decorate the gables of yam storehouses and on convex oval war shields.

  • Dance Repertory Theatre (American dance company)

    Helen Tamiris: She also organized the Dance Repertory Theatre (1930–32), which produced concerts jointly with such modern dance choreographers as Martha Graham, Doris Humphrey, and Charles Weidman. She encouraged the inclusion of dance in the WPA Federal Theatre Project and served as principal choreographer from 1937 to 1939.

  • dance suite (music)

    Suite, in music, a group of self-contained instrumental movements of varying character, usually in the same key. During the 17th and 18th centuries, the period of its greatest importance, the suite consisted principally of dance movements. In the 19th and 20th centuries the term also referred more

  • Dance Theatre of Harlem (American ballet company)

    Arthur Mitchell: …he and Karel Shook founded Dance Theatre of Harlem, an integrated school, whose associated company made its debut in 1971 in New York City. Mitchell choreographed a number of ballets for the company before it disbanded in 2004, heavily in debt; the troupe was revived in 2012. In 2009 Mitchell…

  • Dance to the Music of Time, A (work by Powell)

    A Dance to the Music of Time, series of 12 novels by Anthony Powell, published from 1951 to 1975. The series—which includes A Question of Upbringing (1951), A Buyer’s Market (1952), The Acceptance World (1955), At Lady Molly’s (1957), Casanova’s Chinese Restaurant (1960), The Kindly Ones (1962),

  • Dance with My Father (recording by Vandross)

    Luther Vandross: …be his last studio album, Dance with My Father, which earned four Grammy Awards, including best R&B album, while the title track took the award for song of the year.

  • dance, African

    African dance, performing art deeply woven into the social fabric of Africa and generally involving aspects of music and theatre as well as rhythmic bodily movement. See also African music and mask. In African societies, dance serves a complex diversity of social purposes. Within an indigenous

  • Dance, George, the Younger (British architect and artist)

    George Dance, the Younger, British architect who was responsible for extensive urban redevelopment in London. He was a founding member of Great Britain’s Royal Academy of Arts. The youngest son of George Dance the Elder, who was clerk of works to the City of London from 1735 to 1768, the younger

  • Dance, Girl, Dance (film by Arzner [1940])

    Dorothy Arzner: Films of the 1930s and ’40s: Dance, Girl, Dance (1940), which paired Lucille Ball (in perhaps her finest dramatic role) as a stripper with Maureen O’Hara as an aspiring ballerina, is an unapologetic look at the world of burlesque. Arzner’s last film, First Comes Courage (1943), starred Merle Oberon as a…

  • dance, Oceanic
  • Dance, The (work by Carpeaux)

    Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux: His most famous work, The Dance (completed 1869), a sculptural group for the facade of the Paris Opéra, created a sensation and was attacked as immoral. His works were the subject of some of the most significant debates about sculpture during the mid-19th century. In order to allay the…

  • dance, Western

    Western dance, history of Western dance from ancient times to the present and including the development of ballet, the waltz, and various types of modern dance. The peoples of the West—of Europe and of the countries founded through permanent European settlement elsewhere—have a history of dance

  • dancehall music (music)

    Dancehall music, style of Jamaican popular music that had its genesis in the political turbulence of the late 1970s and became Jamaica’s dominant music in the 1980s and ’90s. Central to dancehall is the deejay, who raps, or “toasts,” over a prerecorded rhythm track (bass guitar and drums), or

  • Dancer and Gazelles (sculpture by Manship)

    Paul Manship: …large decorative works—mostly in bronze—are Dancer and Gazelles (1916), of which there are versions in several museums, and Prometheus (1934), a fountain sculpture at Rockefeller Center in New York. He executed many portraits in marble; most striking are Pauline Frances—Three Weeks Old (1914) and John D. Rockefeller (1918). Manship’s depictions…

  • Dancer in the Dark (film by von Trier [2000])

    Bj?rk: …score for Lars von Trier’s Dancer in the Dark (2000), a tragic musical in which she also starred. The film won the Palme d’Or at the Cannes film festival, and Bj?rk was named best actress.

  • Dancer with a Bouquet Bowing (painting by Degas)

    Edgar Degas: A versatile technician: …pastel or gouache, as in Dancer with a Bouquet Bowing (1877). The results can be exhilarating, notably when the effects of light and texture are subtly expressive of the chosen subject, but he soon tired of the technique. The late 1870s marked the height of Degas’s graphic experimentation, after which…

  • Dancer, Stanley Franklin (American horseman)

    Stanley Franklin Dancer, American horseman (born July 25, 1927, West Windsor, N.J.—died Sept. 8, 2005, Pompano Beach, Fla.), captured 3,781 races during his career as one of harness racing’s most aggressive drivers. He began driving trotters in 1945 and soon after added trainer, owner, and b

  • Dancers at the Barre (painting by Degas)

    Edgar Degas: Final years: …oil painting of about 1900, Dancers at the Barre, for example, Degas created a vital equilibrium between the energy of the two women in a tense composition of verticals and diagonals and of green skirts and orange walls.

  • Dances of Universal Peace

    folk dance: Dancing for enlightenment: The Dances of Universal Peace were developed by Samuel Lewis from California, who was a Sufi and Zen master. He had been a student of modern dance pioneer Ruth St. Denis, who inspired him with her understanding of dance as a means to attain wisdom. In…

  • Dances With Wolves (film by Costner [1990])

    Dances With Wolves, American epic western film, released in 1990, that was directed by and starred Kevin Costner and won widespread admiration as well as seven Academy Awards, including that for best picture. It also received the Golden Globe Award for best drama. After an apparently heroic act

  • Dancing Chicken, The (novel by Musgrave)

    Susan Musgrave: Fiction and essays: …Charcoal Burners (1980); her second, The Dancing Chicken (1987), is a darkly satiric novel with highly eccentric characters. The Dancing Chicken was followed by Cargo of Orchids (2000) and Given (2012). She also wrote several children’s books: Gullband (1974), a series of poems; Hag’s Head (1980), a Halloween story; Kestrel…

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